Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-13-2007, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
2,290 posts, read 5,546,306 times
Reputation: 801

Advertisements

Would-be transplants and relocators should know that Georgia and some metro Atlanta high schools have some fairly low high school graduation rates. Only 54% of GA kids are graduating high school. The rate is higher in Fulton, Gwinnett and Cobb. But Dekalb County's graduation rate is also at 54%.

Please keep that in mind when considering your new Atlanta/Georgia location. Best of luck.

Report: About half of Georgia teens graduate | ajc.com (broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2007, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
58 posts, read 228,414 times
Reputation: 14
Hi. Unfortunately I heard this terrible statistic on this morning's news. What exactly is the problem?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2007, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Atlanta/DC
563 posts, read 2,774,354 times
Reputation: 299
My only issue with the report is the fact that the data is outdated. I appreciate the work put into the report, but why tell me about the 2004 graduation rate when various initiatives have been put into place since then?

Just my $.20
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2007, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, GA.
218 posts, read 1,189,394 times
Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by backfist View Post
Would-be transplants and relocators should know that Georgia and some metro Atlanta high schools have some fairly low high school graduation rates. Only 54% of GA kids are graduating high school. The rate is higher in Fulton, Gwinnett and Cobb. But Dekalb County's graduation rate is also at 54%.

Please keep that in mind when considering your new Atlanta/Georgia location. Best of luck.

Report: About half of Georgia teens graduate | ajc.com (broken link)

Part of the problem is the Georgia High School Graduation Test. I took it my senior year but only when Language Arts, Math, and Social Studies were required to graduate. The test comprises of Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, and Science. The Science is hard as hell. Many, and I mean, many, are failing Science. It is just terribly difficult. Lucky for me, I passed all parts although Science was not required. Starting in the year 1999, all parts had to be passed in order to graduate.

This test was started being given in 1993 where only Language Arts had to be passed, and gradually, as time progressed, they started adding more parts that seniors had to pass.

Let it also be known that most of the seniors passing in Fulton, Gwinnett, and Cobb are in the afluent areas of those counties (North Fulton particularly).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2007, 08:30 PM
 
3,972 posts, read 12,664,235 times
Reputation: 1470
While the graduation exam is a part of the problem, most shockingly is the number of GA students who don't even get to their junior year to take the test -- A huge percentage of the drop outs leave after their freshman year --

I think this happens for a variety of reasons -- in general, Georgia's schools have been weak and kids get behind. By the time they reach high school -- they feel hopeless and doomed to failure. Additionally, I think in many of the metro area's school districts especially there is a huge emphasis on college bound kids -- not everyone needs to go to college, especially at age 18 -- have you tried to find a plumber lately -- they make more than I do with a master's degree. But many systems have dropped the vocational programs...


Compared to the average state, Georgia requires not only more credits to graduate, but also more credits in the core subjects of math, English, science and social studies. High school remediation is rediculously expensive and I don't think most GA schools even try.

On the other side of the coin, I heard a demographer speak last year, who said that if the goal of keeping every student in high school until graduation actually is reached, this country will needs 100s if not 1000s of more high schools. Interesting, isn't it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2007, 09:06 PM
 
1,088 posts, read 6,343,001 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by lastminutemom View Post

On the other side of the coin, I heard a demographer speak last year, who said that if the goal of keeping every student in high school until graduation actually is reached, this country will needs 100s if not 1000s of more high schools. Interesting, isn't it?
That isn't really a surprise. My high school class graduated about 350 out of 900 freshman at the start (not in Georgia). My school would have been almost twice as big if all those kids had stayed in school. And my guess would be that maybe three out of the other nine other high schools in the district had higher graduate rates (maybe).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2007, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
2,290 posts, read 5,546,306 times
Reputation: 801
On the one hand, at least we can say that we're not Detroit. Their graduation rate (for 2005 I think) was about 25%.

That Dekalb County only graduated double that of Detroit is no cause for celebration. It means that high schools like Druid Hills, Chamblee and to a lesser degree, Decatur High, were the schools that kept the numbers from plunging to a Detroit level.

Bungalow girl asked what exactly the problem is. I, for one, don't the know the exact problem, but I know that there's a host of problems. First and foremost, when kids are dropping out of school, the parents are not involved in any meaningful way in that kid's education. Lack of parental involvement becomes apparent to the students; if mom or dad doesn't care that much, why should the kid. And when parents and students don't seem to care enough, then teachers are going to stop caring. We noticed this phenomenon at Sandy Springs Middle School of all places.

That's the Yin.

The Yang is that the parents, students and educators at schools that do graduate their kids, and who do academically achieve, have no vested interest in or concern for the students at failing schools. There are no creative ideas for cross-town success. No desire by neighborhoods and communities to cross-collaborate on innovative ways to make under-performing schools better.

DoveDiva raised an interesting point about the time frame; that it's basically old data. While that's true, the grad rates in some areas are so low that the problems are too ingrained for things to have turned around in only a couple years. Suffice it to say, an under-performing Lithonia high school in 2004 is likely still under-peforming in 2007.

What all this means--at least to me, a prospective business owner--is that fewer and fewer people are going to be prepared for real life occupations, careers and socialization. And Georgia's/Atlanta's economy and quality of life will suffer for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2007, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,123 posts, read 6,539,028 times
Reputation: 569
When I read things like this or hear people talk about "best schools" or what have you, I just laugh. I think we, as a society, have become so dependent on others to do a lot of the parenting work....maybe because now both parents end up having to work, or maybe it's just he "outsource" mentality that has filtered into the home (nannies, housekeepers, lawn men, etc.) The bottom line is this - we each are in control of our own child's destiny (to a point)...enough to where you instill the values and work ethic to make THEM want to succeed no matter what. If they have this basic drive and value, nothing will keep them from acheiving their goals. Find a school that has the AP classes available and the programs you would like your kid to utilize (or they are interested in) and let them go at it. The reason we have such a high drop out rate is because there are a lot of kids with parents who simply don't give a rat's **** what their kids do, as long as it does not inconvenience them, and that is the inconvenient truth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2007, 07:22 AM
 
Location: ga
985 posts, read 5,759,483 times
Reputation: 494
Default Also, meet CRCT standard is too low.

As we all suspect, CRCT standard in Georgia is way too low. For fourth grade, 87% of Georgia kids are considered proficiency according to CRCT test and yet only 26% of Georgia kids are considered proficiency according to NAEP test. For eighth grade, 69% of Georgia kids are considered proficiency according to CRCT and yet only 23% of Georgia kids are considered proficiency according to NAEP test. May want to use exceed CRCT score as standard instead of meet and exceed CRCT score when looking at the schools.

CRCT vs NAEP
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2007, 07:48 AM
 
1,755 posts, read 5,682,958 times
Reputation: 556
Well, AJC had an article a few weeks ago about scores/grades of the different ethnic groups. They had the scores and subject areas and I can't remember the numbers but I remember Whites/Asians do pretty well and the Blacks/Hispanics not so well.

Personally, I don't blame the schools. I blame the parents. I have two sisters who are teachers and they're tired of being strong armed by the Admins. I've heard from several teachers, wanting out of teaching.

One says she can't dicipline her kid's b/c everything time she sends them to the office, the principal sends them back b/c she doesn't want to hear the parents complain. She says the upper class parents refuse to believe their kids misbehave, are bad, or don't do their work.

The other has several students who have to go to the special 'Spanish' classes b/c they do so poorly and she can't do anything for them. Their parents can't speak English, she has to have a 'translator' at Teacher-Parent conferences b/c of this. She says most do so poor b/c their parents either don't care or don't understand what their child is suppose to be doing day to day. She considers her class more of a day care.

Oh yeah, both Cobb schools.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia > Atlanta

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top