U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-10-2014, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Pensacola, FL
147 posts, read 559,652 times
Reputation: 112

Advertisements

What happens when a city grows too fast? And at what point does it subside? I see all these articles about Austin being the #1 fastest growing city and how it's currently among the coolest and trendiest places to move. With all this praise (overrated or not), will it ever slow down? I'm already learning many of the downfalls in regard to the influx in people (ie. 35).

I understand that many Austinites feel the city is already growing too fast, but I wouldn't say dangerously fast yet, would you? I believe many feel this way simply because it's their home and they don't want the potential for anything "bad" to happen. But at what point is the speed of growth actually dangerous? What are the repercussions? Can Austin handle all these people? Is there substantial room for expansion? And perhaps this isn't even a real issue; I don't live in Austin so I don't know. I am curious, though.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-10-2014, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
3,624 posts, read 9,656,274 times
Reputation: 5476
I remember back in the 70's and 80's when the city quit issuing building permits because growth was so great. This is not a new topic and I don't see much has changed over the last 40 years. We get spurts and lags of building activity and hot areas that cool for a while and explode again.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
13,643 posts, read 30,346,625 times
Reputation: 7211
Austin has been growing at a similar rate for something like 100 years, if you look at it percentage-wise.....
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2014, 05:54 PM
 
2,180 posts, read 5,794,122 times
Reputation: 695
Quote:
Originally Posted by MedicalPartisan View Post
What happens when a city grows too fast? And at what point does it subside? I see all these articles about Austin being the #1 fastest growing city and how it's currently among the coolest and trendiest places to move. With all this praise (overrated or not), will it ever slow down? I'm already learning many of the downfalls in regard to the influx in people (ie. 35).

I understand that many Austinites feel the city is already growing too fast, but I wouldn't say dangerously fast yet, would you? I believe many feel this way simply because it's their home and they don't want the potential for anything "bad" to happen. But at what point is the speed of growth actually dangerous? What are the repercussions? Can Austin handle all these people? Is there substantial room for expansion? And perhaps this isn't even a real issue; I don't live in Austin so I don't know. I am curious, though.
I'm worried about the rising home prices. I mean in SW Austin, homes have appreciated 100K in two years in areas like Avana. It seems like there is risk involved in buying in there!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2014, 07:10 AM
 
49 posts, read 74,021 times
Reputation: 130
Lots of cities in the United States have had times where they grew faster than Austin.

In the 1890 census Los Angeles California had a little more tham 50,000 people. A mere 40 years later, in 1930 Los Angeles had over 1.2 million people.

From 1930 to 1970, Houston went from 290,000 to 1.2 million. In the 40 years since 1970 Houston has added right at a million people, give or take a few.

Chicago's population went from 298,000 in 1870 to 2.1 million 1910.

Detroit went from 280,000 in 1900 to 1.6 million in 1940.

From 1970 until 2010, Austin's population increased by approximately 540,000, from 251,000 to 790,000.

Austin is growing fast but not unusually fast or nearly as fast when compared with other big cities that have been big cities for quite a long period of time.

Last edited by mth1954; 01-12-2014 at 07:30 AM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2014, 02:04 PM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
11,431 posts, read 17,185,393 times
Reputation: 5224
Quote:
Originally Posted by mth1954 View Post
Lots of cities in the United States have had times where they grew faster than Austin.

In the 1890 census Los Angeles California had a little more tham 50,000 people. A mere 40 years later, in 1930 Los Angeles had over 1.2 million people.

From 1930 to 1970, Houston went from 290,000 to 1.2 million. In the 40 years since 1970 Houston has added right at a million people, give or take a few.

Chicago's population went from 298,000 in 1870 to 2.1 million 1910.

Detroit went from 280,000 in 1900 to 1.6 million in 1940.

From 1970 until 2010, Austin's population increased by approximately 540,000, from 251,000 to 790,000.

Austin is growing fast but not unusually fast or nearly as fast when compared with other big cities that have been big cities for quite a long period of time.
Yes, but they had a lot more room to build out and natural resources were plentiful. Water and land are finite resources. Expanding Austin more into the west is harder because of the terrain. The traffic and lack of infrastructure is another topic that has been heavily discussed on this forum.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 01:16 AM
 
403 posts, read 616,894 times
Reputation: 682
being on the road with the maniac commuters in Austin is dangerous

just crazy, stupid impatient drivers all around... the roll of dice is considerable

don't value life much? head on down to west Parmer at 6:00pm M-F
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 06:39 AM
 
Location: The People's Republic of Austin
5,184 posts, read 6,046,441 times
Reputation: 2559
Quote:
Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
Yes, but they had a lot more room to build out and natural resources were plentiful. Water and land are finite resources. Expanding Austin more into the west is harder because of the terrain. The traffic and lack of infrastructure is another topic that has been heavily discussed on this forum.
The terrain to the west is no harder today than it was when Cat Mountain, River Place, Steiner Ranch, Barton Creek, or a dozen more places were built. And in the other three directions, there is basically no limit. As far as water, the front page of Sunday's AAS featured just one creative solution. There are others. And finally, the infrastructure stumbling block has always been the City of Austin and a hardcore set of myopic voters. As growth moves beyond their ability to control it, look for that to be less of a problem.

The rumors of Austin's demise are greatly exaggerated.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 07:30 AM
 
2,602 posts, read 2,346,009 times
Reputation: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
Yes, but they had a lot more room to build out and natural resources were plentiful. Water and land are finite resources. Expanding Austin more into the west is harder because of the terrain. The traffic and lack of infrastructure is another topic that has been heavily discussed on this forum.
Austin is way less geographically constrained than many big cities (Boston, New York, Chicago : water).
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 08:58 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 1,952,713 times
Reputation: 3353
The only real limitations I can see are the issues surrounding water.

Other than that people will build on lots that were previously considered unusable, St John, USVI comes to mind, there are some harrowing driveways to otherwise wonderful villas with killer views and terraced gardens. Traffic will continue to snarl and people will adjust, leave earlier, leave later, tele commute a day or so a week...

Water.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top