Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 11-20-2009, 11:42 AM
 
3,423 posts, read 4,415,195 times
Reputation: 3632

Advertisements

This presentation graphically illustrates how the Austin area is faring in general as well as with respect to the rest of the state and the rest of the country on a county-by-county basis over in terms of unemployment. The authors are using unemployment as an indicator of the recession.

This Austin forum is chock-full of posts on such topics including the whys, wherefors, etc. regarding folks moving to Austin and from Austin. There are also posts comparing Austin to other locations, and inquiries/statements regarding employment opportunities or unemployment statistics in Austin versus other locations including location in the state and locations out-of-state including areas covered by the presentation.

Hit play to see a time-lapse sequence.

The Decline: The Geography of a Recession (http://cohort11.americanobserver.net/latoyaegwuekwe/multimediafinal.html - broken link)

Last edited by Trainwreck20; 11-20-2009 at 01:02 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-20-2009, 12:49 PM
 
1,961 posts, read 6,100,236 times
Reputation: 571
I'm moving to North Dakota, it looks all yellow up there :-)

Interesting video
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 01:46 PM
 
108 posts, read 253,476 times
Reputation: 26
very interesting vedio
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2009, 04:41 PM
 
97 posts, read 262,366 times
Reputation: 44
Thanks for sharing! That's brilliant!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2009, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Austin
2,522 posts, read 6,014,819 times
Reputation: 707
I notice a few things....the ever-spreading areas are where the people live, which is the eastern third of the country, and the west coast. The only area that is light is the inner west and great plains, in which pop density is the lowest. It is true that there are several states in this light range that are doing relatively well, like Utah, Nebraska, Montana, Wyoming, and the Dakotas, but population is nil in those few exceptional states.

Only state that truly counts and is still light is Texas. If this was a time-lapse of a Zombie/living dead strain spreading throughout the country, you would have to say that Texas is on the cusp of catching the curse, as it can't stay high and dry for long, 'less it succeeds(the Texas Constitution has a clause that allows this, BTW)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2009, 09:59 AM
 
3,787 posts, read 6,964,980 times
Reputation: 1761
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthecut View Post
Only state that truly counts and is still light is Texas. If this was a time-lapse of a Zombie/living dead strain spreading throughout the country, you would have to say that Texas is on the cusp of catching the curse, as it can't stay high and dry for long, 'less it succeeds(the Texas Constitution has a clause that allows this, BTW)


Um, so we're looking at the scourge coming with the plague unless Texas leaves the Union?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2009, 10:40 AM
 
4,710 posts, read 7,063,245 times
Reputation: 5612
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthecut View Post
Only state that truly counts and is still light is Texas. If this was a time-lapse of a Zombie/living dead strain spreading throughout the country, you would have to say that Texas is on the cusp of catching the curse, as it can't stay high and dry for long, 'less it succeeds(the Texas Constitution has a clause that allows this, BTW)
Wow, what a Texas-centric statement. I'm sure that a lot of states would take exception to "Only state that truly counts". Plus, if you look at the most heavily populated areas, they look just like the adjacent states, so are just as bad off. The only area that looks to be spared somewhat is the panhandle and some areas of west Tex. And once again, these look just like the adjacent areas north of it that are sparsely populated. It looks to me like Texas is completely within the trend, not an exception; thinly populated areas have lower unemployment, while heavily populated areas have higher unemployment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Austin
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:33 PM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top