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Old 11-07-2011, 12:36 PM
 
6,942 posts, read 12,347,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin97 View Post
Here is a link to most polluted cities (by air quality)

Most Polluted Cities: State of the Air 2011 - American Lung Association

Looking at particulates, texas really only has houston in the list. California clearly has the most cities in the top so is probably the most (air) polluted state. Ohio looks like a close second.
Texas is neither the leader in per capita car ownership nor truck/SUV ownership.

Also here is some data that shows cars per capita by state

Figure 3-2. Rate of Vehicle Ownership by State, 2006 - Our Nation's Highways: 2008 - Highway Finance Data & Information - Policy Information - FHWA

Here is some data (2002) which shows per capita types of vehicles:
Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey - 2002 VIUS Data Releases

They dont have summary data so I just picked a few states that have more SUV ownership than Texas.

Texas has approximately one pickup for every 7 people and about one SUV for every 12 people.

Georgia has approximately one pickup for every 6 people and about one SUV for every 10 people.

Colorado has approximately one pickup for every 6 people and about one SUV for every 7 people.

Montana has approximately one pickup for every 3 people and about one SUV for every 10 people.
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Old 11-07-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,599,402 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
Sprawl: what it means to me - cheap and nasty new construction without craft or design value. Dormitories for families. Bad land use: no mixed development - miles and miles of cookie cutter houses with retail all in strip malls in between, with cheapness the only criterion for building. Entirely autocentric: very pedestrian unfriendly, no bike lanes, no public transportation. No sense of a public good at all. No trees, the natural environment strip-mined to provided maximum profit for developers, no consideration of environmental or historic regional concerns in architecture or planning - one size fits all. Minimal infrastructure, one road in, one road out, minimal side walks, street lights. In short, ugly, stupid and short on civility. Texas has too much of it: the ugliest middle class housing in the developed world: homogenous, unimaginative, grotesque and destined to be slums.
Do you know many people living in developments like that? Or do you see many? It seems that the master-planned communities (homes plus commercial, retail, mixed-use, biking/jogging trails, if trees were removed they are re-planted or new ones are planted) are much more popular these days.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin97 View Post
Here is a link to most polluted cities (by air quality)
Most Polluted Cities: State of the Air 2011 - American Lung Association
Looking at particulates, texas really only has houston in the list. California clearly has the most cities in the top so is probably the most (air) polluted state. Ohio looks like a close second.
I believe the foreign barges that come through the very busy Port of Houston play a large part in that. Once some solutions come up for that, things should improve further.
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Old 11-07-2011, 01:03 PM
 
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off topic.. but this is the fastest sprawling (growing) thread i have seen in past year..!!
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Old 11-07-2011, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,615 posts, read 30,311,035 times
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If you are talking strictly particulates, then there are several contributing industries along the coast: plastics production, carbon black, bulk mineral handling at multiple ports (Houston, Corpus, Port Arthur), and naturally occurring particulate from ocean salts.
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Old 11-07-2011, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by migol84 View Post
People tend to be a lot more rude and things can get a lot more hectic.
I don't think this is always the case. I grew up in Dallas which is obviously one of the most sprawling cities in America. I never got the chance to know as many people that live in my neighborhood as I have here in Chicago. When you are out walking around, riding the bus, the train, shopping in your neighborhood, etc, you start to eventually recognize and talk to your neighbors. In Dallas, for the most part, you might wave through your car window to your neighbors. Sure, you know you might know your direct neighbors, but I feel like urban living opens you up to more people.
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Old 11-07-2011, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,719 posts, read 26,788,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
I believe the foreign barges that come through the very busy Port of Houston play a large part in that. Once some solutions come up for that, things should improve further.
Barges cause particulate pollution? No. Particulate and most other airborne pollutants are created by manufacturing plants (such as refineries), power plants, and fossil fuel burning vehicles. Barges are pushed by diesel power boats, which do emit pollutants. But I don't think the barges are numerous enough, "dirty" enough, or close enough to be a big factor in Houston's air quality.
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Old 11-07-2011, 05:08 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,599,402 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
Barges cause particulate pollution? No. Particulate and most other airborne pollutants are created by manufacturing plants (such as refineries), power plants, and fossil fuel burning vehicles. Barges are pushed by diesel power boats, which do emit pollutants. But I don't think the barges are numerous enough, "dirty" enough, or close enough to be a big factor in Houston's air quality.
There was a study a few years ago, I believe that used infrared cameras, that showed they do cause more air pollution than originally thought. The foreign barges aren't regulated by the state. Anyway, this is all sort of off-topic to the thread.
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, Austin, Texas
3,781 posts, read 5,622,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by love roses View Post
But when residential towers are built all around Lady Bird Lake and the Lake is no longer open to the public, only residents and said towers have been built all around, then how is that saving the environment? I may be exaggerating a bit, maybe there would be a small park available to the public. With all the new residents being told that West Austin is the only part of Austin worth moving to, then where can the city expand, except into it's precious hills? Yeah, there are a few brave souls who go East (which is probably where most people should be urged to move) but even doing that is going to impact the environment in some way.


note: I was actually trying to answer one of migol's posts, but for some reason it didn't end up here....Oh, well.
The Hike and Bike Trail will not only be there but will be expanded with the passage of the last bond package. Also Waller Creek will be redeveloped once the flood mitigation measures are in place opening more public space between the hotels and condos along it. Waterloo park will remain along with a host of others. Actually parks will get more usage than ever before and I expect some developers to do set asides of open space to be a carrot for prospective residents.
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:37 AM
 
Location: san francisco
2,062 posts, read 3,473,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talkispoison View Post
I don't think this is always the case. I grew up in Dallas which is obviously one of the most sprawling cities in America. I never got the chance to know as many people that live in my neighborhood as I have here in Chicago. When you are out walking around, riding the bus, the train, shopping in your neighborhood, etc, you start to eventually recognize and talk to your neighbors. In Dallas, for the most part, you might wave through your car window to your neighbors. Sure, you know you might know your direct neighbors, but I feel like urban living opens you up to more people.
In a way, you're right. Yes, urban living opens up to a community as opposed to a sprawling city. But in all honesty, when things get more crowded and there's a lot more rush, people just "think" for themselves. They run in front of you and don't say excuse me... they hurry you up all the time. People here in San Francisco honk a lot... and I had some people from Chicago and New York say that they were surprised at how people don't honk a lot in San Francisco!! Go figure! Because when you compare it to cities like Houston, or Dallas there are tons of highways and freeways that people rarely have the time to honk. And I had a friend say that in Chicago everybody honks like its a language all of its own. I haven't experienced it first hand, but I can get an idea. I was literally amazed at how much people honk here in SF. A guy once yelled out the window at pedestrians as he was turning to get out of the way. The walk sign was on and this guy seemed to be sure that he was entitled to make that turn when he was supposed to yield.

I'm always baffled at how people get so antsy here in San Francisco about the most mundane things. Like some lady moving to the side because some guy was rubbing his shoulder, the guy freaks and yells at her, "excuse me! I didn't mean to rub my arm against you!!" I mean, seriously... what the hell!?!?

Maybe it's just San Francisco... i dunno... but coming from what all Chicagoans and east-coasters alike say, "San Francisco is chilled." hahaha There's not a single day... a single simple day (unless I stay home) here in SF that I don't see a fight, or some confrontation of some sort, or some person getting mad at me for not pouring his/her coffee right (i'm a barista) or some guy stomping down the street yelling at everybody. This goes without saying... you'll most likely find this in every urban environment.

For all that's being said, I understand what "pro-sprawlers" mean and I get why "urban" living is not entirely the "utopia" people say. Despite all that, I still prefer urban settings because I'd rather live, work and play in a smaller radius. Its cheaper and fun.
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:51 AM
 
Location: san francisco
2,062 posts, read 3,473,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin97 View Post
Here is a link to most polluted cities (by air quality)

Most Polluted Cities: State of the Air 2011 - American Lung Association

Looking at particulates, texas really only has houston in the list. California clearly has the most cities in the top so is probably the most (air) polluted state. Ohio looks like a close second.
eepstein likes saying jokes a lot. well, here's an even better joke. CA has 11 cities in the top 25 by ozone, 6 by yr round particle pollution, and 10 by short-term particle. Texas has only 2 in the top 25 by ozone, 1 in yr round particle and 0 by short-term particle. haha
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