U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-05-2011, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
9,247 posts, read 24,176,787 times
Reputation: 2824

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by migol84 View Post
I have no problem with sprawling towns that are less than the size of a million people. I think if people truly wanna get away from city life then living in a town like that would be the perfect choice. But spreading into a suburban area is a bad idea, imo.

To me, sprawl is like Highland's Ranch in Colorado. The whole area was built on a very big ranch, no real town small or otherwise was there originally. Everything was built from scratch. Castle Rock and Monument aren't very far away, but those are small towns in their own right. Many of the places people are calling sprawl are actually places that are towns around Austin. Buda, Kyle, Leander, Cedar Park, Round Rock, Bastrop, Elgin, Hutto, Taylor, Georgetown, Marble Falls, etc....these weren't places like Highland's Ranch that just popped out of nowhere.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-05-2011, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
9,247 posts, read 24,176,787 times
Reputation: 2824
Quote:
Originally Posted by migol84 View Post
I have no problem with sprawling towns that are less than the size of a million people. I think if people truly wanna get away from city life then living in a town like that would be the perfect choice. But spreading into a suburban area is a bad idea, imo.
I've spent a fair amount of time living in urban cores, and even though there are things I still miss about it, the things urban living couldn't give us were outweighed by what we got living a bit further out. We're not so far away from downtown that we can't get there whenever we want to and many of the things we need anyway, we get where we are. Plus, neither of us work downtown, so living there doesn't make sense. We'd only have a reverse commute if we did live in central Austin.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2011, 08:25 PM
 
6,951 posts, read 12,353,115 times
Reputation: 3542
Quote:
Originally Posted by love roses View Post
I'm only questioning the water usage thing. How do 10,000 people living in a high rise use less water than 10,000 people living outside of a city center in a house? Everyone will shower or bathe, water plants (it's possible to have patio/rooftop gardens), give a pet water, and drink water. So the water gets piped vertically instead of horizontally.....I don't get how that uses less water. Window washers will also use water to clean the outside of the buildings and maybe water will be used to clean the streets in front of the high rise.
maybe 1) there are a lot less lawns to water 2) there is one shared pool so there arent multiple pools to fill.

Also as downtown builds more towers they will take out existing buildings/parking lots. A tall building that can house 2000 people is simply less resource intensive than 500-1000 houses.

The cost to heat and cool a building is probably less than the equivalent number of houses because the surface area to volume ratio is so much better in a skyscraper.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Houston
471 posts, read 1,434,143 times
Reputation: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by love roses View Post
"As others have said before - Austin is going to grow whether you like it or not
Don't know about that - IMO if this nasty drought continues and the Edwards Aquifer continues to be drained of its contents at the maniacal pace as one of my geology profs told us about back in 1998, personally I don't see that growth continuing at the same pace you've seen the past decade. Btw none of this is "secret" information - it can all be found in a few seconds with google....heck anyone trying to take care of their lawn knows there is something ominous is going on.

Living here in Houston is already bad enough for me with all the cars, the sprawling subdivisions, the polluted air, the cars, the strip centers growing everywhere like a fungus, the ugly/flat surrounding countryside and all the freeways. Then throw in the literally stifling heat we've endured the past summer - worse than I've ever experienced and I've lived here for 30+ years - and all the dead trees & plants and animal life trying to get in our house in search of water (something I've never seen before) and that all adds up to me seriously considering moving elsewhere....and that "elsewhere" doesn't include Texas.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
294 posts, read 652,836 times
Reputation: 424
The city and metro have been growing at mostly the same pace for the last 80 years. I don't see that stopping anytime soon.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
7,564 posts, read 16,886,033 times
Reputation: 3792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lije Baley View Post
Don't know about that - IMO if this nasty drought continues and the Edwards Aquifer continues to be drained of its contents at the maniacal pace as one of my geology profs told us about back in 1998, personally I don't see that growth continuing at the same pace you've seen the past decade. Btw none of this is "secret" information - it can all be found in a few seconds with google....heck anyone trying to take care of their lawn knows there is something ominous is going on.
Austin doesn't get it's water from the Edwards aquifer. But SA does.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Broomfield, CO
1,445 posts, read 2,889,710 times
Reputation: 911
I couldn't have said it better myself. When it comes to mindless, faceless, sprawl, no state does it better than Texas!

Large Texas cities are entirely built on the basis of the availabilty of cheap gas. (yes, 3 dollars a gallon is EXTREMELY cheap for gas). People will sit in traffic in their gas guzzlers hours and hours every week just so they can have the freedom to leave work when they please (at their convienence). Meanwhile, causing great damage to the environment.

HOV lanes, message boards, ramp meters, and traffic sensors do help to a SMALL degree, but so much more needs to be done to clean up this number ONE polluting state in the nation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
Sprawl: what it means to me - cheap and nasty new construction without craft or design value. Dormitories for families. Bad land use: no mixed development - miles and miles of cookie cutter houses with retail all in strip malls in between, with cheapness the only criterion for building. Entirely autocentric: very pedestrian unfriendly, no bike lanes, no public transportation. No sense of a public good at all. No trees, the natural environment strip-mined to provided maximum profit for developers, no consideration of environmental or historic regional concerns in architecture or planning - one size fits all. Minimal infrastructure, one road in, one road out, minimal side walks, street lights. In short, ugly, stupid and short on civility. Texas has too much of it: the ugliest middle class housing in the developed world: homogenous, unimaginative, grotesque and destined to be slums.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 11:55 AM
 
6,951 posts, read 12,353,115 times
Reputation: 3542
Quote:
Originally Posted by eepstein View Post
I couldn't have said it better myself. When it comes to mindless, faceless, sprawl, no state does it better than Texas!

Large Texas cities are entirely built on the basis of the availabilty of cheap gas. (yes, 3 dollars a gallon is EXTREMELY cheap for gas). People will sit in traffic in their gas guzzlers hours and hours every week just so they can have the freedom to leave work when they please (at their convienence). Meanwhile, causing great damage to the environment.

HOV lanes, message boards, ramp meters, and traffic sensors do help to a SMALL degree, but so much more needs to be done to clean up this number ONE polluting state in the nation.

Here is a link to most polluted cities (by air quality)

Most Polluted Cities: State of the Air 2011 - American Lung Association

Looking at particulates, texas really only has houston in the list. California clearly has the most cities in the top so is probably the most (air) polluted state. Ohio looks like a close second.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,617 posts, read 30,319,179 times
Reputation: 7195
Sprawl - what I do after failing to land a jump while skiing....
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
294 posts, read 652,836 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin97 View Post
Looking at particulates, texas really only has houston in the list. California clearly has the most cities in the top so is probably the most (air) polluted state. Ohio looks like a close second.
Obviously the city is paying off the American Lung Association.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top