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Old 06-05-2020, 09:46 AM
 
101 posts, read 33,826 times
Reputation: 195

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Gosh dang police chief speaking false platitudes. Lost a lot of respect for him.

https://austin.culturemap.com/news/c...ston-protests/
Art needs to take his OWN advice and to shut HIS MOUTH. He can start addressing the media about all the Houston thugs that have been going to Austin to rob and murder people:

https://www.fox7austin.com/news/3-ho...-store-robbery

https://www.kxan.com/news/local/will...till-at-large/

https://www.kxan.com/news/bank-juggi...ton-to-austin/

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-t...g-13216205.php

https://www.khou.com/article/news/lo.../285-600188155
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Houston(Screwston),TX
2,368 posts, read 2,673,708 times
Reputation: 2921
The first part of his statement I have no problem with but the clear political rhetoric he spewed about “Austin trying to tear up Houston” is some bull****. Every authoritative figure in every major and minor cities has thrown this “out of town or out of state” boogeymen narrative out there because they don’t want to admit how corrupt their police department truly is. They don’t want to face the reality that their own residents are fed up with Local systemic racism which could result in some partaking in property damage. Instead they’ll place the blame on others. That’s not to say that there isn’t agent provocateurs in the mix causing chaos but I know for a fact that most people ready to pop off are Houston residents. It’s no different when Houstonians and other cities were blaming widespread crime on New Orleans “refugees” or immigrants.

The Chief never showed this much compassion before when many Houston’s residents complained at city Hall about racial profiling and police brutality and misconduct. He might be more “progressive” and outspoken than other chiefs but he’s still about protecting the Blue wall and downplaying their screw ups till they get called out on it. The Mayor didn’t listen to the public either. They immediately sided with the police and its primarily because of the Union.

Austin is an easy scapegoat. I wouldn’t be surprised if people in Dallas are saying the same thing.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
11,480 posts, read 11,227,847 times
Reputation: 15704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swizzle Stick View Post
Austin is a popular enemy in Texas. It's more expensive, more educated, has higher income per capita, has more natural beauty, has better schools, has better jobs, and is generally more highly sought after than the other cities in Texas.

Austin lives its life the way it wants, and ignores the rest of Texas, while the rest of Texas is fixated on Austin for some reason. A perfect example is how San Antonio keeps latching itself onto us as the "San Antonio-Austin Metro" while Austin wants nothing to do with them. San Antonio wants us to start a pro sports team and create an international airport between us, because they want things they can't afford or financially support.
Eh.... this sounds like a real homer post.

It's not really true that Austin is generally more highly sought after than the other cities in Texas.

Those cities are seeing massive influxes of people as well because they are larger and honestly more cosmopolitan than Austin, have lots of big city things to offer, in the case of Houston an international presence, among other things. At my former firm, many applicants from other states ultimately chose Houston and Dallas. Additionally, our office had a problem recruiting Black lawyers because many chose Houston, followed by Dallas due to the sizable Black professional class in those cities.

Additionally, San Antonio absolutely does not want to latch onto Austin. I can't even fathom why you would say that. Are you from San Antonio? San Antonio is proud to be its own city, as it should be. It's rich in history, have some awesome places to visit (with the riverwalk of course being a stroke of civil engineering genius). I love that city. In fact, I love all the big cities in Texas, they are all different and unique in their own way.
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Old 06-05-2020, 10:15 AM
 
101 posts, read 33,826 times
Reputation: 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Eh.... this sounds like a real homer post.

It's not really true that Austin is generally more highly sought after than the other cities in Texas.
So you won't debate that it's more expensive, more educated, has higher income per capita, has more natural beauty, has better schools, has better jobs than the other cities in Texas.

Yet you say it's NOT more sought after than other cities. Interesting.

Not a homer - I moved here from Dallas, and I feel truly blessed that I have the opportunity to live in Austin. My husband was offered a job that would have moved us back to Dallas - it included a $40,000 raise, but he turned it down so we could remain in Austin. Money can't replace the QOL that Austin provides. Many people in this town feel the way we do and that is why Austin is expensive.
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Old 06-05-2020, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
11,480 posts, read 11,227,847 times
Reputation: 15704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swizzle Stick View Post
So you won't debate that it's more expensive, more educated, has higher income per capita, has more natural beauty, has better schools, has better jobs than the other cities in Texas.

Yet you say it's NOT more sought after than other cities. Interesting.

Not a homer - I moved here from Dallas, and I feel truly blessed that I have the opportunity to live in Austin. My husband was offered a job that would have moved us back to Dallas - it included a $40,000 raise, but he turned it down so we could remain in Austin. Money can't replace the QOL that Austin provides. Many people in this town feel the way we do and that is why Austin is expensive.
No, I don't think that Austin has "better jobs". That's totally subjective.

For schools, I find to be a wash. Both are "ok". I wouldn't call AISD exactly breaking new ground.

Expensive? That I'll give you, though again there's many areas in both cities that are just as expensive as Austin. Closer in areas especially. The gap is closing.

Ok, you're a transplanted homer lol. Either way, your post isn't very objective.

I've been here 16 years now, and Austin is nice all right, but I wouldn't vault it over other Texas cities. And of course there are those who feel like you, but there are also those who are enamored with other cities and find them to be great as well. Austin doesn't have a patent on exponential growth.

The main reason why I like and stay in the Austin area is that I don't want to live in a big megacity like Dallas or Houston. That's about it. I came from one, New York, and didn't want to move to another. Additionally, I moved here for love. I knew nothing about Austin or Texas in general and neither were on my radar before. I do love my house and my area though.
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Old 06-05-2020, 11:22 AM
Status: "Blasphemer of all Religion" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Houston, TX
2,606 posts, read 1,000,263 times
Reputation: 3537
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Eh.... this sounds like a real homer post.

It's not really true that Austin is generally more highly sought after than the other cities in Texas.

Those cities are seeing massive influxes of people as well because they are larger and honestly more cosmopolitan than Austin, have lots of big city things to offer, in the case of Houston an international presence, among other things. At my former firm, many applicants from other states ultimately chose Houston and Dallas. Additionally, our office had a problem recruiting Black lawyers because many chose Houston, followed by Dallas due to the sizable Black professional class in those cities.

Additionally, San Antonio absolutely does not want to latch onto Austin. I can't even fathom why you would say that. Are you from San Antonio? San Antonio is proud to be its own city, as it should be. It's rich in history, have some awesome places to visit (with the riverwalk of course being a stroke of civil engineering genius). I love that city. In fact, I love all the big cities in Texas, they are all different and unique in their own way.
Every major city in Texas pushes its own image to a degree:

Dallas markets itself as a larger than life place where extravagance reigns supreme
Houston markets its diversity, international flavor, food, and cultural institutions
Fort Worth markets its Texas and Western heritage
San Antonio markets its Tejano and Mexican heritage
Austin markets itself as a quirky and outdoorsy city thats liberal and crunchy

The thing about the way that Austin markets itself is that the translation becomes that its paradise for white liberals. I dont know that it means to do that, but Austin doesnt even try to make itself appealing to anyone who isnt a white liberal that loves outdoor lifestyle.

I feel like huge reasons why Austin is seen as unappealing to some minority residents is two fold:
1) Austin has implemented some of the most extreme forms of gentrification which has resulted in minorities being pushed out of their neighborhoods to make room for more white liberals
2) Tone deaf white liberalism. This can be seen in the city's self-congratulatory nature regarding how liberal it is while still being clueless about the reality of some of the actions the city has taken. I remember being there about 9 months ago and seeing a big mural celebrating Cesar Chavez's values in a neighborhood that used to be Hispanic but is now extremely white due to gentrification. That's a prime example of what Im talking of.

A black friend of mine once told me that whites and minorities see the term "progressive" in different ways. Austin is extremely progressive in causes that white people care of but has shown itself to be indifferent on progressive causes minorities care about. Houston is the exact opposite. Houston is extremely racially/ethnically progressive but at best moderate on causes white people value. Dallas is the middle ground between them.

In a way, Houston and Austin are the inverse of each other. Minorities and international residents flock to Houston but barely give Austin a passing glance. Whereas white people and domestic residents flock to Austin and dont seem to like Houston. Austin markets a crunchy, liberal, and outdoor lifestyle. Houston markets its diversity and cultural institutions.

Bringing it back to the comments of Art Acevedo, its important to not that the "shade" being thrown at Austin isnt political, its cultural. For better or worse, Austin is a liberal non-diverse white town at the edge of the scenic Hill Country and Houston is a multicultural diverse behemoth in a flood prone swamp. The leadership of both cities has the same opinion of Trump and the Republican party, but very different ideas on what it means to be progressive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Swizzle Stick View Post
So you won't debate that it's more expensive, more educated, has higher income per capita, has more natural beauty, has better schools, has better jobs than the other cities in Texas.
I wouldnt say it has the best schools in the state, no. Its hard to beat the quality of public education in the northern suburbs of Dallas.
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Old 06-05-2020, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
9,101 posts, read 9,091,930 times
Reputation: 8024
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swizzle Stick View Post
Austin is a popular enemy in Texas. It's more expensive, more educated, has higher income per capita, has more natural beauty, has better schools, has better jobs, and is generally more highly sought after than the other cities in Texas.

Austin lives its life the way it wants, and ignores the rest of Texas, while the rest of Texas is fixated on Austin for some reason. A perfect example is how San Antonio keeps latching itself onto us as the "San Antonio-Austin Metro" while Austin wants nothing to do with them. San Antonio wants us to start a pro sports team and create an international airport between us, because they want things they can't afford or financially support.
True, but “more educated” doesn’t necessarily translate to “smarter” or “common sense” all the time.
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Old 06-05-2020, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
11,480 posts, read 11,227,847 times
Reputation: 15704
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
Every major city in Texas pushes its own image to a degree:

Dallas markets itself as a larger than life place where extravagance reigns supreme
Houston markets its diversity, international flavor, food, and cultural institutions
Fort Worth markets its Texas and Western heritage
San Antonio markets its Tejano and Mexican heritage
Austin markets itself as a quirky and outdoorsy city thats liberal and crunchy

The thing about the way that Austin markets itself is that the translation becomes that its paradise for white liberals. I dont know that it means to do that, but Austin doesnt even try to make itself appealing to anyone who isnt a white liberal that loves outdoor lifestyle.

I feel like huge reasons why Austin is seen as unappealing to some minority residents is two fold:
1) Austin has implemented some of the most extreme forms of gentrification which has resulted in minorities being pushed out of their neighborhoods to make room for more white liberals
2) Tone deaf white liberalism. This can be seen in the city's self-congratulatory nature regarding how liberal it is while still being clueless about the reality of some of the actions the city has taken. I remember being there about 9 months ago and seeing a big mural celebrating Cesar Chavez's values in a neighborhood that used to be Hispanic but is now extremely white due to gentrification. That's a prime example of what Im talking of.

A black friend of mine once told me that whites and minorities see the term "progressive" in different ways. Austin is extremely progressive in causes that white people care of but has shown itself to be indifferent on progressive causes minorities care about. Houston is the exact opposite. Houston is extremely racially/ethnically progressive but at best moderate on causes white people value. Dallas is the middle ground between them.

In a way, Houston and Austin are the inverse of each other. Minorities and international residents flock to Houston but barely give Austin a passing glance. Whereas white people and domestic residents flock to Austin and dont seem to like Houston. Austin markets a crunchy, liberal, and outdoor lifestyle. Houston markets its diversity and cultural institutions.

Bringing it back to the comments of Art Acevedo, its important to not that the "shade" being thrown at Austin isnt political, its cultural. For better or worse, Austin is a liberal non-diverse white town at the edge of the scenic Hill Country and Houston is a multicultural diverse behemoth in a flood prone swamp. The leadership of both cities has the same opinion of Trump and the Republican party, but very different ideas on what it means to be progressive.



I wouldnt say it has the best schools in the state, no. Its hard to beat the quality of public education in the northern suburbs of Dallas.
You have a point with this post. Food for thought. I can tell you that each year we lose great Black talent to Houston and Dallas. There are people that clerked with us but when an offer was extended, they would choose other cities. Outdoors and such isn't that big of a deal for many of them but night life and the presence of a thriving AA professional class/circle is.
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Old 06-05-2020, 05:00 PM
 
1,887 posts, read 1,374,057 times
Reputation: 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
Every major city in Texas pushes its own image to a degree:

The thing about the way that Austin markets itself is that the translation becomes that its paradise for white liberals. I dont know that it means to do that, but Austin doesnt even try to make itself appealing to anyone who isnt a white liberal that loves outdoor lifestyle. ...
Excellent post.

It's common to see African American people post on Austin c-d saying they've received a job offer and wondering what it's like for black people to live in Austin, they've heard things, will they feel welcome, will their kids be accepted, will it be okay? Sadly, the response is often that the OP is reverse-racist for even asking such a question and their character is more important than the color of their skin, or some BS like that. I'll bet Houston c-d doesn't see a lot of that.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Seattle
7,046 posts, read 4,071,315 times
Reputation: 5298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swizzle Stick View Post
Austin is a popular enemy in Texas. It's more expensive, more educated, has higher income per capita, has more natural beauty, has better schools, has better jobs, and is generally more highly sought after than the other cities in Texas.

Austin lives its life the way it wants, and ignores the rest of Texas, while the rest of Texas is fixated on Austin for some reason. A perfect example is how San Antonio keeps latching itself onto us as the "San Antonio-Austin Metro" while Austin wants nothing to do with them. San Antonio wants us to start a pro sports team and create an international airport between us, because they want things they can't afford or financially support.
I can't argue with any of this but I will say Texas has too many sports teams to start any professional sports. I went to UT, not to insult the other Texas cities but most OOS students that I met said "the worst thing about Austin is it's in Texas" or "Austin is the only city I'd live in Texas. The rest is too liberal."
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