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Old 01-24-2014, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,788,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
Absolutely. It's a more Southern Irish Catholic influence on the Australian accent, while the US has strong traces of the protestant North/Ulster Scott.
Yes, it's sometimes hard to determine whether features are from Southern Irish or Cockney or SEA accents. The 'oi' sound for the long 'i', like words like 'like' sound like 'loike' (as parodied on Kath and Kim) or the sort of dipththong 'been'.


Accent tag - Perth, Western Australia - YouTube

Here's my accent, btw.
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Old 01-25-2014, 03:21 AM
 
Location: SoCal
1,528 posts, read 4,231,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oz Train Driver View Post
That's funny, I had 2 people in separate places in the US say that they liked our accent and that is was a "smoother" version of an English accent.
The Australian accent is the opposite of smooth..
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Old 01-25-2014, 03:29 AM
 
Location: SoCal
1,528 posts, read 4,231,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
So?

There are multiple Aussie accents? Which one?

I find the nasally American english painful, especially noticeable when i moved back from Adelaide, where people had lovely accents.
The standard Aussie accent in Sydney. Not the hardcore outback accent.

-Brekky, Maccus, Arvo, Smoko, Compo, Chewie & of coarse Chuck a Sickie

Such annoying language Aussie is.

And I hate how 'water' is pronounced. 'WADAH'
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Old 01-25-2014, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
332 posts, read 498,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yowps3 View Post
The Australian accent is the opposite of smooth..
Did you just come here to tell us that you don't like the Aussie accent? And? Many people find the American accent nasally and whiny. Different people, different preferences.

Out of curiosity, how many different Australian accents have you heard? What do you consider to be a general Australian accent?
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Old 01-25-2014, 03:39 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
332 posts, read 498,191 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yowps3 View Post
The standard Aussie accent in Sydney. Not the hardcore outback accent.

-Brekky, Maccus, Arvo, Smoko, Compo, Chewie & of coarse Chuck a Sickie

Such annoying language Aussie is.

And I hate how 'water' is pronounced. 'WADAH'
I don't know anyone who says "WADAH".

When did you live in Sydney? Which area did you live in?
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Old 01-26-2014, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia
124 posts, read 196,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yowps3 View Post
The standard Aussie accent in Sydney. Not the hardcore outback accent.

-Brekky, Maccus, Arvo, Smoko, Compo, Chewie & of coarse Chuck a Sickie

Such annoying language Aussie is.

And I hate how 'water' is pronounced. 'WADAH'
You're just used to the American way of using the longest version of a word to describe something. You'll find many of our shortened words are shared with the 'poms'.

Also, I'm not aware an outback accent. Given that virtually nobody lives in the outback, I'd be highly surprised to find such a thing.

Being in Sydney would expose you to a lot of immigrants, people raised by immigrants or people who grew up with them. Those people will generally speak in a way that exaggerates the wrong words or sounds in a sentence. That is something which I find annoying sometimes I must say.

Last edited by Oz Train Driver; 01-26-2014 at 05:30 AM..
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Old 01-26-2014, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,788,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oz Train Driver View Post
You're just used to the American way of using the longest version of a word to describe something. You'll find many of our shortened words are shared with the 'poms'.

Also, I'm not aware an outback accent. Given that virtually nobody lives in the outback, I'd be highly surprised to find such a thing.

Being in Sydney would expose you to a lot of immigrants, people raised by immigrants or people who grew up with them. Those people will generally speak in a way that exaggerates the wrong words or sounds in a sentence. That is something which I find annoying sometimes I must say.
I guess he's thinking of Paul Hogan, Steve Irwin or the Bushtucker Man. They're just broad Australian accents, Hoge's was a rigger on the Sydney Harbour bridge. Aside from sounding a bit slower/drawled and stronger the country accent is pretty much the same as the urban.
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Old 01-26-2014, 08:01 AM
 
2,939 posts, read 4,123,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukaussi View Post
Indeed, the US decided it can't spell many words in the English language as they were too hard to remember (can't blame them somewhat) so they decided to either spell them differently or BOTH spell and pronounce them completely differently to the rest of the English speaking world, the most hilarious of which is ALUMINUM, an element on the periodic table!!
The British are the ones who decided to change the spelling of aluminum - twice. We stuck with the 2nd version becaus superfluous letters are, well, superfluous. If you're not going to pronounce it as "flav-ore" or "neigh-bow-er" then what's the point in spelling it like you would?

I cringe every time I hear the bolded part. It's like saying "down north" or "up south" If something is "similar to" then the converse is "different from".

To be fair - the western/southern US vowel merger is probably the most obnoxious thing to happen to the english language since the Great Vowel Shift. It can be difficult to communicate sometimes.

"Pool this."
'I'm sorry, do you want me to put all of these things together so we can share them later or do you want me to give it a tug?'

"That's my boss, hairy"
'He is indeed. What's his name?'

"I need a tin"
'You need something to put the cookies in or you need money?"
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:39 AM
 
9,326 posts, read 22,013,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiegold View Post
Did you just come here to tell us that you don't like the Aussie accent? And? Many people find the American accent nasally and whiny. Different people, different preferences.

Out of curiosity, how many different Australian accents have you heard? What do you consider to be a general Australian accent?
My thoughts exactly! And im a dual national.
I used to not think american english was nasally.. But after returning stateside you notice it..
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:32 AM
 
5,390 posts, read 9,687,621 times
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I like the Australian accent because it is informal.
Australians sound like they're approachable, pleasant, and would entertain a conversation with you.


Not all of them obviously, but that's the general generalization.
I notice they tend to end a sentence with this upward pitch as if asking a question, when in fact they're stating a fact.
Example. "I'm going to the store today." An australia would sound like "I'm going to the store today?" with an upward inflection as if asking a question.... but they're not.

I find that....... interesting.
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