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Old 04-17-2008, 12:01 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 36,381,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmtiger View Post
I don't think they are snobby.
Nor do I...I've lived in Decatur a long time and have yet to encounter "snobbiness"...
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Old 04-17-2008, 07:27 PM
 
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What y'all don't know about is how the "somewhat-old Decatur" view the "Buckheadfication, East Cobbfication, Alpharettafication, and Dunwoodyfication" of their city. When I say "somewhat-old Decatur," I'm talking about the people who moved there from mid 1970's to the mid 1990's. These people made Decatur what it is today. Supporting the schools from the ground up; bringing in, cultivating, and supporting Expeditionary Learning (only at Clairemont Elementary until 2004...and since 1992); moving there when it wasn't trendy; and other things, etc...

They are kind of victims of their own success. They love the rise in property values of course, but often talk "how things just aren't the same". They laugh about how you can now see Republican political signs on more front lawns.

Just a little info...carry on.
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Old 04-17-2008, 08:09 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 36,381,158 times
Reputation: 15465
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
What y'all don't know about is how the "somewhat-old Decatur" view the "Buckheadfication, East Cobbfication, Alpharettafication, and Dunwoodyfication" of their city. When I say "somewhat-old Decatur," I'm talking about the people who moved there from mid 1970's to the mid 1990's. These people made Decatur what it is today. Supporting the schools from the ground up; bringing in, cultivating, and supporting Expeditionary Learning (only at Clairemont Elementary until 2004...and since 1992); moving there when it wasn't trendy; and other things, etc...

They are kind of victims of their own success. They love the rise in property values of course, but often talk "how things just aren't the same". They laugh about how you can now see Republican political signs on more front lawns.

Just a little info...carry on.
That's a pretty interesting take on things, Aries...money does change things, even the culture of a neighborhood. I've seen it happen in Va-Hi, Morningside, and now Decatur...I knew all of these neighborhoods to be pretty middle class and tired at an earlier point in my life. Who knows what the future may hold for neighborhoods we deem undesirable now?
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Old 04-17-2008, 10:59 PM
 
14,401 posts, read 23,069,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
That's a pretty interesting take on things, Aries...money does change things, even the culture of a neighborhood. I've seen it happen in Va-Hi, Morningside, and now Decatur...I knew all of these neighborhoods to be pretty middle class and tired at an earlier point in my life. Who knows what the future may hold for neighborhoods we deem undesirable now?
I had a college friend who graduated from Grady in 1996. He said that (among the white kids) that you saw a marked difference between those that went to Morningside and those that went to Mary Lin. The Morningside kids were from homes in neighborhoods that never really went down during the flight era of the 60's, 70's, and 80's (Virginia-Highland, Morningside). The Mary Lin kids, on the other hand, were the children of pioneers who re-settled and renovated homes (in the 70's and 80's) in Inman Park, Candler Park, and Poncey-Highland when the neighborhoods were downtrodden and shoddy. You could see the pioneering spirit in the kids...as opposed to the "Buckhead-like" demeanor of the Morningside children.

I hear there is still a difference today in the kids (when they are at Grady and Inman)...but more than likely for more modern socio-economic reasons, demographics, and neighborhood culture.
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Old 04-18-2008, 06:54 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 36,381,158 times
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Growing up in NE Atlanta in the 60s and 70s, the mindset around choosing a neighborhood in which to live was so different ...the mantra was 'new, new, new'. Morningside and Va-Hi would not have been considered by the upwardly mobiles; these neighborhoods were largely populated by elderly residents (that were likely the original owners), Va-Hi in particular had a very 'transient' feel to it because of the cheap rents...the business district was largely boarded up until the late 70s.
Anyone 'on the way up' economically was scouring the 'new suburbs' for a home...in particular Dunwoody and Sandy Springs. Who knew? You could have picked up a house in the older neighborhoods for a song.
Ironically, Morningside was originally conceived as a high-end suburb along the lines of Druid Hills...you can see some of the original 'mansions' on Pelham. Then the depression hit, and the market for mansions went away...that's when it was re-invented as a more middle-class, 'bungalow' community.
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Old 04-18-2008, 01:36 PM
 
14,401 posts, read 23,069,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Growing up in NE Atlanta in the 60s and 70s, the mindset around choosing a neighborhood in which to live was so different ...the mantra was 'new, new, new'. Morningside and Va-Hi would not have been considered by the upwardly mobiles; these neighborhoods were largely populated by elderly residents (that were likely the original owners), Va-Hi in particular had a very 'transient' feel to it because of the cheap rents...the business district was largely boarded up until the late 70s.
Anyone 'on the way up' economically was scouring the 'new suburbs' for a home...in particular Dunwoody and Sandy Springs. Who knew? You could have picked up a house in the older neighborhoods for a song.
Ironically, Morningside was originally conceived as a high-end suburb along the lines of Druid Hills...you can see some of the original 'mansions' on Pelham. Then the depression hit, and the market for mansions went away...that's when it was re-invented as a more middle-class, 'bungalow' community.
Interesting. My college colleague grew up in Ormewood Park. He went to Annie West Elementary and then Mary Lin (open transfer)...(then Inman, Grady).

LovinDecatur...where do you think the next "hot-spots" of Intown Atlanta (or close to intown) will be?
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Old 04-18-2008, 03:19 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 36,381,158 times
Reputation: 15465
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
Interesting. My college colleague grew up in Ormewood Park. He went to Annie West Elementary and then Mary Lin (open transfer)...(then Inman, Grady).

LovinDecatur...where do you think the next "hot-spots" of Intown Atlanta (or close to intown) will be?
As far as what will happen in neighborhoods within the city limits, the future political climate will be a big factor in what happens. Fear for personal safety has IMO held many potential 'pioneers' back from many of the south and west side neighborhoods.

Some of the areas that I think will see gentrification over the next 10-15 years:

Reynoldstown - just on the other side of Inman Park, accessible to MARTA, and across the street from lots of amenities at the Edgewood Town Center...it's such a hot location.

Buford Hwy Corridor (in DeKalb) - it's just bound to happen, sandwiched as it is between great neighborhoods (Brookhaven and Dunwoody to the north, North Druid Hills and Oak Grove to the south).

Chamblee/Doraville - especially Chamblee, again by virtue of their location and proximity to MARTA and other great neighborhoods (Dunwoody, Brookhaven).

Midtown west of the Connector - largely industrial, but so centrally located...it's already happening there, but has a long way to go.
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Old 04-18-2008, 08:21 PM
 
14,401 posts, read 23,069,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
As far as what will happen in neighborhoods within the city limits, the future political climate will be a big factor in what happens. Fear for personal safety has IMO held many potential 'pioneers' back from many of the south and west side neighborhoods.

Some of the areas that I think will see gentrification over the next 10-15 years:

Reynoldstown - just on the other side of Inman Park, accessible to MARTA, and across the street from lots of amenities at the Edgewood Town Center...it's such a hot location.

Buford Hwy Corridor (in DeKalb) - it's just bound to happen, sandwiched as it is between great neighborhoods (Brookhaven and Dunwoody to the north, North Druid Hills and Oak Grove to the south).

Chamblee/Doraville - especially Chamblee, again by virtue of their location and proximity to MARTA and other great neighborhoods (Dunwoody, Brookhaven).

Midtown west of the Connector - largely industrial, but so centrally located...it's already happening there, but has a long way to go.
I agree.

Other areas as well (IMO):

1. Summerhill
2. Belvedere Park
3. Scottdale/Clarkston
4. Tucker
5. The Candler Road corridor of South DeKalb
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Old 04-19-2008, 10:59 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,125 posts, read 36,381,158 times
Reputation: 15465
Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
I agree.

Other areas as well (IMO):

1. Summerhill
2. Belvedere Park
3. Scottdale/Clarkston
4. Tucker
5. The Candler Road corridor of South DeKalb
Also prime candidates:

1) because it's so close to downtown and Grant Park
2, 3, 5) because eventually Decatur and Avondale Estates' success will spill over, and
4) I didn't include because IMO it's never really gone into decline, but the downtown makeover (and already great location) will bring a lot of positive change to Tucker in the next few years.
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