U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-19-2016, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Sun City Texas
55 posts, read 110,077 times
Reputation: 53

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoPro View Post
We haven't driven through SC in maybe 15 years. Do they still build their houses to all look alike, or did they get away from that similar "military housing" style?
Many of the people living in Sun City are military retirees. It looks just like a military housing complex. I am sure that they feel right at home.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2016, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Sun City Texas
55 posts, read 110,077 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by austin-steve View Post
Yeah, I think that's it.

The first huge wave of Sun City buyers is also aging out, so there is some sort of transitional housing product going up nearby that moves people from independent in SC, to Assisted Semi-Independent Living, then straight to nursing care if needed after that, all in the same complex I believe. Someone out there told me that, I haven't researched it. But it makes sense that investor/developers would see a demand for it and provide the product.
Since opening in 1996 53 per cent of the houses have turned over at least once. The average annual turnover rate is 5.5 per cent. For statistic gurus, the annual geometric turnover rate is 5.32 per cent.

Since 2008 the turnover rate has accelerated to an average turnover rate of just north of six per cent.

A substantial portion of the turnover is a function of older people reaching an age where homeowner ship is no longer desirable for a variety of reasons. They are candidates for the assisted living centers that are popping up in Williamson County.

Since the get-go a significant number of people sell their house within a year or two of moving to Sun City. The community is not for everyone. In some respects it is bland. In addition, many people move here from the upper mid-west to escape the harsh winters. But after a year or two, they get to missing their children and grandchildren. So they sell the house and move back up north.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2016, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Sun City Texas
55 posts, read 110,077 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
What's included in the 1100/yr? Just curious. Like I said, my mom is checking out some places in Sun City at the end of the month.
The HOA dues are $1,090 per year, although they are likely to go up substantially in the not too distant future. Several factors are driving the increase in the HOA dues. A major one is the shifting of golf expenses to the homeowners.

The idea of a retirement community built around golf courses was conceived as early as the 1950s or 1960s, I believe.

Developers like Del Webb believed, rightfully so, that many of the baby boomers, who would begin to retire in significant numbers from 2000 on - early retirements, would be golfers. A house adjacent to or within walking distance of a golf course would appeal to them. It was a viable business model.

Unfortunately, golf is losing many devotees. And the impact has been felt by communities like Sun City Texas. Finding replacement golfers for the initial crowd that have stopped playing for a variety of reasons has proven to be a challenge. There simply are not enough people playing golf in Sun City to cover the costs. Since the developer is on the hook to cover them, he has found a variety of ways to shift some of the costs onto the homeowners, i.e. property taxes and insurance premiums on the golf courses; reserve fund requirements, etc.

The HOA dues buy a resident access to most of the common facilities, i.e. gym, swimming pools, pickle-ball courts, tennis courts, softball courts, bark park, social center, etc. But not to golf. It is a separate profit center, and a resident has to pay to play golf. In fact, the residents that don't play golf - that's more than 70 per cent of us - have been warned numerous times to stay off the golf courses unless we have paid to play the game.

Access to the common facilities can be limited at times. Clubs and/or teams - tennis, pickle-ball, softball, etc.- get the best times for many of the common facilities. So if a tennis player, as an example, wants access to the courts during the best times, he or she needs to join the tennis league. The cost is minimal; I believe it is less than $12 per season, but it is an additional cost.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2016, 08:42 PM
 
2,898 posts, read 3,600,844 times
Reputation: 3191
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPS1 View Post
Unfortunately, golf is losing many devotees. And the impact has been felt by communities like Sun City Texas.
That's one of the problems with HOAs to begin with - the idea that one must have these flytrap amenities into perpetuity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPS1 View Post
Finding replacement golfers for the initial crowd that have stopped playing for a variety of reasons has proven to be a challenge. There simply are not enough people playing golf in Sun City to cover the costs. Since the developer is on the hook to cover them, he has found a variety of ways to shift some of the costs onto the homeowners, i.e. property taxes and insurance premiums on the golf courses; reserve fund requirements, etc.
The developer isn't really on the hook longer than the developer chooses to be responsible. In a declarant controlled subdivision the developer/declarant can unilaterally amend restrictive covenants. This is frequently done years after people purchase - the restrictive covenants are amended to saddle homeowners with all sorts of additional costs, fees, and restrictions. Sounds like you may be paying for a golf course soon.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2016, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Sun City Texas
55 posts, read 110,077 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
That's one of the problems with HOAs to begin with - the idea that one must have these flytrap amenities into perpetuity.

The developer isn't really on the hook longer than the developer chooses to be responsible. In a declarant controlled subdivision the developer/declarant can unilaterally amend restrictive covenants. This is frequently done years after people purchase - the restrictive covenants are amended to saddle homeowners with all sorts of additional costs, fees, and restrictions. Sounds like you may be paying for a golf course soon.
You are correct. Although 70 per cent of the residents don't play golf, they are paying for it now. Most of them don't even know it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2016, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
11,712 posts, read 11,463,426 times
Reputation: 16083
We toured Sun City a couple of weeks ago. My mom and I really didn't care for the bland new floor plans and the cookie-cutter look :/ I swear, in one section all we saw was a line of front facing garages - the garage dominated the entire front of the house. Why does Pulte/Del Webb design such uninteresting looking homes?? They didn't always look like that - boxy and economy-looking. No trees to speak of even though Georgetown has tons of trees.

The spec home was open but undefined and uninspired. No fencing. Conversely, we toured Cottages at Abrantes and even though the homes were Craftsman knockoffs, they were different and efficiently used the space. Grand Haven did a good job, IMO. However, a plus for Sun City is all of the amenities/activities...so it's a tough decision.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2016, 08:20 PM
 
792 posts, read 476,946 times
Reputation: 3010
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
We toured Sun City a couple of weeks ago. My mom and I really didn't care for the bland new floor plans and the cookie-cutter look :/ I swear, in one section all we saw was a line of front facing garages - the garage dominated the entire front of the house. Why does Pulte/Del Webb design such uninteresting looking homes?? They didn't always look like that - boxy and economy-looking. No trees to speak of even though Georgetown has tons of trees.

The spec home was open but undefined and uninspired. No fencing. Conversely, we toured Cottages at Abrantes and even though the homes were Craftsman knockoffs, they were different and efficiently used the space. Grand Haven did a good job, IMO. However, a plus for Sun City is all of the amenities/activities...so it's a tough decision.
Why don't you take a look at the older homes in Sun City? They were built by Del Webb and are better built and have more interesting floor plans, curb appeal, varied designs, and mature landscaping. The new houses are Pulte and just aren't the same quality.

I bought here a year ago and looked at the older and new homes. Like you, I didn't like the cookie cutter look of the new homes crammed up next to each other all in a row, with the garage front and they all looked the same. Austere landscaping made it feel cold and uninspiring. So I concentrated on the older homes and finally found what I was looking for - with a lot of character and very solidly built. The two previous owners added their own upgrades and landscaping, and my neighborhood has many huge mature heritage trees. If you can find one that has had most or all things recently replaced, like the roof, A/C, water heater, water softener, etc., there will be far less maintenance you will need to do for many years.

As for no fencing... some homes do have the wrought iron low fences, but most don't. I didn't know how I would feel about that having had tall wooden fences previously. But I have grown to really love it. Without fences, the back yards all kind of run together and look like a golf course. All manner of wildlife roam freely and are lovely to see. Neighbors are very good about respecting each others privacy, and all the different yards have some individual, beautiful landscaping. The view out my back patio is like a park. Also remember that you will never have the cost of maintaining wooden fences, which can be considerable over the years.

I don't get the draw of the newer homes here. They're more expensive and built with less storage and smaller bedrooms. I'm happy with my decision to buy one of the original Del Webb homes, and my neighborhood feels homey and elegant. Remember - new is not always best.

Yes, it's a big decision! So much to consider. I wish you luck, take your time, and hope you find just the right home.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-18-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Sun City Texas
55 posts, read 110,077 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
..... I swear, in one section all we saw was a line of front facing garages - the garage dominated the entire front of the house. Why does Pulte/Del Webb design such uninteresting looking homes?
All of the houses in Sun City have the garage and driveway in the front of the house. The reason is cost. By placing the driveway and garage at the front of the property, the city does not have to build alleys. It is cheaper.

In Dallas, where I lived for more than 35 years, most of the older neighborhoods, as well as many of the newer neighborhoods, had alleys. My house had an alley running behind it. The garage was on the side of the house. The driveway could be accessed from the alley or the street.

My Sun City neighborhood is approximately 10 years old. When I moved in there were few trees. But most of the residents planted trees. All the houses came with shrubbery. Also, most of the houses came with some fencing, although not around the whole back yard. Many of my neighbors closed in their back yards with fencing, usually because they had or have a dog(s), and they wanted the fence to keep Fido in the yard.

I replaced the shrubbery with a few rose buses and a lot of cactus plants. They require little maintenance. I don't have any trees on my property. I don't want them. They require maintenance, and I have kept my property as maintenance free as possible.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2016, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Sun City Texas
55 posts, read 110,077 times
Reputation: 53
With a house in Texas you get at least three taxing authorities that can saddle you with property taxes: school district, city government and county government.

Buy the house in an HOA community, and you get another layer of bureaucracy that can get into your pocketbook. The HOA dues. They behave just like property taxes. Except HOA’s are not constrained by law as to how much and how they can extract money from their residents.

The HOA governance process is the biggest disadvantage of living in an HOA community. It is managed by rulebook readers who have zero customer service skills. Many of the rules are petty.

Anyone thinking of moving to an HOA community should check out the rules. Also, check out the governance processes. You may be shocked to learn what the HOA can do to the community’s residents.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2016, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
8,704 posts, read 17,659,204 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by austin-steve View Post
I understand the key issues as you've presented them. It also helps to know it's your first experience with an HOA. It's not for everyone. But sometimes it's easy to miss the benefits.

You picked Sun City. It wouldn't exist without an HOA. No HOA is without it's detractors. All are deemed poorly run by some portion of the members. All Board members take heat from complainers, which is why most HOAs have trouble filling the positions. Nobody wants to take the slings and arrows. That's how it is.


The HOA dues in Sun City was $648 20 years ago. It's gone up $22/year every year since then, to about $1,100/yr today. That's not a crazy increase. It's always been billed a "golf course" community, so the golfers have sway. But there are many non-golf amenities and reasons to live there that make it a good deal even for those who never golf.

Steve
There's a small del Webb community in league city, tx. I like the city but the neighborhood is literally surrounded by apartment complexes. HOA fees are $2700 annually and all you get for that is a gated community with an activities Bldg and a very small fitness room. And the property tax rate is 3.7% and then there's the required TWIA wind insurance for coastal counties.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top