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Old 02-03-2011, 10:29 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,138,920 times
Reputation: 11862

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Well, thank god for that! Must be where you're from and hang out because I certainly hear that accent here in Perth lots. Along with the high-pitched whiny voice. Worst place is when I'm on the train. There's no escape from it! I was thinking it might be a class/education thing except I find it seems quite common with teenagers and young 20-somethings. Almost like our version of that annoying "Valley Girl" talk in the US. There's even a few women at the place I work who talk like that girl in the video 20-somethings.



Unfortunately, I agree.
I don't hear the accent in that video much among those under 20 or so here, maybe a bit more in 'poorer' areas. The accent I hear is more like a cross between Aussie and 'Valley girl' as you describe, while the gal in the clip just sounded ott ocker (the 'val girl' type accent I hear among teenage girls is almost anti-ocker).
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:37 PM
 
Location: New Zealand and Australia
7,453 posts, read 13,442,165 times
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Not to me, I generally like the Aussie accent on a girl/woman.
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Old 02-03-2011, 10:56 PM
 
Location: In the Redwoods
30,409 posts, read 52,029,728 times
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I dunno... it's not the sexiest accent in the world, but I do like it! I've been to Australia, and found the men (I'm a straight woman) to be incredibly sexy overall - so obviously the accent isn't a turnoff to me. It probably depends on the locale & class-level, too, since there's a difference between "Muriel's Wedding" and how Heath Ledger talked. Know what I mean?

The only thing I do find grating is the dropping of 'R's, like they do in Boston. I always think of that scene from Days of Thunder, where Nicole Kidman is yelling "Let me out of the caaaah (car), Cole; let me out of the caaaah!!" LOL
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,782 posts, read 8,735,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
...The only thing I do find grating is the dropping of 'R's, like they do in Boston. I always think of that scene from Days of Thunder, where Nicole Kidman is yelling "Let me out of the caaaah (car), Cole; let me out of the caaaah!!" LOL
I know, R's are dropped from most words that end with them, but then some Aussies add them where they don't exist. There's probably a term for that. Trimac would know ?? Like the word idea. So often I've heard it pronounced i-dee-errr. And drawing as droaring, or I soarit for I saw it.
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Old 02-04-2011, 12:49 AM
 
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haha. nice accents. i especially like that she got the "Charleston, SC; Texas; and Brooklyn" accents.
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Old 02-04-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,115,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
^^ She's quite good, but Torontonians don't sound like that.
We're like 90% similar to her Californian or Seattle accent.
Her "Torontonian" is like a very-rural accent from Ontario, or some other part of Canada.
Fun video. She is really good.

Agreed about the "Canadian accent". More rural than urban.

Her Parisian accent sounds like an anglo when speaking French than a native Parisienne, but when she switches to English the way a Parisian would speak it, she is close to spot on.
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Old 02-04-2011, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,523 posts, read 2,868,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Fun video. She is really good.

Agreed about the "Canadian accent". More rural than urban.

Her Parisian accent sounds like an anglo when speaking French than a native Parisienne, but when she switches to English the way a Parisian would speak it, she is close to spot on.
And she says the s in Paris whereas the French always say "I'm from Par-eeh".
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Old 02-05-2011, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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If I have to pick apart the Aussie accent, what I find most odd
is "ah" sounds in words like "path", "grass", "master" and "banana."
That sound has always to my ears sounded a bit like an accident.
This is true of pretty much any British-influenced accent.

"Tomahto" is also peculiar; wouldn't say it's bad,
but it's definitely not an improvement over the American pronunciation.
(if someone were to be arrogant, suggesting their way is superior to mine)

There are some distinctly British and Aussie sounds that I do like,
but the ones I described are not included in my favourite sounds.

Last edited by ColdCanadian; 02-05-2011 at 07:44 AM..
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:04 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,138,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
I know, R's are dropped from most words that end with them, but then some Aussies add them where they don't exist. There's probably a term for that. Trimac would know ?? Like the word idea. So often I've heard it pronounced i-dee-errr. And drawing as droaring, or I soarit for I saw it.
'Intrusive' or 'Linking-R', applies when a word ending in a vowel or 'r' precedes a word beginning with a vowel. The example in Wells' book was 'KenyaR and Uganda', or 'the ideaR of it.' Would not apply if you just used the word 'idea.' An interesting thing Americans notice that most of us are completely oblivious to.
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Old 02-06-2011, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
187 posts, read 542,296 times
Reputation: 187
No offense to any of you, but I really find the Australian accent quite off putting on women. I just don't like the way it sounds. I hate any accents that make people sound stupid. Not to say that they are, but anyone with an Australian accent automatically to me sounds stupid. It's not just the Aussie one, also the Valley Girl accent and Southern US accents. Ughhh
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