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Old 08-27-2017, 05:56 PM
bu2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamerD View Post
Interesting...I didn't know that but then again, been in the metro area most of my life. I guess I am privileged not to have lived in a part of the state that sees a good deal of tornadic activity.
Camilla has been repeatedly hit over the last 15 years.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Camilla has been repeatedly hit over the last 15 years.
Okay let me look up where Camilla is.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:13 PM
 
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Well, either way, I definitely won't be living in South Georgia. I know the metro area gets some sometimes but knowing what you just told me...
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Frisco, TX
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Georgia is in "Dixie Alley". I feel like while there might be a lot of tornadoes, most of them aren't very strong and are short lived. I suppose an exception to this has been tornado outbreaks in Alabama in recent years. At least most of the houses in North Georgia have basements. Houses in Oklahoma and Texas don't, so you have to get a costly tornado shelter and most people fatefully forgo it. There was an F5 tornado that hit near OKC a few years ago. Whole houses were stripped right down to their foundations, and if you didn't have a shelter or a basement, I don't know how you'd be able to walk away from that.
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soccernerd View Post
Georgia is in "Dixie Alley". I feel like while there might be a lot of tornadoes, most of them aren't very strong and are short lived. I suppose an exception to this has been tornado outbreaks in Alabama in recent years. At least most of the houses in North Georgia have basements. Houses in Oklahoma and Texas don't, so you have to get a costly tornado shelter and most people fatefully forgo it. There was an F5 tornado that hit near OKC a few years ago. Whole houses were stripped right down to their foundations, and if you didn't have a shelter or a basement, I don't know how you'd be able to walk away from that.

If I lived in a state like Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas where I have heard stories of how many tornadoes they get per year plus how strong they are, I'd make certain that wherever I buy has a storm cellar. Ever since I was a child and Dorothy and Toto got taken up by that tornado...in the words of a wise person, "Ain't nobody got time for that."
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Jonesboro
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Default Coastal region disasters

Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Misleading article. As they note, the subsidence district was formed in 1975, yet they compare the subsidence to 1920. Numerous areas are under orders to eliminate use of groundwater over the next 10 or so years. Many of the unincorporated Municipal Utility Districts are teaming with the city of Houston which already relies on resevoirs, not wells. Pretty much all of Harris County will be off groundwater in the relatively near future.

Yes, the subsidence district was formed in the 1970's but the map shown in the Chronicle article is based on data gathered since the 1920's by the U.S. Geological Survey. That scientific entity has been a part of the U.S. government since 1879.
I don't see anything misleading about using prior existing data that predates the creation of the subsidence district. That's really a nonissue. It's not as if older data is invalid simply because of it's source and the fact that it predates the creation of the subsidence district by 50 years.
The U.S. Geological Survey wears many hats in it's mission but it has been charged with geological surveys for much of it's 139 year existence.
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Old 08-27-2017, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Macon, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Georgia is actually almost as bad as Oklahoma with tornados. Not so much the Atlanta area, but South Georgia.
Not saying you're wrong, but are there any stats that back this up? As a Maconite, it seems we're rarely hit with the worst of the storms when a system comes through but there are are a few places to the East, West, and North of us that always seem to get a raw deal like Taylor County, Baldwin County, Washington County, and Monroe County.

Occasionally I'll hear about places around Albany being hit hard, but it seems like I hear the same about places in Metro Atlanta at the same rate, usually in the Northern or Western part of the Metro.

I dont know, I just never get that feeling like it occurs any less up that way.
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Old 08-28-2017, 03:51 AM
 
Location: atlanta
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we usually get strong storm systems coming in from the west, but it seems like once they hit the appalachians, the storms weaken a lot.
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Old 08-28-2017, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soccernerd View Post
It really has seemed like the past few years there's a YEARLY hundred or five hundred year flood in Houston. The topography is so flat, and they're basicallly just pouring concrete on swamp. It's no wonder they've had problems with flooding. I looked at houses, albeit online, that were newer than our house, larger than our house, and were only 100,000 or 150,000. They weren't in Sugar Land or The Woodlands, and who knows maybe they had hidden problems, but that just tells you how much the land is valued there. I think we're going to have rethink development especially along the coast during this time of rising sea levels and more powerful storm systems.
This is the major problem and you've had environmentalists,urban planners, and all consistently write articles about this.

Houston wasn’t built to withstand a storm like Harvey.

Quote:
One underlying cause of Houston’s suffering is that developers and town officials in Harris County, which contains Houston, have for years advocated the development of the wetlands and prairies around the city—land that had long served to absorb the rainwater that now overwhelms the region’s sewers and streams every year.
Arrogance and lack of planning has led to this. We have "land o'plenty" as people have said and you see what is happening here. They should have never built homes close to these bayous like this and, as you can see, sprawl isn't nearly always good. Just because you can does not mean you should. This is what, the third flood event in as many years? Yes, it's becoming the new normal (though I think any city would have problems if they got that much rain dumped on them in a 24 hour period).
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Old 08-28-2017, 07:28 AM
bu2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Soul Bro View Post
Not saying you're wrong, but are there any stats that back this up? As a Maconite, it seems we're rarely hit with the worst of the storms when a system comes through but there are are a few places to the East, West, and North of us that always seem to get a raw deal like Taylor County, Baldwin County, Washington County, and Monroe County.

Occasionally I'll hear about places around Albany being hit hard, but it seems like I hear the same about places in Metro Atlanta at the same rate, usually in the Northern or Western part of the Metro.

I dont know, I just never get that feeling like it occurs any less up that way.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dixie_Alley

Someone above remembered the name-Dixie Alley. I've seen other maps that show a smaller area than this wiki article, concentrated just in central Alabama and southwest Georgia.
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