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Old 04-22-2010, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Saudi Arabia
1,823 posts, read 1,884,480 times
Reputation: 792

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Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
GOOD GOD NO!!!!!! Indians can't speak english to begin with... anyone who's ever called up a phone company or have gotten a telemarketer call will know what I mean. They are already stealing Australian jobs etc, the last thing we need is the population speaking telemarketernese.


Girls generally don't call each other 'mate'.
Can u speak a word of our language m8 .. though we've got more than 25 different regional languages .. we're all bilingual some are multi-linguists.. even in our day to day conversations ..an illiterate tea vendor on the street or a beggar speaks english clear enough to understand ..nevermind the accent .. well thats just a simple example .. students from our country flock into prominent and prestigious universities in the west ..get the best education they possibly can .. a pettyTukTuk driver is capable to provide his offsprings a medical, engineering and other such degrees .. long story short .. Never say we can't speak ENGLISH

There was a Maharaja who went to the makers of Rolls Royce in England to order one for himself .. he was ridiculed by the salesman who said '' Get out of here, u can't afford it '' ..the Maharaja bought 10 RR's out of contempt and each of them were used as a Garbage truck lol ..its not a fable ..its a fact even Ripley was paid not to reveal i believe so ! lolz
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Old 04-22-2010, 01:25 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,186,229 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by §AB View Post
GOOD GOD NO!!!!!! Indians can't speak english to begin with... anyone who's ever called up a phone company or have gotten a telemarketer call will know what I mean. They are already stealing Australian jobs etc, the last thing we need is the population speaking telemarketernese.


Girls generally don't call each other 'mate'.
Lol, that would be pretty awful. I'm sick of all the tech support people being Indian.

Yes, women in general have never used 'mate' so much, some do, but I've heard them call each other 'dude' alot. I'm surprised you don't find dude annoying to me it's like nails on chalkboard. 'Douchebag', though, is even worse. Thanks South Park!
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Old 04-22-2010, 04:37 AM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,782 posts, read 8,740,303 times
Reputation: 17780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes, women in general have never used 'mate' so much, some do, but I've heard them call each other 'dude' alot. I'm surprised you don't find dude annoying to me it's like nails on chalkboard. 'Douchebag', though, is even worse. Thanks South Park!
Maybe it's just the novelty of those terms for Australian youth? They're certainly not new. I remember the word douchebag from high school in Canada, when it was pretty much a nasty insult directed at women only. And dude's obvious. Surfer talk. But more Hawaiian, California surfer talk than Aussie surfer. Probably from the 60's. And before that, a cowboy term, if I'm not mistaken.

It's just the power of popular media. People wouldn't use those terms if they didn't like them. I'm not bothered by American/foreign terms infiltrating Australian lingo. I view it as inevitable, given the way the entire globe is so connected these days. Terms & sayings come and they go.
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Old 04-22-2010, 05:40 AM
 
Location: SWUS
5,419 posts, read 9,215,138 times
Reputation: 5853
I find the Australian accent quite interesting. As an American speaking with a fairly nonexistent accent (from moving so much, lived in WI till I was five, then Las Vegas, then California, then New Mexico) I've heard a fair amount of different American accents.. I find myself wishing there was more variety.

Now, from what I understand, non-American English has a far wider array of accents and pronunciations than American English does, and that's why I find most British and Australian accents pretty cool.

I like it quite a lot from females, I used to have a female friend from Sydney that I talked to via the Internet (mic chat) and it was pretty interesting.
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Old 04-22-2010, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,853,664 times
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I still find the "posh" accents more interesting than North American English accents, just because it's different.
Words like "no" becoming "nay-ah-oo-ih" to my Canadian ears.
My general preference for Australian accents is the less an accent resembles North American English, the better!

SAB said he never heard an Australian/American hybrid...
Trimac showed me a link to a site where they are taking samples of accents from different areas.
One young man from NSW sounded "dead-ringer" North American for at least 25% of every word he spoke;
pitch, tone, vocal position as well as accent.

Check out this link:

YouTube - Blokeman Meets Metrosexual Man

"Metrosexual Man" has a hideous "Australian-meets-CNN-anchorman" hyrbid accent, imho.
I'm guessing the police are speaking General Australian? Is that General Australian?
I like Blokeman's accent best, but the police also sound nice.

Last edited by ColdCanadian; 04-22-2010 at 08:37 AM..
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Old 04-22-2010, 12:38 PM
 
7,732 posts, read 12,655,218 times
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I like it both equally with the British accent! I think it's really funny.
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Old 04-22-2010, 12:55 PM
 
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I generally like Aussie accents. Australians, whether rightly or wrongly, are stereotyped as good natured people with a zest for life and their accent is automatically associated with good vibes.
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Old 04-22-2010, 01:50 PM
 
Location: South South Jersey
1,652 posts, read 3,887,244 times
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As a part-time armchair linguist (hee), I'm really fascinated by the Aussie/Kiwi (possibly some obscure British dialect[s], too, but not any that I've experienced) pronunciation of the phoneme [u] (in other words, "ooh," or the vowel sound in 'to,' 'too,' and 'two'). It almost sounds to me like an initially 'pure'/rounded [u]/"ooh" that sort of turns into a non-rhotic (i.e., non-'R'-pronouncing) "err" at the end. What's really fascinating (for me) is to hear someone draw this vowel out, as in, "The award goes tooooo.... [whomever]." I haven't been able to totally wrap my mind around how exactly this vowel is produced, but obviously there's some really simple articulatory position(s) involved (for native speakers). For the longest time, I had some trouble doing an authentic 'raised' Canadian [əʊ̯] (as in the quintessentially [Eastern] Canadian pronunciation of "about"), but I finally had an 'a ha!' moment and can now do it perfectly.

Oh, and
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
The word 'no' sounds like 'noi'...
This! This! This! The phenomenon I described above has some articulatory association with the one Vichel is describing, even though there are different vowel sounds involved ([u]/"ooh" and [o]/"oh"). (At least I think so - we could be thinking of different phenomena, but I can see how the sound I perceive as a non-rhotic "err" could be considered an "oy.") It's been years since I took a phonology course, so bear with me, but it's almost like some unusually strong (for these phonemes) airstream closure going on vis-à-vis jaw and/or tongue position. Really fascinating that 'extreme' (possibly?) versions of these vowel sounds are associated (at least the [o]/"oh" one) with some sort of "Aussie valley girl" speech style. Maybe some semi-consciously "lazy speech" thing going on? No idea, but this is all very, very interesting to me.

Last edited by Alicia Bradley; 04-22-2010 at 02:20 PM..
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Old 04-22-2010, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,853,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alicia Bradley View Post
As a part-time armchair linguist (hee), I'm really fascinated by the Aussie/Kiwi (possibly some obscure British dialect[s], too, but not any that I've experienced) pronunciation of the phoneme [u] (in other words, "ooh," or the vowel sound in 'to,' 'too,' and 'two'). It almost sounds to me like an initially 'pure'/rounded [u]/"ooh" that sort of turns into a non-rhotic (i.e., non-'R'-pronouncing) "err" at the end. What's really fascinating (for me) is to hear someone draw this vowel out, as in, "The award goes tooooo.... [whomever]." I haven't been able to totally wrap my mind around how exactly this vowel is produced, but obviously there's some really simple articulatory position(s) involved (for native speakers). For the longest time, I had some trouble doing an authentic 'raised' Canadian [əʊ̯] (as in the quintessentially [Eastern] Canadian pronunciation of "about"), but I finally had an 'a ha!' moment and can now do it perfectly.
This is how I learned it:
"ab-ah-oot" and you slur the "ah" and "oo" to do it properly.
Is that like the way you learned it?

Quote:
Oh, and

This! This! This! The phenomenon I described above has some articulatory association with the one Vichel is describing, even though there are different vowel sounds involved ([u]/"ooh" and [o]/"oh"). (At least I think so - we could be thinking of different phenomena, but I can see how the sound I perceive as a non-rhotic "err" could be considered an "oy.") It's been years since I took a phonology course, so bear with me, but it's almost like some unusually strong (for these phonemes) airstream closure going on vis-à-vis jaw and/or tongue position. Really fascinating that 'extreme' (possibly?) versions of these vowel sounds are associated (at least the [o]/"oh" one) with some sort of "Aussie valley girl" speech style. Maybe some semi-consciously "lazy speech" thing going on? No idea, but this is all very, very interesting to me.
This might be a good example of this "posh" or "Aussie Valley Girl" accent:


YouTube - Outback Queensland Adventure

She definitely has a lot of vowel sounds going into each of her long O's.
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Old 04-22-2010, 08:14 PM
 
Location: South South Jersey
1,652 posts, read 3,887,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
This is how I learned it:
"ab-ah-oot" and you slur the "ah" and "oo" to do it properly.
Is that like the way you learned it?
More or less... sort of like "ab-eh-oot" for me, but we may be thinking of the same thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
This might be a good example of this "posh" or "Aussie Valley Girl" accent:


YouTube - Outback Queensland Adventure

She definitely has a lot of vowel sounds going into each of her long O's.
Oh wow - that's great (and exactly the sort of thing I was thinking of). I honestly think (nouveau?/posh/valley girl) Aussie "oh" and "ooh" sounds are some of the coolest/weirdest sounds in any English dialect (with which I'm familiar, that is).
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