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Old 02-15-2009, 05:33 AM
 
Location: dripping springs,tx
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travis is low.
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Old 02-15-2009, 07:41 AM
 
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This is the thing that worries me the most about living in Texas long term. The drought has gotten worse over the years, and I think that with all the 'tinkering' we're doing to the enviroment (not really global warming, more like deforestation) it will only get worse.
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Old 02-15-2009, 08:54 AM
 
Location: central Austin
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do you mean the lake? I imagine that it is low. What really gets me is seeing hay on the back of big tractor trailers heading south on I-35. That means that a farmer or rancher somewhere is spending money (that they really probably can't spare) buying hay for their cattle in hopes that it will rain enough so that they don't have to send the foundation of their herd to slaughter.

Long term, Texas is better position to handle drought than Atlanta or Las Vegas but certainly it could put a limit on our growth.

Come on rain!
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Old 02-15-2009, 09:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by centralaustinite View Post
do you mean the lake? I imagine that it is low. What really gets me is seeing hay on the back of big tractor trailers heading south on I-35. That means that a farmer or rancher somewhere is spending money (that they really probably can't spare) buying hay for their cattle in hopes that it will rain enough so that they don't have to send the foundation of their herd to slaughter.

Long term, Texas is better position to handle drought than Atlanta or Las Vegas but certainly it could put a limit on our growth.

Come on rain!
I didn't think that Atlanta had a drought problem, being on a river (?) and so humid? LV is a mess, it disgusts me to see golf courses and so on in the middle of a desert. Greed and corruption (Calif. developer style...)
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Old 02-15-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
8,924 posts, read 15,566,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
I didn't think that Atlanta had a drought problem, being on a river (?) and so humid? LV is a mess, it disgusts me to see golf courses and so on in the middle of a desert. Greed and corruption (Calif. developer style...)
Unfortunately, that river(Chattahoochee) is fed by Lake Lanier, which is still at the lowest levels seen since the lake was developed in the 50s. The headwaters of the 'Hooch are about three feet long so the lake depends on rains flowing in from the relatively small basin. The agricultural drought has been relieved to a great extent but experts say it would take a 'couple of years of tropical storms' to replenish Lake Lanier. The drought is worse to the northeast of ATL and into the upstate of South Carolina and the mountains of North Carolina.

Our(Austin) river situation is quite different in that the rains well to the north and west are beneficial even when we get very little precip.
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Old 02-15-2009, 11:08 AM
 
8,240 posts, read 16,210,173 times
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Originally Posted by 10scoachrick View Post
Our(Austin) river situation is quite different in that the rains well to the north and west are beneficial even when we get very little precip.
Please let the LCRA know so that my water bill will reflect that. Oh, and ask if I can water my yard three times a week.
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Old 02-15-2009, 11:54 AM
 
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Comptroller Susan Combs Says Future Water Shortages Threaten Texas’ Way of Life

“By 2060, more than 46 million people could be living in Texas, and demand for water will increase by an estimated 27 percent,” Combs said. “According to the Texas Water Development Board, failing to meet this demand could cost businesses and workers in the state approximately $9.1 billion per year by 2010 and $98.4 billion per year by 2060.”



Perpetual Drought Projected for Texas As Early As 2021 - Science - redOrbit

Texas almost certainly faces a future of perpetual drought as bad as the record dry years of the 1950s because of global warming, climate scientists said in a study published Thursday.

The trend toward a drier, hotter southwestern U.S., including all of Texas, probably has already begun and could become strikingly noticeable within about 15 years, according to a study led by Richard Seager of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Drought conditions are expected to resemble the Dust Bowl years of the 1930s and Texas' worst-ever drought of the 1950s, Dr. Seager said. Unlike those droughts, however, the new conditions won't be temporary, the study found.

"This time, once it's in, it's in for good," Dr. Seager said.
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Old 02-15-2009, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,887 posts, read 41,569,558 times
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mimimomx3, did you see the charts and the historical drought data for Texas that I posted on the other thread where we're discussing this?

I don't deny we're having problems. I've just seen the "the sky is falling" reactions to normal weather fluctuations of whatever kind so often in my life that I think a little perspective is in order. It's happened before; sooner or later it WILL rain again. It's not unprecedented. ("Historical" and "unprecedented" aren't the same thing.)

Last edited by TexasHorseLady; 02-15-2009 at 01:23 PM..
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Old 02-15-2009, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX
8,924 posts, read 15,566,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
Drought conditions are expected to resemble the Dust Bowl years of the 1930s and Texas' worst-ever drought of the 1950s, Dr. Seager said. Unlike those droughts, however, the new conditions won't be temporary, the study found.

"This time, once it's in, it's in for good
," Dr. Seager said.
I'm not much of a gambler, but I would have to call Dr. Seager on this one...
a permanent drought???...after the rains of a couple of years ago??? I'll wager in favor of the 'Texas cycle' I've heard so much about!
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Old 02-15-2009, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, Austin, Texas
3,927 posts, read 5,991,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10scoachrick View Post
I'm not much of a gambler, but I would have to call Dr. Seager on this one...
a permanent drought???...after the rains of a couple of years ago??? I'll wager in favor of the 'Texas cycle' I've heard so much about!
Who knows the climate could change where we do have less annual precipitation and more extreme droughts when they do happen. I think we can handle it however as there is a lot of frivolous water usage that could be cut out as well as more efficient hardware that could be implemented.
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