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Old 05-24-2010, 01:16 AM
 
Location: South Philly
1,943 posts, read 6,980,991 times
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I love watching "This Old House" if for no other reason than to hear the sick New England accent those guys have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek40 View Post
The most offensive word that Aussies have invented is "You's"", used by both men and women, it shows a tackiness in the extreme.
Oh, it's definitely not unique to Australia. In Philadelphia and NYC it's quite common in blue collar circles even though there's quite a stigma attached to its use.

To the other folks who fret about young australians using americanisms or pronunciations - it goes both ways. 5 years ago, on the rare occasion that I would hear someone say "oh, no worries" I would ask when they lived in Australia. Now I hear it at least a couple of times per day. That and "cheers" in place of "thanks" is becoming quite common.

Also, i think americans who frown upon the use of "y'all" and "youse" do so because it's redundant. The plural form of "you" is "you".
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Old 05-24-2010, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,796,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solibs View Post
Also, i think americans who frown upon the use of "y'all" and "youse" do so because it's redundant. The plural form of "you" is "you".
I think it's dumb that English has no formally-accepted word to differeniate "plural-you" from "singular-you."
I also find it odd that we have no word to differeniate between "hot" from temperature and hot from peppers.

When I think of it logically,
it's silly that saying "you guys" to mean plural that can be male or female, even a group that's entirely female.
when words like "y'all" don't make any gender assumptions, yet it is less-commonly accepted.

French:
Singular "you" = tu
Plural "you" = vous
Hot-temperature = chaud
Hot-spiciness = piquant

I especially feel like an idiot, trying to quickly describe hot-pepper-spiciness and English doesn't make it easily distinguishable within 1-2 words.
Saying "pepper-hot" or "pepper-heat" makes me think I sound like I'm just learning English, since it is so bizarre-sounding.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:52 AM
 
Location: South Philly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
I think it's dumb that English has no formally-accepted word to differeniate "plural-you" from "singular-you."
actually, "You" has always been the plural version. "Thou" is the singular form that no one uses anymore. It's sort of the same in american spanish with ustedes replacing vosotros.

I've addressed a group of people before without saying "you guys" or "y'all"
it only becomes a problem if the people you're addressing are grammatically challenged. You can tell right away because people start looking around trying to figure out who you're talking to.


Quote:
I also find it odd that we have no word to differeniate between "hot" from temperature and hot from peppers.
Americans normally use the word "spicy" to solve that problem.
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Old 05-24-2010, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,796,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solibs View Post
actually, "You" has always been the plural version. "Thou" is the singular form that no one uses anymore. It's sort of the same in american spanish with ustedes replacing vosotros.

I've addressed a group of people before without saying "you guys" or "y'all"
it only becomes a problem if the people you're addressing are grammatically challenged. You can tell right away because people start looking around trying to figure out who you're talking to.
I never really thought about "thou" as being intended for singular-you, as a way to distinguish between plural-you.
Interesting.

Weirder still, "thou" sounds wrong even though it technically is right.

I also like you mentioning ustedes vs/ vosotros. I know a bit of spanish.

Quote:
Americans normally use the word "spicy" to solve that problem.
We use "spicy" for that too,
but I dislike how "spicy" can also mean heavy use of garlic... even nutmeg or cinnamon.
(obviously none of which will burn you )

Reminds me of the Hawaiian language and how they have no word for "weather."
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Old 05-25-2010, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Australia
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A true blue Aussie chiming in here, bred but not born. My family immigrated from the UK 21 years ago, so I can say without doubt that I have an Aussie accent. Mine is probably more of the inner city youth accent people have mentioned. My brother and I use "dude" and other American slang a lot, although many times we use it as an exaggerated display of being "hip". We also like to put on the broad accent if we are mocking bogans or pretending to be bogans when pissing about in the aisles of Coles.

I went back to the UK and lived there for a year and a half when I turned 18. It was surprising how many people asked me if I was Canadian. I picked up the Northern English accent quite quickly and came back to Oz with a distinctly jumbled accent.

I sometimes have a hard time telling if someone is British or Australian in TV shows and movies, but after a while, it becomes apparent. I have realised that when you are surrounded by a population with a different accent to yours, you sure as hell find yourself sounding amazingly occa.

As for traditional Christmas dinner - we blast the aircon and do a roast, complete with mash, gravy and Yorshire Puddings. In fact, last year we opened up an animated screensaver on the laptop of a roasting fire and sat it on the end of the dining table. I guess having spent a few Christmases as a teenager in the UK, coupled with an English mum and a Scottish Dad, we have always kind of eaten traditionally (including the ever present slices of buttered white bread with dinner every night).
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Old 05-25-2010, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
We use "spicy" for that too,
but I dislike how "spicy" can also mean heavy use of garlic... even nutmeg or cinnamon.
(obviously none of which will burn you
Just say spicy-hot for that sort of heat.
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Old 05-25-2010, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissThreadBare View Post
As for traditional Christmas dinner - we blast the aircon and do a roast, complete with mash, gravy and Yorshire Puddings. In fact, last year we opened up an animated screensaver on the laptop of a roasting fire
LOL! Love it! I might borrow your idea this Chrissie, that sounds like fun. Or maybe a screensaver of a window, looking outside at big falling snowflakes. A window with the small panes and the snow gathering in the corners
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Old 05-25-2010, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Newnan, Georgia
279 posts, read 673,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Or maybe a screensaver of a window, looking outside at big falling snowflakes.
Vichel, I'll give you the snowflakes if you give me the bbq and swimming pool....
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Old 05-26-2010, 12:35 AM
 
Location: South Philly
1,943 posts, read 6,980,991 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissThreadBare View Post
I went back to the UK and lived there for a year and a half when I turned 18. It was surprising how many people asked me if I was Canadian. I picked up the Northern English accent quite quickly and came back to Oz with a distinctly jumbled accent.
ahh mistakes with accents . . . I was in Barcelona trying to get up to Tibidabo when my companion and I quickly realized that the funicular was out of service for the season. We decided to take it on foot but as we were leaving we heard two people saying in english "well how do we get up there now?" so we invited them to join us. After talking to them for 5 minutes I asked if they were Scottish. They seemed offended and insisted that they were from Sheffield.

Waiting in line at a museum in Northern Ireland (Derry) we were chatting with the canadians in line in front of us. We started talking to them after hearing their canadian accents. The woman at the register asked them what part of the states they were from

Outside a pub in London (Tottenham?) with a bunch of friends from Philly/New Jersey some local guys started to chat up one of the girls we were with. After a few minutes I heard one of them ask her if she was Australian. They were all shocked to learn that she was from NJ perhaps they were familiar with this urban aussie accent you speak of.
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Old 05-26-2010, 03:01 AM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,782 posts, read 8,726,077 times
Reputation: 17780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minx View Post
Vichel, I'll give you the snowflakes if you give me the bbq and swimming pool....
We miss what we don't have, don't we? I liked the hot Christmas for the first 2 or 3 years, but then wished it was a cold Christmas after that. When we're back in Canada again, I'll probably be whinging about it being cold and wishing for the pool and bbq! And taking the dog down to the dog beach and seeing all the dogs with jingle bells on their collars, reindeer horns on their heads, and other silly but cute Christmas decking on them.
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