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Old 04-15-2014, 09:34 PM
 
Location: East coast
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There are obviously well-known examples of Chinese-American cuisine like General Tso's Chicken, chop suey, fortune cookies etc.

Has Australia developed its own sort of distinct fast food or take-out style Chinese cuisine independently in this way from early Chinese immigrants to Australia?

Or is most Chinese food in Australia carried more directly and "authentically" from more recent Chinese immigration?
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Old 04-15-2014, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Traditionally yeah, Chinese food here seems to be similar to Americanised Chinese. Whether these similarities developed in parallel or were influenced by Chinese food in the US I don't know.

For instance, sweet and sour fish/pork, lemon chicken (chicken pieces in a thick batter covered in a lemon sauce, often with crispy white dry noodles), Mongolian beef/lamb, Hokkien noodles (in a black sauce), fried rice, and spring rolls (I think you call them egg rolls). We don't have 'General Tso's chicken' or even kung pao chicken much, nor chop suey, and fortune cookies aren't a big thing.

However, due to the massive influx of people (many students) from the PRC, you see tons of restaurants with more authentic fare from the Middle kingdom.
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Old 04-24-2014, 03:35 PM
 
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One of the things I really like about Australia is how ethnic "stuff" (for want of a better word) becomes part of the Australian mainstream. In terms of food, the chiko roll and the deep fried dim sim are Australianised versions of Hong Kong classics which are now staples in roadhouses, fish and chip shops and cafes around the country. It's just a pity that as foodstuffs they're revolting and bear very little resemblance to the original inspiration.
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Old 04-24-2014, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jehane View Post
One of the things I really like about Australia is how ethnic "stuff" (for want of a better word) becomes part of the Australian mainstream. In terms of food, the chiko roll and the deep fried dim sim are Australianised versions of Hong Kong classics which are now staples in roadhouses, fish and chip shops and cafes around the country. It's just a pity that as foodstuffs they're revolting and bear very little resemblance to the original inspiration.
Chiko rolls are kind of retro now...I haven't had one in yonks. Even in many fish and chipperies I don't seem em as much.
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Old 04-25-2014, 08:46 AM
 
991 posts, read 1,597,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
There are obviously well-known examples of Chinese-American cuisine like General Tso's Chicken, chop suey, fortune cookies etc.

Has Australia developed its own sort of distinct fast food or take-out style Chinese cuisine independently in this way from early Chinese immigrants to Australia?

Or is most Chinese food in Australia carried more directly and "authentically" from more recent Chinese immigration?
Yes, beef and blackbean sauce, mongolian lamb and lemon chicken are purely Chinese-Australian take-away staples, along with the bag of prawn chips. And for dessert try the deep fried ice-cream.
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Old 04-25-2014, 09:59 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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It's pretty much the same thing as American-Chinese in my experience... although Spring Rolls are more common than Egg Rolls (actually I don't think Egg Rolls exist in Australia, don't worry Aussies, you aren't missing out on anything! Spring Rolls are better!).

Sweet n Sour is served differently in Australia- it's served with the sauce already over the protein- and the protein isn't battered and fried like it is here. However, I have come across a few American-Chinese establishments that do it like they do in Australia.

Fried Ice Cream in Australian Chinese restaurants is very similar to the Fried Ice Cream you'd find at Mexican Restaurants in the U.S. but without all of the unnecessary garnish.

For the most part though, you won't find a whole lot of difference.
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Old 04-25-2014, 10:01 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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The Postman: Spring Rolls and Egg Rolls are different. Spring Rolls are WAY superior

My local Chinese Delivery thankfully offers both- so I always opt for the Veggie Spring Rolls. The main difference is in the type of wrapper used. Egg Rolls use a much denser wrapper, Spring Rolls are lighter and crispier and OH so much better!
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic View Post
It's pretty much the same thing as American-Chinese in my experience... although Spring Rolls are more common than Egg Rolls (actually I don't think Egg Rolls exist in Australia, don't worry Aussies, you aren't missing out on anything! Spring Rolls are better!).

Sweet n Sour is served differently in Australia- it's served with the sauce already over the protein- and the protein isn't battered and fried like it is here. However, I have come across a few American-Chinese establishments that do it like they do in Australia.

Fried Ice Cream in Australian Chinese restaurants is very similar to the Fried Ice Cream you'd find at Mexican Restaurants in the U.S. but without all of the unnecessary garnish.

For the most part though, you won't find a whole lot of difference.
Sweet'n'sour, whether fish or pork, is almost always battered in my experience. I don't frequent those westernised old type of Chinese places that much anymore but I've been to my fair share.

Ah yes, fried ice cream...
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:21 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Oh egg rolls are a different thing? Then I don't think I've had it before. What's the difference?
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Old 04-26-2014, 02:23 AM
 
Location: NSW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nugget View Post
Yes, beef and blackbean sauce, mongolian lamb and lemon chicken are purely Chinese-Australian take-away staples, along with the bag of prawn chips. And for dessert try the deep fried ice-cream.
The quality and flavour of these signature Australian-Chinese dishes also varies a lot, especially in country towns. When I go to Sydney -Hurstville area - it is much more reliable.
Honey chicken or prawns is also a mainstay usually deep fried like sweet n sour dishes, is usually much more consistent.
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