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Old 04-17-2008, 08:37 PM
 
7 posts, read 129,841 times
Reputation: 16

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobKovacs View Post
While the majority of the problems were with EIFS +/- 10 years ago, there were some hardcoat stucco homes that had issues as well. The problem wasn't with the products themselves, but rather with the installation (untrained installers who didn't properly detail the waterproofing at windows, etc.). I'd have no qualms about buying a new home with either system, provided that it was installed by a contractor who was certified by the manufacturer of the system, and inspected by the manufacturer's local rep during the installation.
Exactly. Wilmington, NC is where it all started. Flashing, penetrations, and terminations are key when looking at stucco systems. Although a perfect scenario would involve a stucco contractor certified by the manufacturer and inspected by the mfg's technical rep during the install, most of the time these inspections are taking place on large commercial projects and not on typical residential installations. Again, the biggest advantage a homeowner or potential buyer can have is education on stucco. If you know what you're looking at you can use this to your advantage both when selling and when buying.
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Old 04-17-2008, 09:02 PM
bbk
 
Location: Gwinnett County
6 posts, read 16,201 times
Reputation: 10
Default I love my stucco home

There's definitely a difference construction wise in hard coat stucco and the others, but we just love our hard coat stucco home. If you thought you were going to live in a home less than 5 years, then I'd maybe choose either brick or concrete siding, but if you are buying a home to 'live' in it and like stucco, then go for it.

Stucco has a bad reputation in the Atlanta area because in the early 90s and before there was a lot of synthetic being used, especially in starter to mid range homes.

Most homes in the Atlanta area are now being built with only brick fronts and siding on three sides - why bother? Even in the higher priced areas. In some areas you'll find a house with 3 sides brick and siding on the back. Never could figure out why a builder would be so intent on saving a few dollars by doing that but they all seem to do it.
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Old 04-18-2008, 06:55 AM
 
Location: a warmer place
1,748 posts, read 5,015,102 times
Reputation: 765
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiGal View Post
Most corporate relocation companies steer clients away from stucco. Over 10 years ago, we were told our company would NOT buy us out if we owned a "stucco" home - no ifs, ands, or buts.
Our company told us the same thing. If we purchased a stucco home we'd be on our own when the next inevitable relo came along. I even spoke with some people here who told me flat out do not buy a stucco home you will never sell it. So we found a nice brick house....not as pretty but practicle for us. Good Luck
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Old 04-18-2008, 06:56 AM
 
Location: a warmer place
1,748 posts, read 5,015,102 times
Reputation: 765
Default One more thing

The stucco home we were looking at last January is still on the market.... a year and three months later.
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Old 04-20-2008, 04:43 PM
 
Location: City of Milton
63 posts, read 194,679 times
Reputation: 16
Yes Stucco of any kind has a bad rap here in GA. Being in Real Estate I have seen houses sit for a long time that have synthetic or Hardcoat. The main problem is moisture damage (and termites), if it isn't cut up off the ground you can run into all types of problems. A Stucco inspector can do a moisture reading to tell if there is any but if you are ever thinking of moving again it will be a hard sell. Many companies tell their employess to only buy brick or siding homes, that way the are not stuck with them when they relocate. Hardiplank is the best, but most homes have LP and have to be changed out. I had one client who took the stucco off their home and replaced it with hardiplank - it looked amazing, and of course it sold. But that is a lot of out of pocket to spend on the extrior when you may need it for interior upgrades and improvements. My neighborhood has several homes that have ripped out the stucco and have gone with the stone and shake look which is very in right now. Moderator cut: removed

Last edited by autumngal; 05-14-2008 at 06:31 PM..
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Old 04-01-2015, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Fayette County
1 posts, read 1,147 times
Reputation: 10
I purchased my first home in 2013 which is hard coat stucco. Unfortunately, I didn't research the issues with stucco before buying. The home is beautiful and fit my needs and price. The previous owner had a stucco bond on the house which transferred to me and I've kept it current. More than anything, I'm concerned about the shrubs currently near the house and whether planting so close to the foundation is advisable. The former owner laid weed proof tarps around some portions of the front of the house and covered them with layers of pebbles. It's pretty and gives the house a Florida feel, but my landscaper gets in a tizzy when he mows over a stray pebble or two. I've also noticed a few small rust spots at the base of a couple of windows.
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Old 04-02-2015, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,989 posts, read 1,594,716 times
Reputation: 2228
No, please do not buy a stucco home in Metro Atlanta. Even if the product has improved, the stigma remains. The stucco horror stories related here are still installed in the minds of many in the Metro. This is not Florida where stucco has been installed over concrete blocks for decades. There were news reports in the late 80's and early 90's about thieves breaking into houses with broom sticks through "faux" stucco walls, settlement cracks leaking on nearly new stucco homes resulting in costly (and at time unsalvageable) damage, and many others. Buy and older brick home, buy a hardiplank exterior, even the cheap "bendable" aluminum siding used on starter homes has a better reputation! I am sure that even "newbies" in our fair Metro have heard the horror stories; so many people I know have one.
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Old 04-02-2015, 06:48 AM
 
30,062 posts, read 27,729,161 times
Reputation: 10860
I have seen some beautiful hardcoat stucco homes and just about bought one myself. They have been standing for 75 years.
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Old 04-02-2015, 08:04 AM
 
1,984 posts, read 2,022,251 times
Reputation: 1968
Older stucco homes --pre 1940--are actually masonry/brick with stucco over it. My house was built in the 1910s. When the insurance estimator came out he was totally thrown for a loop. He said it would be impossible to replace, but also impossible to destroy. Think medieval fortress. So if you are looking at a stucco home in the older neighborhoods of the ATL, stucco is not a problem. Other problems like 100 year old plumbing and wiring --those are a bear, but the stucco is fine.
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Old 04-02-2015, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
1,989 posts, read 1,594,716 times
Reputation: 2228
We all agree that stucco over masonry is not the problem. Many "pre-war" neighborhoods around Atlanta have a few homes of this sort (scattered about in Ansley Park, Druid Hills, and other similar vintage communities). Even in my hometown of Morrow, there was the Hodges homeplace (probably built in the Cold war era) that was solid concrete like a nuclear bunker with a stucco looking exterior. That house, which was once on a horse farm with acreage, now sits in the middle of a "newish", mid-2000's subdivision off of Lake Harbin Road.
All of this said, I do not think the poster was referring to a historic property with stucco over masonry or concrete. I think the are referring to the plethora of homes built from the 80's - mid 90's in all parts of Metro Atlanta that had "faux" stucco that thousands have had nothing but trouble out of. These homes are the ones that have given all stucco a bad name throughout Metro Atlanta. These are also the homes that EVERYONE seems wary of and thus make even "good and Solid" built stucco homes of a certain vintage pariahs.
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