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Old 08-26-2009, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,790 posts, read 43,819,885 times
Reputation: 9396

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For those of you who think you are letting your grass go dormant, if you don't give it any water it could be dead.

How to tell?

It's time to deal with dead or dormant grass / LJWorld.com

Quote:
How can you tell whether ugly brown grass is dead or just dormant? If you check a few of the individual grass plant crowns - the part just below the soil surface - and they crumble like thin brown paper, then yes, they are dead. If that crown is fairly hard and solid, then your grass is just dormant. A healthy lawn can stay dormant five to eight weeks with as little as 1/4 inch of water every two weeks.

How to Save Water with a Sleeping Lawn - wikiHow

Quote:
Understand a dormant lawn's water needs. Dormancy is the grass plant's natural response to survive periods of inadequate water. If the dormant lawn goes several weeks or a month without water, though, it typically will not recover, even when thoroughly watered later. The exact amount of water you will need to give your sleeping lawn needs depends on the temperatures, the humidity, and the amount of precipitation it receives naturally, but as a rule of thumb you should apply at least 1/2" (1,27 cm) of water after the initial 4-6 weeks of drought. You should then apply at least 1/2" (1,27 cm) of water every 2-3 weeks thereafter for as long as drought continues. If your summers are particularly hot and dry, as they are in the desert areas of the southwest U.S., for example, most grasses will require more water than this to survive. Buffalo grass and zoysia grass, however, generally require less water than bluegrass and fescue, and rye grass requires up to twice as much. Note that these waterings are only intended to keep the underground portions of the plant alive, and you typically won't notice any greening of the lawn above ground.

Water-Let Your Grass Go Dormant

Quote:
Most turfgrass plants can stay in a dormant state for at least 3-4 weeks without the grass dying (longer if the dormancy is induced by cold). If drought goes beyond the 4 week mark it is suggested that water be applied to re-hydrate the grass slightly and keep it alive. Water enough to wet the soil down to 5 inches. This little drink will not green up the grass in many cases but will keep it alive.
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Old 08-26-2009, 11:18 AM
 
3,788 posts, read 6,142,440 times
Reputation: 1756
I think it's both. Some of it near the house looks real nice! The rest, bleh...I think it's history. I'm taking it as a challenge. I'm going to look for some seed and try to reseed it.
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Old 08-26-2009, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
9,247 posts, read 24,347,073 times
Reputation: 2824
We just reseed the dead spots when the grass grows back.
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:10 PM
 
Location: The Republic of Texas
75,574 posts, read 39,127,525 times
Reputation: 17079
Ya, I found this out last winter, as it went into winter dormancy, and we had no rain.
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
1,305 posts, read 3,693,431 times
Reputation: 748
Mine is a lovely brown. It turns a lovely green in the winter/spring and then goes brown again for the summer/fall. I mean, why even bother to water?
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Old 08-26-2009, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Cedar Park/NW Austin
1,307 posts, read 2,797,672 times
Reputation: 877
Most of it is dormant but there's a patch on the strip between the sidewalk and street that I'm pretty sure is dead dead dead.
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Old 08-26-2009, 04:13 PM
 
362 posts, read 949,325 times
Reputation: 169
Keep in mind that St. Augistine is not sold in seed form; sod or plugs are your only answer.
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