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Old 04-05-2008, 08:14 AM
 
5,440 posts, read 5,026,023 times
Reputation: 1128

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ffej View Post
Coming from SoCal where everything is hardcoat stucco, I was a bit surprised to learn of its nasty reputation in Atlanta. In my search, I've seen several nice hardcoat stucco homes but have been advised from a few that I should stick to brick and hardiplank homes. It was explained to me that relocation companies won't touch them, and as such, are much harder to sale.

Not that I don't trust the advice I was given, but I was wondering what the general consensus is amongst others on this board. Would you consider a hardocat stucco home or is it not worth the added difficulty in resale?

Thanks!
The problem originated from poorly installed “synthetic” stucco; there wasn’t proper flashing and the stucco was buried into the soil. This led to water penetration; and once water gets behind the stucco, it is trapped and will rot out the studs and exterior plywood, not to mention termite damage from the moisture.

Hard coat, for the most part, doesn’t suffer from these problems, but it is stigmatized because of it.
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Old 04-05-2008, 08:24 AM
 
5,440 posts, read 5,026,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
While the majority of the problems were with EIFS +/- 10 years ago, there were some hardcoat stucco homes that had issues as well. The problem wasn't with the products themselves, but rather with the installation (untrained installers who didn't properly detail the waterproofing at windows, etc.). I'd have no qualms about buying a new home with either system, provided that it was installed by a contractor who was certified by the manufacturer of the system, and inspected by the manufacturer's local rep during the installation.

The problem with most construction issues is usually the installation process.
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Old 04-05-2008, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Vero Beach, FL
897 posts, read 2,610,770 times
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Most corporate relocation companies steer clients away from stucco. Over 10 years ago, we were told our company would NOT buy us out if we owned a "stucco" home - no ifs, ands, or buts.
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Old 04-05-2008, 02:40 PM
 
Location: East Cobb, GA
67 posts, read 276,788 times
Reputation: 19
Our realtor when we first started looking said although the hardcoat was better, we should still avoid stucco at all costs because resale was a big problem. We have since been given that advice over and over again by people here so we are glad we listened. I think most of the problem is in the local perception, not real tangible problems with hardcoat. However we looked at one hardcoat stucco home and our realtor pointed out several 'wet' spots (apparently that is a bad sign) and told us not to even look inside because there were problems with it.
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Old 04-05-2008, 04:49 PM
 
297 posts, read 1,422,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamato3BB's View Post
I think most of the problem is in the local perception, not real tangible problems with hardcoat.
So true. This says it all.
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Old 04-06-2008, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
13,396 posts, read 51,382,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scgraham View Post
The problem originated from poorly installed “synthetic” stucco; there wasn’t proper flashing and the stucco was buried into the soil. This led to water penetration; and once water gets behind the stucco, it is trapped and will rot out the studs and exterior plywood, not to mention termite damage from the moisture.

Hard coat, for the most part, doesn’t suffer from these problems, but it is stigmatized because of it.
Even real estate representives can get facts wrong-
EIFS stucco finish is not a "synthetic" stucco (where that moniker came from is beyond me). It is a cladding system. A progression of material layers that create the "system".
The combination of vapor barrier and styrofoam sheathing created a moisture trap. The intrusion of moisure came from any penetration in the "system" (i.e., doors, windows, pipes, wires, etc.) Without proper flashing AND proper yearly maintenance (caulking) it was inevitable that moisure would penetrate, get trapped, and begin to rot framing members.
As far as the termination of the stucco system at grade lines- this problem was over looked because the styrofoam sheathing was not "back-wrapped", or sealed to the concrete foundation. The unsealed styrofoam became a "gateway" for termites. It was subterrainian, dark, and moisture laden- just what every termites needs to find the framing members of a house.
In other words- the termites didn't have to build "tubes" as they would have in other situations.
So, there is moisture damage- rot. And there is termite damage- but the two don't necessary go hand-in-hand.
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Old 04-06-2008, 12:37 PM
 
Location: SCCL, Lancaster, SC
444 posts, read 1,513,428 times
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I have hard coat stucco on my house and have lived here for 10 years. When we moved in there was a problem with the stucco and an engineer advised us on the repairs and they were done. The reason for the problem was the house was not maintained prior to our purchase by the previous owner. Stucco is no different from any other house; you must maintain the windows, paint etc.

On the other hand the Synthetic Stucco gets moisture in between the framing and the stucco causes moisture problems. These too can be taken care of by maintenance. However, I would not recommend that you EVER purchase this type stucco.

K'ledgebldr is correct in his description.
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Old 04-06-2008, 10:40 PM
 
82 posts, read 304,961 times
Reputation: 15
FWIW, my realtor recommends against hardcoat stucco and will not let me even consider synthetic stucco. At this point, I'm back to square one on my search and will be looking for brick as it is my preference aesthetically. The nice stucco house that I thought was below market turned out to be priced just about right considering the repairs it required.

Thanks!
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Old 04-07-2008, 11:24 AM
 
57 posts, read 504,145 times
Reputation: 69
FFEJ, not to beat a dead horse if you've completely ruled out stucco, but if you can't find another house you like better, maybe you can get the seller to pay for the repairs. It's great to be in a buyer's market! When we bought our house it needed a new roof, and the seller footed the bill for it!
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Old 04-07-2008, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,123 posts, read 5,909,362 times
Reputation: 556
As I think was mentioned earlier, resale problems with stucco does not really have much to do with any supposed inferiority of the product or really, even, buyers not understanding the difference b/w hardcoat and synthetic....it is purely driven by market tastes. Stucco is just not a conventional siding choice natural to Georgia, and most people do not think stucco when they think of buying a house - most think brick, wood, or siding colonial or classic styles. Having said that, you can't always base every decision on resale - remember, you have to live in this thing too! Get what you like and make the most out of it.
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