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Old 06-20-2018, 08:05 AM
 
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I've heard many discussions about rising home values in various parts of the city and someone always compares one neighborhood to another based on housing prices at a particular time.

But if there are any people old enough or with first-hand experience, can you describe what was Inman Park like when the very first $500k house sold? I know it definitely wasn't like it is today, but I'm sure it wasn't all that bad either. Around what year was that?

Same for Grant Park and Candler Park. When did the first house sell for half a million or more and what were the neighborhoods like at the time? Were they very different than how they are today? What were the schools, crime, and socioeconomic demographics like during that time in those communities?
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Old 06-20-2018, 08:38 AM
JPD
 
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I lived in Candler Park (as a renter in an apartment) when the houses started getting expensive. This was mid-'90s. When I moved to the neighborhood, houses in good shape sold for 2-300k. There were a LOT of run down and derelict houses, run down as in just about to fall over, and quite a bit of petty and serious crime. A dead body was found in Springvale Park while I lived there.

By the time I moved out of the neighborhood in 1999, many houses had been renovated and half a million was becoming the norm. But there was still a rough element to the neighborhood which is entirely gone now. The neighborhood back then had a very strong hippie vibe, which has been completely eradicated by yuppie families. The commercial strip on McClendon used to be some raggedy diners, a guitar builder, a recording studio, an arts collective, and a record store, and there were multiple street festivals every year right on the street in front of the stores. They'd pull in a flatbed and the guitar builder would play with his band. Now it's foodie restaurants, a high end wedding dress shop, an interior design store, and a frame shop for your art collection. The rag-tag street festivals have been replaced by corporate mega-festivals in the park. Quite depressing. I used to say if I could live anywhere in Atlanta, it'd be Candler Park. I definitely do not feel that way anymore.

Last edited by JPD; 06-20-2018 at 08:47 AM..
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Old 06-20-2018, 08:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPD View Post
I lived in Candler Park (as a renter in an apartment) when the houses started getting expensive. This was mid-'90s. When I moved to the neighborhood, houses in good shape sold for 2-300k. There were a LOT of run down and derelict houses, run down as in just about to fall over, and quite a bit of petty and serious crime. A dead body was found in Springvale Park while I lived there. By the time I moved out of the neighborhood in 1999, many houses had been renovated and half a million was very common. But there was still a rough element to the neighborhood which is entirely gone now.
Awesome insight. I wonder how the schools were viewed during that time.
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Old 06-20-2018, 08:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
Awesome insight. I wonder how the schools were viewed during that time.
Mary Lin's demographics changed quite a bit over the last couple of decades. Some of that may be due to redistricting, I don't know.

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Old 06-20-2018, 09:00 AM
JPD
 
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Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
Awesome insight. I wonder how the schools were viewed during that time.
I can't speak for the high school or middle school, but Mary Lin was already a well regarded elementary school before I lived there. As its reputation spread, the shift I described in the second part of my post is what resulted.
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Old 06-20-2018, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Inman Park (Atlanta, GA)
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I moved to my first house in Inman Park in 1998. If I remember correctly, you could still purchase a big original Victorian for $500K that needed to be gutted. I was in a new "town home/cluster home" that had a gate at either end of the private street. I think a lot of friends were happy that we lived in a gated "community". We never had any problems living there in terms of security. Of course there was lots of trash from DeKalb Avenue and the Inman Park MARTA Station.

In 2001 we moved to our second house in Inman Park and our current residence. Our neighbor had a glider rocker on her front porch that she had connected with a bicycle chain around a spindle for fear of someone stealing it off the porch. We would hear gun fire once a year coming from the apartment building down the street that had not been renovated. I don't think I have heard any gun fire in close to a year now. The condos across the street were just being converted and they had not all sold by the time we moved in.

Mary Lin has always been a good elementary school from the time I moved in the neighborhood. The only time we had anything stolen was around the time that we had a contractor do some work for us. I am almost positive that one of his workers came back and stole the pressure washer out of our storage shed. No one walking by the street could see that we had a storage shed in the backyard and you would have to be bold to walk down the driveway.

Of course we did not have as many restaurants to walk to back then but I have always felt that it was a safe neighborhood. Since all the houses are so close to one another, we all have a tendency to look out for one another. If a neighbor is looking for one of the children or dogs, one of us usually knows where they are!
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Old 06-20-2018, 04:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JPD View Post
I can't speak for the high school or middle school, but Mary Lin was already a well regarded elementary school before I lived there. As its reputation spread, the shift I described in the second part of my post is what resulted.
I knew someone who was teaching at Lin at the time (early-mid 90s), and she said she loved teaching there. She and her husband were both teachers just starting out, and bought in Candler Park (I think on Josephine)—they had been priced out of their rental in Inman Park. So, even though prices were starting to go up—middle class folks could buy something in decent shape if they wanted to. I think there were actually incentives for renovating in CP. But, Candler Park was changing fast, and by about 96 was pretty pricey. Grant Park was different, I think, although it may of had expensive parts it had cheap parts for a good while. I knew another more established teacher living in Grant Park, but they complained about the crime—I also *think* I remember her saying that she had both her kids learning instruments, so they could get into a better school than that they would have been zoned for (or something like that). Around 96, you could get stuff in Oakhurst and Kirkwood for under 100K—though parts of Oakhurst closest to Agnes Scott were not inexpensive—Everything in Kirkwood was cheap then, but it was the beginning of folks speculating on the area (I was outbid on two homes in Kirkwood—ended up in a condo just north of CoD, my brother was outbid on a home in Kirkwood and found a decent project in Oakhust instead).
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Old 06-21-2018, 07:31 AM
JPD
 
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Originally Posted by jeoff View Post
Grant Park was different, I think, although it may of had expensive parts it had cheap parts for a good while.
I lived in Grant Park right before moving to Candler Park. There were a LOT of rental homes in GP. Probably half the people I knew rented there. A lot of houses were subdivided into three our four units, and not well taken care of. This helped keep prices down.
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Old 06-21-2018, 07:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
I've heard many discussions about rising home values in various parts of the city and someone always compares one neighborhood to another based on housing prices at a particular time.

But if there are any people old enough or with first-hand experience, can you describe what was Inman Park like when the very first $500k house sold? I know it definitely wasn't like it is today, but I'm sure it wasn't all that bad either. Around what year was that?

Same for Grant Park and Candler Park. When did the first house sell for half a million or more and what were the neighborhoods like at the time? Were they very different than how they are today? What were the schools, crime, and socioeconomic demographics like during that time in those communities?
I love this question. I may be a bit too young to add any valuable insight on this, but I have heard that Grant Park began to change back in the 90s. As recently as early 00s when I was in high school, I had a friend who lived in Kirkwood with his grandmother. When I'd visit we had discussions about the visible changes starting to occur. Fifteen years later, it seems as though Kirkwood has caught up to Grant Park, at least in terms of prices.
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Old 06-21-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Historic West End
4,534 posts, read 4,283,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Chong View Post
I moved to my first house in Inman Park in 1998. If I remember correctly, you could still purchase a big original Victorian for $500K that needed to be gutted. I was in a new "town home/cluster home" that had a gate at either end of the private street. I think a lot of friends were happy that we lived in a gated "community". We never had any problems living there in terms of security. Of course there was lots of trash from DeKalb Avenue and the Inman Park MARTA Station.

In 2001 we moved to our second house in Inman Park and our current residence. Our neighbor had a glider rocker on her front porch that she had connected with a bicycle chain around a spindle for fear of someone stealing it off the porch. We would hear gun fire once a year coming from the apartment building down the street that had not been renovated. I don't think I have heard any gun fire in close to a year now. The condos across the street were just being converted and they had not all sold by the time we moved in.

Mary Lin has always been a good elementary school from the time I moved in the neighborhood. The only time we had anything stolen was around the time that we had a contractor do some work for us. I am almost positive that one of his workers came back and stole the pressure washer out of our storage shed. No one walking by the street could see that we had a storage shed in the backyard and you would have to be bold to walk down the driveway.

Of course we did not have as many restaurants to walk to back then but I have always felt that it was a safe neighborhood. Since all the houses are so close to one another, we all have a tendency to look out for one another. If a neighbor is looking for one of the children or dogs, one of us usually knows where they are!
Wow, 500K and still needed to be renovated. George in your honest opinion does this seem like the similar path of West End, Westview, and Adair Park?
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