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Old 12-29-2009, 09:32 PM
 
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A crackdown on drunkenness and violence will continue in Victoria with new laws brought in today, including extra powers for police to strip search people for weapons.

Police can also issue $234 on-the-spot fines for people who refuse to leave pubs and clubs when asked.

Victoria police get extra search powers
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Old 12-30-2009, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Texas
475 posts, read 1,558,325 times
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So, they can stop anyone on the street and strip seach without a warrent! or probable cause! my god, what kind of police state is that. Don't the citizens have a constitution/rights?
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Old 12-31-2009, 02:34 AM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
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But the problem is there are no police to enfore it as they all are too busy booking people for driving 3km/h over the speed limit
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Old 12-31-2009, 03:12 AM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,791 posts, read 8,147,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
But the problem is there are no police to enfore it as they all are too busy booking people for driving 3km/h over the speed limit


Unfortunately that's pretty close to the truth, if not the whole truth. Hardly any cops on the road here in Oz. Whenever pollies talk about toughening up some law, it's hard not to dismiss that as all blather and no substance. No point in having laws if you've got nobody to catch people breaking them.

Like the driving while talking on your mobile (cell) laws - I see people doing that all the time. I don't know anyone who's ever been caught at that and very few people who've ever been pulled over by a cop for anything. But I know lots of people who've been caught by a speed camera.

Besides, if they ever get before one of our judges, they'll get slapped with a wet noodle, at most.
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Old 12-31-2009, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Riachella, Victoria, Australia
359 posts, read 602,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dick1973 View Post
So, they can stop anyone on the street and strip seach without a warrent! or probable cause! my god, what kind of police state is that. Don't the citizens have a constitution/rights?
In the future the law may get abused.

At the moment, though, the police and state have a genuine focus on mindless drunken violence spilling out from the clubs.

Victoria does have a constitution. Bill of rights, not sure. There has been talk of one in recent years, not sure if we have it or not.

That's some sort of indication how much it matters to us.
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Old 12-31-2009, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Riachella, Victoria, Australia
359 posts, read 602,079 times
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Here you go dick 1973

VICTORIA LEADS THE WAY ON HUMAN RIGHTS

Victoria is set to become the first state in Australia (http://www.dpc.vic.gov.au/domino/Web_Notes/newmedia.nsf/b0222c68d27626e2ca256c8c001a3d2d/a4ec80ecaab0073eca2570dd007e7448!OpenDocument - broken link) to introduce a charter of human rights and responsibilities, the Attorney-General, Rob Hulls, announced today.

Mr Hulls said the State Government would enact a charter next year in line with the central recommendation of an independent panel appointed to examine the need for human rights laws.

Launching the panel’s report today, Mr Hulls said the Government would examine its recommendations and finalise the detail of legislation in the New Year.

“This is a commonsense move that will simplify our laws and bring together our human rights in one piece of legislation,” he said.

“These rights are currently either unprotected or scattered across the statute books haphazardly. Australia is the only western democracy with no clear human rights protection.

“A charter of human rights and responsibilities will strengthen and support Victoria’s democratic system.”

Mr Hulls thanked the independent panel – chaired by Professor George Williams with Olympian Andrew Gaze, AO Rhonda Galbally and former Victorian Attorney-General Haddon Storey – for seven months of widespread consultation.

“The panel travelled across Victoria, from Mildura to East Gippsland, listening to a wide range of individuals and groups,” he said.

“It received an unprecedented number of submissions showing overwhelming support for human rights to be better protected by law.

“The panel has recommended a way forward using the experience of countries with similar systems of government, such as the UK and NZ. It has not recommended a US-style bill of rights.

“But by enshrining our human rights in legislation, we can ensure future governments continue to value the rights of all Victorians.

“Some important rights, such as freedom of speech, the right to a fair trial and the right to vote, have no clear legal protection.

“A human rights charter will mean when the Government makes important decisions, these rights must be taken into account.

“If a charter is enacted, the rights contained in it will be given greater weight by the courts.”

Mr Hulls said Government departments would have to comply with the charter, and future legislation would be developed with regard to the rights set out in it.

“It’s also important to be clear a human rights charter will not stop the Government from taking strong action to protect the community against terror threats or criminal activity,” he said.

In releasing the independent panel’s report, Mr Hulls said the Government would welcome feedback and expected to finalise the legislation in the next few months.


Don't ask me if we actually have it or not, though.
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