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Old 01-24-2014, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
2,737 posts, read 3,163,204 times
Reputation: 1450

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Wait, do you know what the word 'intimidating' mean? Well there's no set way to pronounce vowels.

Unless it's a big bloke named Bazza who's out to get you...



Chopper Reid talks to Eric Bana - cutting ears off - YouTube
LOL - Actually British accents can be intimidating, the Glaswegian accent, the Northern Irish accent, the Geordie accent etc and numerous others.

As for nut cases British Prisoner Charlie Bronson takes some beating

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bronson_(prisoner)



Rev Ian Paisley in a good mood



Pizza Delivery is not easy in Glasgow


Last edited by Bamford; 01-24-2014 at 06:30 AM..
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Old 01-24-2014, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
60 posts, read 252,779 times
Reputation: 65
Being a British born Aussie who has lived in California for 19 years I think the OP's comment is both funny and ironic considering the US has some of the strongest (excluding Scotland/Nothern England) English accents in the world.
Indeed, the US decided it can't spell many words in the English language as they were too hard to remember (can't blame them somewhat) so they decided to either spell them differently or BOTH spell and pronounce them completely differently to the rest of the English speaking world, the most hilarious of which is ALUMINUM, an element on the periodic table!!

I would also assume the OP has not lived in the southern states of the US as often times you have no idea what some people are saying at all as they just make words up :-)
I lived in Dallas/Fort Worth for 3 years and those with a strong accent could not be understood 1/2 the time by people from California.
Also, just listen to a New Yorker, that accent is VERY abrupt.

I think one of the points the OP is maybe trying to make is that often times the "strong" Australian accent is basically "to the point" as often many British accents are but it is just a matter of what you are used to.

My "blended" accent is somewhat a mash of Oxford English/Australian which is usually entertaining (I work IT support and would get calls for help just so they could here be talk :-S ) but can also be taken the wrong way if I am trying to get a point across as I have always had a black mark on my performance reviews saying I come across condacending which has usually pissed me off because it is somewhat "descriminatory". I usually just brush it off though as I am an Aussie at heart so pretty thick skinned.

Also, if you have evey heard a real white South African talk it is a blend of English and Afrikaan and nothing like a strong Australian accent, other than they are speaking a version of English.

Finally, considering that the English language in the 21st century has so many words from other languages incorporated into it and that the internet has spread English even more than before, the English we speak today is what I often refer to as "Worldish" as it really is a blend.

Key is to enjoy life and accept peoples accents for what they are and not get offended or upset at the way someone talks, particulalry if American :-)
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Old 01-24-2014, 10:33 AM
 
14 posts, read 26,067 times
Reputation: 17
I can see how the Australian accent can get annoying. However, no American accent screams refinement or intelligence to me. It just doesn't sound smart at all.

And, agreeing with ukaussi... JUST SPELL LIKE EVERYONE ELSE!
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Old 01-24-2014, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Sydney
116 posts, read 169,619 times
Reputation: 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oz Train Driver View Post
That's funny, I had 2 people in separate places in the US say that they liked our accent and that is was a "smoother" version of an English accent.
This. When I was in the US I got non stop compliments on my accent. But had numerous people think I was British too
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:15 PM
 
9,326 posts, read 22,012,079 times
Reputation: 4571
Quote:
Originally Posted by yowps3 View Post
There's something about the Australian accent that I find very annoying. It sounds far too informal. And the pronunciation of words bears absolutely no resemblances to how they're actually spelled.

Sounds cheap and lacks finesse
So?

There are multiple Aussie accents? Which one?

I find the nasally American english painful, especially noticeable when i moved back from Adelaide, where people had lovely accents.
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Old 01-24-2014, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, QLD
3,674 posts, read 3,033,442 times
Reputation: 5466
I love it personally!
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Old 01-24-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Great Britain
2,737 posts, read 3,163,204 times
Reputation: 1450
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeaveWI View Post
I love it personally!
That might be so - but what do you think about the Australian accent.
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,786,339 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukaussi View Post
Being a British born Aussie who has lived in California for 19 years I think the OP's comment is both funny and ironic considering the US has some of the strongest (excluding Scotland/Nothern England) English accents in the world.
Indeed, the US decided it can't spell many words in the English language as they were too hard to remember (can't blame them somewhat) so they decided to either spell them differently or BOTH spell and pronounce them completely differently to the rest of the English speaking world, the most hilarious of which is ALUMINUM, an element on the periodic table!!

I would also assume the OP has not lived in the southern states of the US as often times you have no idea what some people are saying at all as they just make words up :-)
I lived in Dallas/Fort Worth for 3 years and those with a strong accent could not be understood 1/2 the time by people from California.
Also, just listen to a New Yorker, that accent is VERY abrupt.

I think one of the points the OP is maybe trying to make is that often times the "strong" Australian accent is basically "to the point" as often many British accents are but it is just a matter of what you are used to.

My "blended" accent is somewhat a mash of Oxford English/Australian which is usually entertaining (I work IT support and would get calls for help just so they could here be talk :-S ) but can also be taken the wrong way if I am trying to get a point across as I have always had a black mark on my performance reviews saying I come across condacending which has usually pissed me off because it is somewhat "descriminatory". I usually just brush it off though as I am an Aussie at heart so pretty thick skinned.

Also, if you have evey heard a real white South African talk it is a blend of English and Afrikaan and nothing like a strong Australian accent, other than they are speaking a version of English.

Finally, considering that the English language in the 21st century has so many words from other languages incorporated into it and that the internet has spread English even more than before, the English we speak today is what I often refer to as "Worldish" as it really is a blend.

Key is to enjoy life and accept peoples accents for what they are and not get offended or upset at the way someone talks, particulalry if American :-)
I would say there are phonetic similarities, but of course they're also very distinct. They're more related, for instance, than Australian and American which sound poles apart. All the Southern Hemisphere varieties of English (Australian, New Zealand, South African, Falkland Island) have some similarities but to a speaker of any it's generally really easy to tell them apart if they've got distinct accents. They're partly derived from the 'lower class' British accents of the 19th and 20th century, but in the case of South African, Anglo-South African, there's that Dutch/Afrikaans influence, and with Kiwi a bit of a Scottish influence. I'd say Australia also has an Irish influence.
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,786,339 times
Reputation: 2833
An Australian classmate and an American friend described the American accent on men as a bit effeminate, or '*****' to use the words of the former, haha. Of course it depends on the speaker, Vin Diesel or Shaq would give a pretty different impression than Bill Gates or someone. The Australian accent can sound pretty 'blokey' and masculine, I think it's partly due to the often rough, working class roots of the accent, but again it depends on the speaker.

Of course as an Australian it's nothing special to me, it's just 'how people talk.' Its alright, not as bad as some (I mean theres always Kiwi right? haha jk). Despite hearing it all the time on TV and movies it was kind of weird actually going to America and being surrounded by the American accent. Not just on TV, but radio and of course in real life. And Americans think they 'don't have an accent' .
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:15 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,740,900 times
Reputation: 560
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I'd say Australia also has an Irish influence.

Absolutely. It's a more Southern Irish Catholic influence on the Australian accent, while the US has strong traces of the protestant North/Ulster Scott.
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