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Old 07-13-2019, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,970 posts, read 2,696,766 times
Reputation: 3077

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Currently better gas mileage and Mitch McConnel's cowardice to raise the federal portion of the gas tax (not raised since 1993 or indexed to inflation) means

$18 billion a year to fill the gap between expenditure and revenue.

But with a hopeful 2 trillion infrastructure initiative they'll be allocating 50 times this much for tunnels, bridges, rail improvements subway infrastructure reinforcements, Amtrak track work....

Here 's an interview:
https://www.governing.com/topics/tra...ing-roads.html
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Old 07-15-2019, 07:04 AM
 
30,429 posts, read 28,634,020 times
Reputation: 11212
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
Do you all use this forum to kill time?

I am asking them to not mount SINGLE SIGNS on both sides of America's widest freeways.

Sometimes signs do get removed off full spans over the roadway leaving only one sign.

But you all must be blind to not have any problem with with once attractive I-85 through Gwinnett which now looks like a gauntlet of metal obstructing the beautiful landscape.

Everywhere else in the country is trying to make things more attractive and here we're doing the opposite for no gain and unnecessarily.

Look at how nice Virginia built Express Lanes that are very similar to I-75 through Cobb. Perfect execution, clean, minimal, fitting for our nation's Capital.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxEFeylhDWU
Looks to me like Virginia's got a lot of signs mounted on trusses that go all the way across the road, including the very first one in this video.

Maybe there is some kind of federal regulation dealing with signs on interstate highways.
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Old 07-15-2019, 01:18 PM
 
5,608 posts, read 2,216,162 times
Reputation: 4260
Quote:
Originally Posted by evannole View Post
Would you rather these massive structures? (I suspect they were designed to withstand a hurricane.)

https://goo.gl/maps/tNo5iXF4XTN8Roz59

https://goo.gl/maps/vJx1wEchiztgbnd79

https://goo.gl/maps/q1cR6gULGaZdB3nA8
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
California and other Western states use there steel pipe things due to high winds sometimes.

I've never been a huge fan, they are big pipes. The ones that are just an L shape cantilevered over the road are tolerable and a less risky assembly that's one possibility that GDOT could use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattCW View Post
Those are a good deal more aesthetically pleasing than our gray metal truss structures.
They're called Monotubes and California actually does not have a great deal of them. Western Texas, New Mexico, some parts of Arizona (namely Phoenix), Nevada, Utah, Colorado and Idaho use them alot.

I personally prefer their simple design over the large gaudy trusses most states use but I question the reasoning for their design being due to wind, The reinforced trusses can probably withstand ALOT of wind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Looks to me like Virginia's got a lot of signs mounted on trusses that go all the way across the road, including the very first one in this video.

Maybe there is some kind of federal regulation dealing with signs on interstate highways.
There are federal regulations over what they call 'control signs' on interstates that every state has to abide by.


Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post

I think I hated Tampa the one time I visited partly because these things are painted white and don't look like standard, official infrastructure.

For me this stuff represents the state, it's the state speaking to motorists, and subconsciously, out-of-staters are judging and ranking each state compared to the others as to who represents America the best.

Our states are pretty much comprised of the same stuff, trees, billboards, exits and convenience stores, etc.

You can't help but rank how well each state does the same things for interstate travel.

But all 3 of those examples show signs that are visually level, with good typesetting and placement of the words on the signs, rounded corners that cost more, all in all, a respectable installation that bodes well for the state.

But for all there is to love about Atlanta, the first 5 gantries approaching I-75's Express Lanes are all crooked, and the left most lane's sign is mounted using stone-age engineering prowess.

This is what I want improved in Georgia. This is Hee-Haw-like in it's leaning, embarrassing to the state in my opinion.

IMG_0703 by Stephen Edwards, on Flickr

In addition to being crooked, this (below) is not easily interpreted in the few seconds drivers have to make decisions because 1) the signs are all the same size, the windy Hill sign should be smaller that the Interstate Exit signs which is the most critical. The words "Windy Hill Rd" are stretched out for no reason and would be more legible if kerned the same as the other words. And the type on white part of the Express sign is too small & too inconsistent with the other signs.
IMG_0706 by Stephen Edwards, on Flickr
In defensive of the signs, while it is clear some of them are lopsided. some of those photos were also taken at an angle which makes the positioning look worse than it really is.
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Old 07-15-2019, 02:25 PM
 
4,216 posts, read 9,420,350 times
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The freeways in Tokyo use trusses so that makes it ok in my book, lol.
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Old 07-15-2019, 02:34 PM
 
5,608 posts, read 2,216,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
The freeways in Tokyo use trusses so that makes it ok in my book, lol.
They also make people drive on the wrong side of the road
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Old 07-15-2019, 08:16 PM
 
4,216 posts, read 9,420,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
They also make people drive on the wrong side of the road
Also granted, their freeways aren't as wide (only 2 or 3 lanes of traffic).
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:13 PM
 
5,634 posts, read 3,893,372 times
Reputation: 3855
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
Also granted, their freeways aren't as wide (only 2 or 3 lanes of traffic).
Also, granted, they have a lot more controlled access highways than we do in town.


Atlanta is grey. Tokyo is red.

Also, granted, that's in addition to their large series of 4+ lane arterial roads in town.

Atlanta went the route of few wide interstates (which funnel together) instead of a more distributed system of smaller interstates, and few good arterial roads.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,970 posts, read 2,696,766 times
Reputation: 3077
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
Looks to me like Virginia's got a lot of signs mounted on trusses that go all the way across the road, including the very first one in this video.

Maybe there is some kind of federal regulation dealing with signs on interstate highways.
The express lanes program does specify some to be directly in the middle requiring full-span gantries.

But most are cantilevered with the pole far away from the roadway.

The minimal look and prefect installation of everything is something to be proud of as an American.

I will venture out to say that our freeways are becoming the ugliest, sloppiest, & most cluttered interstates in the whole country.

I'm only trying to improve Atlanta's overall aesthetics.

Yet so much energy has gone into contesting my one little cause.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,970 posts, read 2,696,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
They're called Monotubes and California actually does not have a great deal of them. Western Texas, New Mexico, some parts of Arizona (namely Phoenix), Nevada, Utah, Colorado and Idaho use them alot.

I personally prefer their simple design over the large gaudy trusses most states use but I question the reasoning for their design being due to wind, The reinforced trusses can probably withstand ALOT of wind.



There are federal regulations over what they call 'control signs' on interstates that every state has to abide by.




In defensive of the signs, while it is clear some of them are lopsided. some of those photos were also taken at an angle which makes the positioning look worse than it really is.
Well ride up I-75 Northbound approaching I-285 and see for yourself.

The photos aren't taken lopsided intentionally and you use Google street view to see them from another source.

In reality the roadway is sloped to shed water, either crowned in the middle (which I've never sensed on Atlanta's freeways), or sloped all in one direction (which I think is the case back from the Freeing the Freeways 80's construction).

That brings up another shortcoming, our freeways don't shed water adequately and therefore must use an asphalt mixture that's about 50% air so the water has a place to go in heavy downpours. This aerated mixture lasts only about half as long as normal asphalt.

You can hear the excessive noise from your tires on the old sections that are breaking down.

********

Every new freeway in California built in the last 20 years does use these monotubes.

I guessed that wind forces were the reason, but I think wind does preclude them from using span wire to hang traffic signals from.

The wind gets accelerated through the mountain passes, like during the Santa Anas (high pressure over Nevada, Arizona that pushes hot dry air from inland over Southern California which is opposite the normal onshore flow) to the point of flipping 18 wheelers over on their sides. Santa Ana conditions routinely have 70mph winds blowing hot dry our to see and supposedly cause people to behave strangely.

California's old overhead gantries are slim, horizontal box trusses which are the same in principle as what you see here mainly, only shorter and slimmer in depth.

Trusses welded to poles have a few more points of possible failure but a GDOT engineer told me that the bolts at the concrete footing are the most likely to fail and require periodic inspection.

I don't care about anything but reducing how much clutter is obstructing views of the trees and sky.

Y'all will nitpick this to death. If y'all are ok with the crooked structures and sloppy typesetting on the signs, then Georgia is delivering what the people want.

Anyone ever noticed the shoulder sign on I-85 for the GA400 Hospitality Highway with the words almost right-justified? Or the extra space between the 1 and 4 in "14th St." On I-75 Southbound at Northside Dr.?

My eyes go directly towards it.

And it's a joke to have a Hospitality Highway with shoulders full of trash and car bumpers, etc. that never gets picked up.

I will say that their standards are now higher than they've ever been though.

A GDOT District 7 employee returned my email last night about the 10th St. shoulder sign installed without shoring up the leaning post. She acknowledges the indifference of the crews doing the shoddy installations.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,970 posts, read 2,696,766 times
Reputation: 3077
Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Also, granted, they have a lot more controlled access highways than we do in town.


Atlanta is grey. Tokyo is red.

Also, granted, that's in addition to their large series of 4+ lane arterial roads in town.

Atlanta went the route of few wide interstates (which funnel together) instead of a more distributed system of smaller interstates, and few good arterial roads.
You need to show GDOT how beneficial exercises like this are in identifying the real shortcomings are for our region.

I'll bet you anything nothing as simple yet informative as this has ever been done at GDOT.

I say contact them and send this to them whichever way you can.

It can't hurt but could help.
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