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Old 08-21-2011, 11:52 AM
 
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To me, the summers get harder to deal with every year. I keep trying to figure out how I can avoid being in Austin from June-Sept, but I still haven't managed it.
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Old 08-21-2011, 03:24 PM
 
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I do love Austin but honestly, for me, it's not worth putting up with the length of brutal summers year after year, especially the lack of rain. Most people just learn to deal with it but I really don't want to live my life like that. There are so many beautiful , more temperate places to live! I'm currently eyeing Raleigh, NC The weather is WAY better year round and it's gorgeously green and the city itself is very similar to Austin, just on a smaller scale. Win!
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justanothercalifornian View Post
I do love Austin but honestly, for me, it's not worth putting up with the length of brutal summers year after year, especially the lack of rain. Most people just learn to deal with it but I really don't want to live my life like that. There are so many beautiful , more temperate places to live! I'm currently eyeing Raleigh, NC The weather is WAY better year round and it's gorgeously green and the city itself is very similar to Austin, just on a smaller scale. Win!
Just a note about Raleigh. It's really, really humid and the mosquitos are huge. They've had a bunch of 100 degree days - imagine that heat with 70% humidity. Is there any perfect weather place besides Hawaii?
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by posa269 View Post
Just a note about Raleigh. It's really, really humid and the mosquitos are huge. They've had a bunch of 100 degree days - imagine that heat with 70% humidity. Is there any perfect weather place besides Hawaii?

Yeah, I was going to say something about Raleigh...plenty of relatives there, Mom grew up in Smithfield(with Ava Gardner, who actually lived in Four Oaks) just a bit down the road. Yep, some sticky summers and a touch more winter than I care for. If people think Austin is too much about UT football, they should be in the Triangle during basketball season!

Speaking of Hawaii; spent my honeymoon on Maui about 10 years ago...rained every day for a week! Of course, sometimes, you just drive to another spot on the island to find another 'climate'.
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Old 08-22-2011, 05:57 AM
 
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First, a Californian doesn't belong in Texas, but if you HAVE to move to TX, do it around mid winter so you acclimate as the weather warms up. Don't use the air conditioner or just use it around 85 degrees and stay outside a lot. The reason people thought this summer was so bad is because they are always in AC and never acclimated. I guarantee that if you stay out in the sun full time and only use fans, 100 degrees will be a cake walk. People have lived with this kind of heat for millennia before AC was invented. We're just wimps today.

Also, learn to bundle up. In the middle of the summer, I was wearing boots, wool socks, heavy jeans, t-shirt and long sleeved shirt. This kept my body insulated from the heat.

BTW, I'm speaking from personal experience. I worked South and West Texas and didn't have any issues once I got rid of the AC.
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Old 08-22-2011, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamjeepr View Post
First, a Californian doesn't belong in Texas, but if you HAVE to move to TX, do it around mid winter so you acclimate as the weather warms up. Don't use the air conditioner or just use it around 85 degrees and stay outside a lot. The reason people thought this summer was so bad is because they are always in AC and never acclimated. I guarantee that if you stay out in the sun full time and only use fans, 100 degrees will be a cake walk. People have lived with this kind of heat for millennia before AC was invented. We're just wimps today.

Also, learn to bundle up. In the middle of the summer, I was wearing boots, wool socks, heavy jeans, t-shirt and long sleeved shirt. This kept my body insulated from the heat.

BTW, I'm speaking from personal experience. I worked South and West Texas and didn't have any issues once I got rid of the AC.
You raise an important point about dressing. You'll notice most construction workers are fully covered: their necks with scarves, work pants, long sleeved shirts, work gloves, etc... They kind of look like they are in the Middle East and there's a reason for that: the climate is similar.

The thing is, if you're working outside, you'll be cooler if you're covered up than if your skin is exposed to the sun. Basically a layer of sweat develops and insulates your body, forming a layer of cooler air, kind of like a swamp cooler. You are protected from the sun and the hot and dry wind. If you are a lighter skin tone this will help you avoid any burning.

For me, I tend to overdress in the winter so I like to dress down in the summer. But I don't work outside. If I worked outside all day, I'm sure I'd be dressing just like the construction workers, although I'd probably still wear a short sleeved shirt. For some reason I need some part of my body for sweat evaporation and my forearms have never been sunburned. Which means I'd have an extreme "farmer's tan".

Oh if you do want to wear a long sleeved shirt, the best kind would be a linen or very loose fitting cotton shirt that is "see through". This gives some sun protection but also allows air flow.

You can dress for the heat just like the cold. People live in 120 degree temps just fine in the Middle East. For me, I'm perfectly comfortable wearing my shorts or jeans, t-shirts, and sandals in the summer but if the heat really bothers you, considering covering up a bit and seeing if you are cooler. Just like in the cold weather, some people have to wear a coat when others are wearing a short sleeved shirt, in the heat some people can wear a tank top in full sun while others would need a long sleeved shirt to protect from the sun.
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Old 08-22-2011, 08:08 AM
 
Location: central Austin
7,232 posts, read 14,455,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
You raise an important point about dressing. You'll notice most construction workers are fully covered: their necks with scarves, work pants, long sleeved shirts, work gloves, etc... They kind of look like they are in the Middle East and there's a reason for that: the climate is similar.

People live in 120 degree temps just fine in the Middle East.

That is a bit of an over-statement. Only small parts of the Middle East ever experience those kinds of temps and they tend to be away from the historical population centers (Dubai and other Gulf states don't count because they are totally dependent on AC -- prior to AC the small pop. would pretty much move to higher elevations during the summer.)

120 is very hard on livestock, elderly and small children. August is NOT a high productivity month in the region. People suffer in those temps.

But you are exactly right about the dress and it does help (outside of super humid gulf areas).
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Old 08-22-2011, 08:09 AM
 
2,627 posts, read 6,019,390 times
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Originally Posted by posa269 View Post
Is there any perfect weather place besides Hawaii?
Coastal Southern California probably comes the closest that I've ever seen to "perfect" weather year-round. Doesn't Hawaii still get some fairly severe storms occasionally?
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Old 08-22-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Originally Posted by centralaustinite View Post
That is a bit of an over-statement. Only small parts of the Middle East ever experience those kinds of temps and they tend to be away from the historical population centers (Dubai and other Gulf states don't count because they are totally dependent on AC -- prior to AC the small pop. would pretty much move to higher elevations during the summer.)

120 is very hard on livestock, elderly and small children. August is NOT a high productivity month in the region. People suffer in those temps.

But you are exactly right about the dress and it does help (outside of super humid gulf areas).
Yes 120 is very extreme, but we are peaking at 107 which is common in the Middle East.
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Old 09-15-2011, 06:37 PM
 
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I moved from the DC area a year ago, and I really haven't had a hard time adjusting. I love the heat, I heard today that we might not get to the 100s again this year and I actually got sad. Sure 112 was hot, but I still ate outside NO triple digits again - say it ain't so!

But glad we **might** have some rain and the cooler temps hopefully will help the fire fighters.

Turns out I really love hot weather - I actually never knew. My parents live in Florida and I thought it was too hot there, but I think it's the humidity.

At hot yoga they tell you it takes 14 classes to start feeling better - so maybe sign up for some hot yoga and see if you feel better after 14 classes.

And find a place to live with trees - trees and shade make all the difference on a hot day.

I have decided that people are less stressed out here because the heat relaxes them I know I am less stressed out.

Good Luck.
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