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Old 09-11-2010, 12:29 AM
 
6 posts, read 22,194 times
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I am native from Ukraine. I have new house in Austin and I want plant some very fast growing trees (because I don`t wont to water my garden often)/ I need same trees what is growing fast and have good shade and blossoming. I want have Royal Empress tree , Tulip poplar tree and Catalpa tree.
1.Can I buy them in Texas shops (I don`t have credit cart to buy on-lain)?
2. write me, please, names and addresses of Austin`s nurserys with very polite peoples (because I don`t speak well English and don`t now well about Texas trees).

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Old 09-11-2010, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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What part of Austin are you in? Maybe we can suggest a nursery close to where you live. The soil changes between West and East Austin, so that may impact what you choose to plant, and a local nursery should have that knowledge.

I like the Natural Gardener in SW Austin: The Natural Gardener: Organic Gardening Headquarters

Or on the east side, Ted's trees: Ted's Trees

But I think most local nurseries will be friendly and accommodate you. They will also have more info on the best fast-growing trees for the area. I am not familiar with the specific ones you mentioned, but the nurseries will be the people to ask.

It's a good time to plant trees right now; they will work on establishing their roots over the winter, then start really growing in spring. Native ones will require the least care after they get established, but you'll need to take care of them (water, prune for desired growth) at least initially.

A great resource with very specific suggestions on trees which will thrive in Austin is: City of Austin - Grow Green Guide

Chinquapin Oak and Texas Ash grow fast. The Texas Ash is usually a very inexpensive tree, too (because, hey, they are easy to grow fast!).

If you are looking for privacy, there are also some large shrubs that can grow like trees to 12-15 ft high. Some of them are very fast growers, too.

Finally, since tomorrow is Saturday... all the gardening shows come on the radio (590 AM) Saturday morning. Might listen to get some tips there. You can also download them as podcasts.
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,791 posts, read 45,517,856 times
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atxcio gave you good advice, he pretty much said everything I was going to.

These brochures from the Austin Grow Green Guide show photos and provide detailed descriptions of trees recommended for this area, including numerous flowering species.

http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/growgreen...oads/trees.pdf

http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/growgreen...largeshrub.pdf

Last edited by CptnRn; 09-11-2010 at 12:02 PM..
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Corvallis, Oregon
653 posts, read 1,664,215 times
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I just clicked on one of the advertisements, that was shown on this page.

OK, not local, but shipping is free, and these trees do grow fast.
Quality Fast Growing Privacy Trees
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Old 09-12-2010, 07:59 AM
 
291 posts, read 745,821 times
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You said you don't water your garden, but you WILL have to water a new tree.
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Old 09-15-2010, 10:06 AM
 
6 posts, read 22,194 times
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I live Southwest of Austin near Dripping spring.
I wont know in what time they start sale and ship trees. I cold in some on-line nurserys and they told me what they start shipping after the 21st of September and locally shops like Wall-mart don't carry trees at all. In locally nersary they told me what they will sale trees in the middle of February. Is it try what season for trees start almost in November ? I don't understand way I need to buy trees almost in winter?
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Old 09-15-2010, 11:42 AM
 
7,537 posts, read 13,387,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lianita24 View Post
I live Southwest of Austin near Dripping spring.
I wont know in what time they start sale and ship trees. I cold in some on-line nurserys and they told me what they start shipping after the 21st of September and locally shops like Wall-mart don't carry trees at all. In locally nersary they told me what they will sale trees in the middle of February. Is it try what season for trees start almost in November ? I don't understand way I need to buy trees almost in winter?
Because if you plant in the spring, the summer will kill your tree.

My neighbors have planted bradford pear (not a fruit tree) and those things grow fast. In maybe 7 years they have a 2 story tree with maybe a 1.5-2 foot diameter trunk and a huge canopy. Downside is they lose their leaves in the winter.
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Old 09-15-2010, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Corvallis, Oregon
653 posts, read 1,664,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin97 View Post
Because if you plant in the spring, the summer will kill your tree.

My neighbors have planted bradford pear (not a fruit tree) and those things grow fast. In maybe 7 years they have a 2 story tree with maybe a 1.5-2 foot diameter trunk and a huge canopy. Downside is they lose their leaves in the winter.
I always thought that loss of leaves in winter was a genius design for a tree.
Planted in front of a window that gets a lot of sun, it shades in summer, and allows sun heat through in winter.
Here that is not as much advantage as further North, but it does get cold enough here, that letting solar heat through in winter, is still desirable.

And if it is a windy winter, the leaves will blow away, into someone else's yard.
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Old 09-15-2010, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
14,587 posts, read 32,154,762 times
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Bradford pears also have a very short life-span and will potentially get weak in a relatively short time (not sure, but would say in under 20 years). Also, their thick foliage can result in wind damage during severre wind/rain storms more easily than the sturdier and a little less full oaks.
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Old 09-15-2010, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Round Rock
481 posts, read 2,270,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainwreck20 View Post
Bradford pears also have a very short life-span and will potentially get weak in a relatively short time (not sure, but would say in under 20 years). Also, their thick foliage can result in wind damage during severre wind/rain storms more easily than the sturdier and a little less full oaks.
I used to work at a garden center and the tree experts called Bradford Pear Trees the 10 yr tree. It's usually the 10 year mark when storms rip off the weak branches. However, some people will plant Bradfords and some other slower growing trees at the same time. That way you have shade from the Bradford and then when they tank the other trees will have grown considerably.
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