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Old 02-22-2021, 07:27 AM
 
1,773 posts, read 982,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
Research Triangle Park, NC has been recognized for IT for many years after IBM arrived decades ago, but it now has a smaller workforce than Charlotte whose recent rise is in fintech. The Raleigh-Durham region is now very diversified and a hotspot for start-up companies, pharmaceutical research, bio tech, smart-grid technology, and gaming developers. Lenovo's North American HQ is there also.

Atlanta's IT sector is larger than either of those two NC regions, and even before Google and Microsoft and Facebook were establishing big presences here there were over 150,000 employed in IT here in Atlanta.

It will get much bigger as those companies seek young talent adept with the new digital realm.

I wonder if Porsche has any regrets about relocating to Hapeville, though. Perhaps they love it. I don't know.
As Ronald Reagan once said "there you go again", making Atlanta more significant that it really is. https://connect.comptia.org/content/...cities-it-jobs
Austin, Texas
Dallas, Texas
Raleigh, North Carolina
San Jose, California
Charlotte, North Carolina
Seattle, Washington
San Francisco, California
Atlanta, Georgia
Huntsville, Alabama
Denver, Colorado
Washington, DC
Boulder, Colorado
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Columbus, Ohio
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Boston, Massachusetts
Baltimore, Maryland
Madison, Wisconsin
San Diego, California
Trenton, New Jersey



https://www.techrepublic.com/article...ing-to-indeed/

Top cities for tech jobs in 2020, according to Indeed
1) Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. ...
2) New York metropolitan area. ...
3) Seattle metropolitan area. ...
4) San Francisco metropolitan area. ...
5) Los Angeles metropolitan area. ...
6) San Jose, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara metropolitan area. ...
7) Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. ...
8) Greater Boston metropolitan area.
9) Chicago
10) Central Maryland



https://www.statista.com/statistics/...ost-tech-jobs/
Atlanta doesn't appear in this top 15 list either.
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Old 02-22-2021, 07:39 AM
 
Location: East Point
4,332 posts, read 5,374,517 times
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Personally I think Ingles would be a hit on the westside, but maybe not for the hip, high-paid tech workers. But it would be what the community there needs.
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Old 02-22-2021, 08:06 AM
 
1,797 posts, read 2,944,180 times
Reputation: 1027
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
It wasn't. The children that live off Boulevard have access to the newest, most innovative, and technologically advanced school cluster that APS offers. They have the opportunity to attend the same public schools that the 'rich' kids in Atlanta do. No expense is spared at these schools and the administrators and teachers are some of the highest paid in the state. So, his comment about not investing in schools was incorrect.
Right. And many take advantage of that opportunity and succeed despite the odds. But you only gave one example from one of the most coveted public schools in the district. To bring it back to the original topic, the Microsoft Expansion is actually in the Washington and Douglass Clusters.

Whether the opportunity is there or not, there is a big difference when you have a supportive and highly educated family advocating for you with resources to pour into their child's futures. Many students in the wildly disparate clusters of APS do not have that luxury. So your one-size-fits-all approach is not valid here. Remember when you said that APS teachers do not hold black students to the same standard of excellence as their white counterparts? Believe it or not, this happens all the time within Grady.

Go into Grady and ask them why it is considered the most segregated high school in APS. Then ask the minority parents how hard they have to fight to get their children into the AP classes. Then ask the faculty how reluctant the parents are to put their kids into classes with too many students of a "certain demographic" -- even when they are honors or AP classes.

This man was initially taking about mental illness, generational poverty, homelessness, drug-abuse, etc. And you are saying that APS employees are getting paid more than others so they should be responsible for "fixing" these issues? You think APS teachers are getting paid to sit around and chill? I have seen many educators willingly take less money in other districts because of the extra work that comes with being an APS employee. It takes a special person to step up to the plate and educate ALL the various types of children -- with various types of issues that are totally out of the school's control. Now don't get me wrong, not every minority at Grady or any other APS school is poor or underserved. But, as usual, you tend to try to drive home your points while totally ignoring so many other pertinent variables. I guess it is better to think of it as investing in the people more so than in the school.

Is what you mentioned the case in the Washington, Douglass, Mays, Therrell, Carver, and South Atlanta Clusters? But you shouldn't answer that question --- because you do not know what is going on in those schools, what the teachers and admins are doing, where the students are coming from, nor their challenges or successes. And again, in all those clusters I mentioned, students still succeed in the face of odds that I don't think you have even conceived.
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Old 02-22-2021, 08:16 AM
 
1,773 posts, read 982,130 times
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Originally Posted by Born 2 Roll View Post
That is an excellent point that Georgia state government does not seem to invest enough in South Georgia and rural Georgia.

But it is understandable that a part of the state like South Georgia might would get less investment than North Georgia because South Georgia (which in many areas has either a slower-growing, stagnant or shrinking population) has significantly less population than North Georgia, where the population has been growing so fast that the demand for services (like education) has sometimes seemed to outpace available resources.

But even with the obvious disparity between the larger state educational investments in faster-growing North Georgia and slower-growing South Georgia, it probably should be noted that South Georgia is not completely bereft of educational resources.

The USG (University System of Georgia) has state-funded campuses in the following South Georgia (from the Gnat Line on southward) locations:

> Columbus State University, Columbus, Georgia

> Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, Georgia

> Middle Georgia State University, Macon, Georgia

> Georgia College, Milledgeville, Georgia

> Augusta University (a major research university and one of the largest continuing public education investments in the state), Augusta, Georgia

> Georgia Southern University (a regional comprehensive university), Statesboro, Georgia

> Valdosta State University (a regional comprehensive university), Valdosta, Georgia

> East Georgia State College, Swainsboro, Georgia

> Georgia Southwestern State University, Americus, Georgia

> South Georgia State College, Waycross, Georgia

> Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Tifton, Georgia

> Albany State University, Albany, Georgia.


While the TCSG (Technical College System of Georgia) has state-funded campuses at the following South Georgia locations:

> Albany Technical College, Albany, Georgia

> Augusta Technical College, Augusta, Georgia

> Central Georgia Technical College, Macon, Georgia

> Coastal Pines Technical College, Waycross, Georgia

> Columbus Technical College, Columbus, Georgia

>Oconee Fall Line Technical College, Sandersville, Georgia

> Ogeechee Technical College, Statesboro, Georgia

> Savannah Technical College, Savannah, Georgia

> South Georgia Technical College, Americus, Georgia

> Southeastern Technical College, Vidalia, Georgia

> Southern Regional Technical College, Thomasville, Georgia

> Wiregrass Georgia Technical College, Valdosta, Georgia.

Are the state investments in postsecondary education outside of North Georgia perfect?

No. They are far from perfect, but the state investments in higher education outside of North Georgia at least seem to be adequate, if not largely competent and seemingly acceptable for a part of the state with many areas that are slow-growing, stagnant and shrinking as is the case throughout much of the country and the world right now.

A largely slower-growing, stagnant and shrinking area like South Georgia just simply is not going to generate the same level of investment as a much-faster growing area like North Georgia.

But it should at least be recognized that South Georgia has not been completely ignored as some might would have us believe and has even received a decent and even good amount of investment in postsecondary education despite a slower-growing, stagnant and shrinking population in many areas.
Looking from outside the state and assuming I'm a Fortune 1000 company not based in Georgia, I honestly believe the schools that have the stature to be recruited are:
UGA, GA Tech, Emory, Morehouse, Spellman, Clark Atlanta and more recently GSU.

Compare that to NC, a state of equal size:
UNC system (larger than UGA), NC State, Duke, Wake Forest NC A&T, Appalachian State, East Carolina, Davidson. i.e. more schools with profiles known outside of their home state.
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Old 02-22-2021, 08:24 AM
 
1,773 posts, read 982,130 times
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Originally Posted by CleverOne View Post
Its not about nore money ONLY but how money is used. Problem is with the government is they dont have effective quality control. They indiscriminately spend money whether its on something that is doing as it should but also as something is obviously not working.
The reason a lot of that is because of politics. Politicians can have a sound bite about how they got money for their districts for something in theory sounds great but when one looks at results its not the resukts are mediocre at best.

I always find it odd when people bring up the worst examples of government socialized resources using the worse examples like the Soviet Union when you have just as many better examples such as Germany, Sweden,the UK etc.

You say it all starts at home.DUH really?Who knew?So when social programs are cut that provide help to students with challenging educational issues that most likely are tied to income inequality as you call a buzz word,what do you expect will be the outcome?
The US throws money at issues because state governments have way to much control. If there was more of a national standard in education,i believe our school system would be much stronger.
Im just looking at news now and hearing how TX is one of the only states that opted out of the federal grid system for control over its own system. Now you see how awful things are there. One of the top 3 most important states on its knees.

If there was one standard in education many of our issues would be better.Income inequality would be lower. This is how its done in most developed countries and many of them out rank us in learning.
I strongly believe education is where it starts but not every kid has a good foundation to learn with many of them having to many obstacles. Its almost like a cycle. I do think kids in poorer neighborhood who tend to have single parents and come from broken homes need resources that address the lack of for lack of a better word"home training".
When you have no one to teach you how to live well among others,then you will have juveniles acting out. The answer is not to wait till they are adults and lock them up but spend money on resources early in a child like. When I say money I mean not meager gestures but as much money as it cost to incarcerate. In fact it would be far less than incarceration if they did.

You say look at results but look in the right place for results and you can see what and where it works to move forward
Opting out of Federal oversight isn't the problem in Texas (I live there and have lived in other states, including Georgia). The bad weather also cut power in some other southern states like Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee though not as long. The problem was cutting corners and preparing for a worst case scenario which this was with ALL 254 counties under a weather advisory. 90% of the ERCOT grid covers Texas but El Paso is on the western US grid. It was not affected because of that and because its the far southwest corner of the state where the weather's impact was less.

Where Texas/ERCOT failed was not implementing recommendations for winterizing the Grid that were made in 2011 following a similar, though not as debilitating, weather event occurred! Its not amount of base power but no access to it. Texas has built more capacity on a % basis since 2000 than any state in the Union (Dallas Morning News 2/21/21). But lack of wintering is the issue. Fix that and it won't matter. that the state is not attached to the Eastern or Western Grids.
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Old 02-22-2021, 08:48 AM
 
1,810 posts, read 760,777 times
Reputation: 1669
Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
Right. And many take advantage of that opportunity and succeed despite the odds. But you only gave one example from one of the most coveted public schools in the district. To bring it back to the original topic, the Microsoft Expansion is actually in the Washington and Douglass Clusters.

Whether the opportunity is there or not, there is a big difference when you have a supportive and highly educated family advocating for you with resources to pour into their child's futures. Many students in the wildly disparate clusters of APS do not have that luxury. So your one-size-fits-all approach is not valid here. Remember when you said that APS teachers do not hold black students to the same standard of excellence as their white counterparts? Believe it or not, this happens all the time within Grady.

Go into Grady and ask them why it is considered the most segregated high school in APS. Then ask the minority parents how hard they have to fight to get their children into the AP classes. Then ask the faculty how reluctant the parents are to put their kids into classes with too many students of a "certain demographic" -- even when they are honors or AP classes.

This man was initially taking about mental illness, generational poverty, homelessness, drug-abuse, etc. And you are saying that APS employees are getting paid more than others so they should be responsible for "fixing" these issues? You think APS teachers are getting paid to sit around and chill? I have seen many educators willingly take less money in other districts because of the extra work that comes with being an APS employee. It takes a special person to step up to the plate and educate ALL the various types of children -- with various types of issues that are totally out of the school's control. Now don't get me wrong, not every minority at Grady or any other APS school is poor or underserved. But, as usual, you tend to try to drive home your points while totally ignoring so many other pertinent variables. I guess it is better to think of it as investing in the people more so than in the school.

Is what you mentioned the case in the Washington, Douglass, Mays, Therrell, Carver, and South Atlanta Clusters? But you shouldn't answer that question --- because you do not know what is going on in those schools, what the teachers and admins are doing, where the students are coming from, nor their challenges or successes. And again, in all those clusters I mentioned, students still succeed in the face of odds that I don't think you have even conceived.

You are now deflecting. It was you who brought up "public schools in low income areas" I showed you how in APS the schools are like Taj Mahal's (not just the Grady cluster it is most of them with very few exceptions) with very highly paid administrators and teachers where no expense is spared and children no matter where they live have access to technologies and innovation that kids in other Metro Atlanta districts only dream of. How do I know this? I have children in the APS system. Have you been inside these schools? I have. Children are given every resource and opportunity to learn it is up to them to take advantage. You just want to play the blame game and act like even more $$$$ is needed which is laughable. The amount of money spent is bordering on the insane in APS no matter the school cluster. Money doesn't fix the problems you are talking about and never will. That is what you seem to not understand. Blaming or trying to shame people who do care isn't the answer either. I have children in the schools I know what is going on I don't need a lecture from someone who wasn't correct about anything in the post you made that started this discussion. The opportunity is there for APS children to succeed even more so than in significantly wealthy areas in the metro because so much money and resources are being spent. Nobody is going to be given anything my children included.
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Old 02-22-2021, 09:32 AM
 
1,797 posts, read 2,944,180 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
You are now deflecting. It was you who brought up "public schools in low income areas" I showed you how in APS the schools are like Taj Mahal's (not just the Grady cluster it is most of them with very few exceptions) with very highly paid administrators and teachers where no expense is spared and children no matter where they live have access to technologies and innovation that kids in other Metro Atlanta districts only dream of. How do I know this? I have children in the APS system. Have you been inside these schools? I have. Children are given every resource and opportunity to learn it is up to them to take advantage. You just want to play the blame game and act like even more $$$$ is needed which is laughable. The amount of money spent is bordering on the insane in APS no matter the school cluster. Money doesn't fix the problems you are talking about and never will. That is what you seem to not understand. Blaming or trying to shame people who do care isn't the answer either. I have children in the schools I know what is going on I don't need a lecture from someone who wasn't correct about anything in the post you made that started this discussion. The opportunity is there for APS children to succeed even more so than in significantly wealthy areas in the metro because so much money and resources are being spent. Nobody is going to be given anything my children included.
Again, you have only mentioned one cluster in any detail. A cluster that happens to be in the heart of Midtown. One can say the same for the North Atlanta cluster, which borders Buckhead. Low income students are thriving in the Jackson Cluster because of the school's intentional focus on equity and access that a previous poster mentioned.

But what about ALL the other clusters that make up APS? You make it sound like Grady is representative of the other 8 clusters that make up APS. It's not -- and most people know it. I'm sure you know a bit about the Grady cluster because you live there. That is what I would expect.

But you are talking about facilities. I am talking about actual teaching and learning and the populations of the students that attend these schools. As someone else already mentioned on here, the extra resources often go toward the wraparound services that many students in other schools simply do not need. I'm not saying that more money needs to be poured into the schools, I am agreeing with the previous posters who said the money that goes to prisons, etc. can go toward innovative programs to prevent these at-risk youth from going down that road in the first place. That's it. I'm not sure if that's necessarily the school's responsibility, while APS is shouldering a huge chunk of it as it stands. Do you see how these individual schools allocate their budgets and why? I do.

But to answer your question, I actually work closely within every school I mentioned. I literally work with the teachers and students within each of these schools. And my kids attend APS schools as well. When was the last time that you sat in some classes at Washington High School, or Dunbar Elementary, or Bunche Middle, or Douglass High, or Carver EC, or Brown Middle, or Therrell High. When have you ever spoken with the teachers, counselors, admins, or parents, for any of those clusters besides Grady and North Atlanta? Have you ever attended any of the parent meetings for any of those clusters/communities? Why would you? But I have -- frequently. So I can speak on what I know.

Again, there is more to the discussion than pretty buildings, money, and tech. And there is more to APS than Grady/Midtown High and it's feeders. I just don't think this "it's just bad parenting -- oh well -- survival of the fittest -- just lock 'em up" mantra is helping anyone. As I told you many, many times before, nobody is asking you or anyone for more money or any handout. But I want to point out the factors that you frequently and conveniently miss in these discussions. As usual, I know you will miss the point I am trying make, so I just want to put these points out there for the good of the group.

Carry on...

Last edited by equinox63; 02-22-2021 at 09:44 AM..
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Old 02-22-2021, 10:16 AM
 
30,701 posts, read 29,339,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
I showed you how in APS the schools are like Taj Mahal's (not just the Grady cluster it is most of them with very few exceptions) with very highly paid administrators and teachers where no expense is spared and children no matter where they live have access to technologies and innovation that kids in other Metro Atlanta districts only dream of.
That much is true. Very few schools (public or private) can match the facilities, technology and staff provided by APS.
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Old 02-22-2021, 10:25 AM
 
35,164 posts, read 32,649,255 times
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Originally Posted by ronricks View Post
It wasn't. The children that live off Boulevard have access to the newest, most innovative, and technologically advanced school cluster that APS offers. They have the opportunity to attend the same public schools that the 'rich' kids in Atlanta do. No expense is spared at these schools and the administrators and teachers are some of the highest paid in the state. So, his comment about not investing in schools was incorrect.
He said "[The state of Georgia doesn't] spend efficiently enough in areas that matter like healthcare for those with mental issues, homeless facilities, public schools in low income areas, improving regional universities and community colleges, and public transportation."

You then assumed that he was arguing for a big tax hike for Atlanta taxpayers as a solution which was the big leap in logic you made as his point was about inefficient spending by the state. Also your reference to one APS cluster with new schools doesn't constitute a serious counterargument at all.
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Old 02-22-2021, 10:38 AM
 
1,810 posts, read 760,777 times
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Originally Posted by equinox63 View Post
Again, you have only mentioned one cluster in any detail. A cluster that happens to be in the heart of Midtown. One can say the same for the North Atlanta cluster, which borders Buckhead. Low income students are thriving in the Jackson Cluster because of the school's intentional focus on equity and access that a previous poster mentioned.

But what about ALL the other clusters that make up APS? You make it sound like Grady is representative of the other 8 clusters that make up APS. It's not -- and most people know it. I'm sure you know a bit about the Grady cluster because you live there. That is what I would expect.

But you are talking about facilities. I am talking about actual teaching and learning and the populations of the students that attend these schools. As someone else already mentioned on here, the extra resources often go toward the wraparound services that many students in other schools simply do not need. I'm not saying that more money needs to be poured into the schools, I am agreeing with the previous posters who said the money that goes to prisons, etc. can go toward innovative programs to prevent these at-risk youth from going down that road in the first place. That's it. I'm not sure if that's necessarily the school's responsibility, while APS is shouldering a huge chunk of it as it stands. Do you see how these individual schools allocate their budgets and why? I do.

But to answer your question, I actually work closely within every school I mentioned. I literally work with the teachers and students within each of these schools. And my kids attend APS schools as well. When was the last time that you sat in some classes at Washington High School, or Dunbar Elementary, or Bunche Middle, or Douglass High, or Carver EC, or Brown Middle, or Therrell High. When have you ever spoken with the teachers, counselors, admins, or parents, for any of those clusters besides Grady and North Atlanta? Have you ever attended any of the parent meetings for any of those clusters/communities? Why would you? But I have -- frequently. So I can speak on what I know.

Again, there is more to the discussion than pretty buildings, money, and tech. And there is more to APS than Grady/Midtown High and it's feeders. I just don't think this "it's just bad parenting -- oh well -- survival of the fittest -- just lock 'em up" mantra is helping anyone. As I told you many, many times before, nobody is asking you or anyone for more money or any handout. But I want to point out the factors that you frequently and conveniently miss in these discussions. As usual, I know you will miss the point I am trying make, so I just want to put these points out there for the good of the group.

Carry on...



Sigh.....Nobody is guaranteed equal outcomes in life. Equal opportunity does not result in equal outcomes because we deal with individuals. Everyone is different. Different skills, different character, different intelligence, different work habits/ethic. Different desires and interests etc. You will have different outcomes. APS is giving all children yes even the poor ones the opportunity via nice new shining buildings or renovated buildings that are not lacking in money spent, technology, or innovation. While there are a couple of less than desirable facilities, almost every school is a fantastic physical building. Therrell, Benjamin Mays, Frederick Douglass, Booker T Washington, Carver, Hope...are remarkable facilities that have had tons of money poured into them. There are very few outliers in the system. These buildings are staffed by highly compensated administrators and teachers who are on average paid far more than their peers in the metro area. These are the factors that you conveniently miss.

APS, like the city of Atlanta itself is going through massive demographic changes and it seems that for whatever reason this upsets people that the public schools are being used by people who are moving in. To any sane person this is a good thing and promotes more diversity in a system that hasn't been diverse at all for decades. The reason we hare having this discussion is because your original premise was false. Poor children in Atlanta have the same exact access and opportunity that middle class or wealthy children do and no, more money is not the answer to fix the problems of the children who do not take advantage of the opportunity given to them. The "learning population" as you put it have more available to them than almost any other school system in the metro area not named city of Decatur or city of Buford. So just like you I am talking about "actual teaching and learning and the populations of the students that attend these schools" They aren't lacking for money, technology, innovation, or resources regardless of what school they are in. They have to be wanting and willing to take advantage of it. Being poor or even middle class doesn't mean you can't value education. That's a cop out that you seem to not be able to understand or want to admit to given the massive resources these kids have available to them.
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