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Old 11-08-2013, 01:44 PM
 
114 posts, read 327,037 times
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Any tips on changing the formal dining into a study? We won't be doing any construction , what do you all think of the idea? Would it look feasible? Appealing? All ideas are welcome!!
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,834 posts, read 10,360,745 times
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No need to have a formal dining room for a large % of modern families - as long as you have a decent size breakfast/kitchen area.

If feasible it might behoove you to close off the entry to said room with a French door so it can be a more separate quiet place.

I think our formal dining room (13'x15') is a waste of space, but Mrs. ScoPro keeps here grandparents' dining set there and doesn't want to get rid of it. We use it maybe 3 or 4 times a year for holiday family dinners. I think a 7' pool table would fit there nicely.


Last edited by ScoPro; 11-08-2013 at 02:10 PM..
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Old 11-08-2013, 02:22 PM
 
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Looks good though!
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Old 11-08-2013, 02:47 PM
 
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Ours is more a reading room/dining room approach. Big chunky table, comfortable straight back chairs, a light fixture that is more functional than fancy and a wall lined with bookcases.

Time for a holiday meal, simply remove the globe and whatever assortment of books and homework have accumulated, put down a tablecloth, flowers and away we go!
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Old 11-08-2013, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
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We did exactly that. The eat in area adjacent to the kitchen is plenty adequate for the 2 of us and I got a really cool table that expands to seat 12 if I ever need to host a big dinner. So, we took the formal dining area which is on the other side of the kitchen and made it our office area. We have two desks and a file drawer and bookcases and it works out great. It's right off the main foyer going into the house, so it works really well as an office.

I think a lot depends on if you need that "formal" dining room. If you don't make any changes to the room the next owner can make it a dining room or office as they see fit.
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:07 PM
 
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Thanks all , yeah we don't need the formal dining room hence the idea!
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
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The one we just left had floor to ceiling bookcases built in, so it really looked like a study/office.The white plantation shutters cut down on the 'formality' of the space, and the piano said "This ain't your grandma's formal dining room any more!"

Our current, much smaller 'formal' now has a cork floor, deep teal walls, white desk and a RED bookcase/shelving unit...definitely NOT a dining room look. Both have multi-paned French doors.

Changing the overhead lighting can make all the difference, too.
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
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Upon further review of ScoPro's post, we DID have another room in the former, larger house set up as a dining room...not sure if it actually WAS that...200 year-old table, side board and corner cupboard certainly said "formal dining', but we essentially used it to display the antiques and only had two meals in there in five years. IF there had been young kids in the house, that area could have been a play/toy room, I suppose. I've seen others in the neighborhood done that way until the kiddos got a bit older.
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,791 posts, read 45,097,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
No need to have a formal dining room for a large % of modern families - as long as you have a decent size breakfast/kitchen area.

If feasible it might behoove you to close off the entry to said room with a French door so it can be a more separate quiet place.

I think our formal dining room (13'x15') is a waste of space, but Mrs. ScoPro keeps here grandparents' dining set there and doesn't want to get rid of it. We use it maybe 3 or 4 times a year for holiday family dinners. I think a 7' pool table would fit there nicely.
I second the pool table! Sorry Mrs!




Hate that rug too, hurts my eyes.
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Old 11-09-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 25,995,563 times
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I say use the rooms however you want to, it's your home.

I know people who have a Master Bedroom upstairs, but use a downstairs bedroom instead... and versa the vice.

Even "accepted" uses for different rooms have changed over the years. I had an elderly uncle who transformed the mainfloor "parlor" of a 150 year old house on family property into a bedroom, so he wouldn't have to climb the stairs, and made the attached woodshed into a "great room" with TV, books, sofa, chairs, casual dining and office areas.

The only think I'd caution against is making permanent changes which could damage the resale value, perceived usefulness, or general appeal to the buying public. Long ago I moved into a small place in which the parlor, next to the front door, had been turned into a second bedroom, and the arched doorway to the dining room had been boarded off, leaving a connecting door to the foyer as the bedroom door, with curtains over the glass panels. For my use, however, I wanted to use the parlor as a parlor, and did not need the extra bedroom. Fortunately the boardup had been flimsily done, and it was easy to remove, but it took some repair work to make look right. Also fortunately I was able to see past the ugliness of the modification, because the place had been vacant a long time, but it was perfect for me.
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