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Old 06-05-2009, 02:24 AM
 
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Quote:
South African to Kiwi is hard to tell for me,
interesting. I would've thought that the Australian/Kiwi accents were similar to British accents while the South African is similar to the German/Dutch area of Europe. Then again, my parents and relatives are all south african so I can easily tell the difference (for example, Australian's say "yeeh," while South african's say "Yar" for 'yes' - very different)
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Old 06-05-2009, 02:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Awesome story.

Maybe someday I'll go.
I find their culture incredibly intruiging,
but for me its climate ranges from "undesireable" to "frightening" most of the year.
(whereas climate-wise, Toronto has a little less of both )
You should definitely go if you get a chance. You just need to get your timing right. I was lucky enough to be there at the peak of the "undesireable" season so it was ok most of the time. But even then, a couple of times when the wind was coming straight in off the north atlantic the temperature dived and I could only imagine what it must be like the other 10 months of the year during the "frightening" season

I only had time to explore the eastern side of the island, but if I get a chance to go back I want to go to Gros Morne on the western side. I've only ever seen photos of the place, but it looks amazing.
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcNZ View Post
You should definitely go if you get a chance. You just need to get your timing right. I was lucky enough to be there at the peak of the "undesireable" season so it was ok most of the time. But even then, a couple of times when the wind was coming straight in off the north atlantic the temperature dived and I could only imagine what it must be like the other 10 months of the year during the "frightening" season

I only had time to explore the eastern side of the island, but if I get a chance to go back I want to go to Gros Morne on the western side. I've only ever seen photos of the place, but it looks amazing.
Maybe I will...

I know New Zealand is not a "warm place"
but is Newfoundland's climate still worse than the worst cold/rain/cloud climate that anywhere on the South Island?
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Old 06-05-2009, 04:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Maybe I will...

I know New Zealand is not a "warm place"
but is Newfoundland's climate still worse than the worst cold/rain/cloud climate that anywhere on the South Island?
I think it is worse in Newfoundland. Here is the average weather conditions of St John's, Canada and Dunedin, New Zealand.

BBC - Weather Centre - World Weather - Average Conditions - St Johns
BBC - Weather Centre - World Weather - Average Conditions - Dunedin

Dunedin is where I grew up in the south island, and although not the coldest part of NZ, it definitely has a reputation for pretty miserable weather. The summer temps look pretty similar between the two, but St John's gets quite a bit colder in the winter, and the winter lasts a lot longer too. Also, you can see that the record minimums in Dunedin are actually not that far off the averages. In St John's however, when things go bad, they REALLY go bad! For me personally, one of the most important differences is in the number of sunshine hours each day. St John's has 5 months of the year with only 2 or 3 hours of sunshine each day, Dunedin only has one month with an average as low as 3 hours a day.

There are probably more appropriate places in NZ to compare to Newfoundland, but I couldn't find a better one that had a head to head comparison with St John's on the same website. Besides, because I grew up in Dunedin I don't think anybody can accuse me of picking on the place. People can sometimes be a bit sensitive when it comes to the weather where they live .
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Old 06-05-2009, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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For actual winter lows, I don't expect anywhere in NZ to touch Newfoundland.

However, I was thinking more along the lines of the same number of days with a similar amount of wind, rain, fog and with highs under 13 C...
Not the dangerous cold days, just the "yuck."

I was talking to some guys from St. John's who said their airport has been closed to fog most days (or everyday) since late February when I met them at the Toronto airport... and this was early May.

*Looking at the winter sun stats, Dunedin still looks a little nicer than Toronto.
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Old 06-06-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcNZ View Post
I think it is worse in Newfoundland. Here is the average weather conditions of St John's, Canada and Dunedin, New Zealand.

BBC - Weather Centre - World Weather - Average Conditions - St Johns
BBC - Weather Centre - World Weather - Average Conditions - Dunedin

Dunedin is where I grew up in the south island, and although not the coldest part of NZ, it definitely has a reputation for pretty miserable weather. The summer temps look pretty similar between the two, but St John's gets quite a bit colder in the winter, and the winter lasts a lot longer too. Also, you can see that the record minimums in Dunedin are actually not that far off the averages. In St John's however, when things go bad, they REALLY go bad! For me personally, one of the most important differences is in the number of sunshine hours each day. St John's has 5 months of the year with only 2 or 3 hours of sunshine each day, Dunedin only has one month with an average as low as 3 hours a day.

There are probably more appropriate places in NZ to compare to Newfoundland, but I couldn't find a better one that had a head to head comparison with St John's on the same website. Besides, because I grew up in Dunedin I don't think anybody can accuse me of picking on the place. People can sometimes be a bit sensitive when it comes to the weather where they live .
Longterm average sun in Dunedin is about 1675 hours but it has increased in recent years with a record high of near 2000 back in 2003. St Johns is far colder than any NZ town, with an annual mean of only 4.7C (Canadian climate normals). I don't have its sun data but expect it would be lucky to be over 1500 hrs.
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Old 06-07-2009, 09:23 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Getting a bit off topic, lol.

Anyway...I can attest to Dunedin's cloudiness...Apart from the cloud the whole place felt really gloomy, yet I still really liked it. The people seemed strangely cheerful considering the weather.
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Old 06-07-2009, 10:28 PM
 
Location: New Zealand
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interesting. I would've thought that the Australian/Kiwi accents were similar to British accents while the South African is similar to the German/Dutch area of Europe. Then again, my parents and relatives are all south african so I can easily tell the difference (for example, Australian's say "yeeh," while South african's say "Yar" for 'yes' - very different)
There are actually 2 main South African accents, one is the very gritty and strong Dutch South African and then the finer British accent from the colonists who ventured there after the Boer War or there abouts. still easily picked as South Africans though by the use of certain words like Yar.
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Old 06-08-2009, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingkiwi View Post
There are actually 2 main South African accents, one is the very gritty and strong Dutch South African and then the finer British accent from the colonists who ventured there after the Boer War or there abouts. still easily picked as South Africans though by the use of certain words like Yar.
I believe I've heard both of them.

The one I'm most familiar with is a variant of an upper-class British accent.
This is the one I have trouble differenciating with Kiwi.

But I've also heard one guy with such a strong accent,
I wondered if English was his second language...
His name was "Hannes", pronounced "hahn-ness" and he told me he was South African.
It all made sense when I remembered the Dutch had a strong presence there.
It sounded like a weird, wild variation of a thick German-English accent

*Is "yar" actually with a pronouced "r" (rhotic),
(which might sound "piratey")
or is it like the non-rhotic "ar" sound?
(which could make it also sound like the German/Scandanavian "Ya/Ja" for "yes")
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Old 06-08-2009, 03:57 AM
 
184 posts, read 837,356 times
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Getting a bit off topic, lol.

Anyway...I can attest to Dunedin's cloudiness...Apart from the cloud the whole place felt really gloomy, yet I still really liked it. The people seemed strangely cheerful considering the weather.
There is a great quote made by Mark Twain when he visited Dunedin in the 19th century.

"The people are Scotch. They stopped here on their way from home to heaven - thinking they had arrived."

For me, that one quote pretty much encapsulates the psyche of those of us born and raised there.
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