Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Australia and New Zealand
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-22-2010, 08:39 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 6,958,408 times
Reputation: 3861

Advertisements

To me, the voice in the Queensland video, just sounds like general Australian with a small amount of RP mixed in.


"Ask the Master to pass the Banana"

YouTube - Australian accent - How to
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-22-2010, 08:48 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,102,565 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kangaroofarmer View Post
To me, the voice in the Queensland video, just sounds like general Australian with a small amount of RP mixed in.


"Ask the Master to pass the Banana"

YouTube - Australian accent - How to
Notice how the young girl in this video uses a more 'back' realisation of the broad 'a' vowel compared to the rest (all older folks)? I.e. more posh sounding. This is a development that is occuring among the speech of the young.

The Queensland video isn't TOO weird, but some of the pronunciations do sound a bit strange.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,824,971 times
Reputation: 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Notice how the young girl in this video uses a more 'back' realisation of the broad 'a' vowel compared to the rest (all older folks)? I.e. more posh sounding. This is a development that is occuring among the speech of the young.
I heard it. She sounds like she's saying
"... Osk the moster to poss the banonna..."

The older gent before her sounds familiar to me through BBC programming,
but her pronunciation is a little less "natural" sounding to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,824,971 times
Reputation: 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alicia Bradley View Post
More or less... sort of like "ab-eh-oot" for me, but we may be thinking of the same thing.
Maybe that is closer, or at least the most common way of saying it.

Quote:
Oh wow - that's great (and exactly the sort of thing I was thinking of). I honestly think (nouveau?/posh/valley girl) Aussie "oh" and "ooh" sounds are some of the coolest/weirdest sounds in any English dialect (with which I'm familiar, that is).
Glad you liked the link.
I think I also detect it in the song "Nobody Likes a Bogan" on youtube which sounds to me like "No-ybody Likes a Bo-ygan"

I don't "hate" the posh accent; sometimes I quite enjoy it...
but there's no denying it is the hardest accent for me to understand, (not counting mumbling )
which is ironic as the name of the accent implies it's supposed to be sophisticated/elite.
I have never had any difficulty understanding any famous people on TV or in film with a broad accent however.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,782 posts, read 8,732,477 times
Reputation: 17780
The first lady on that video sounds very different. I don't know anybody who talks like that. What part of the country would she be from??

It's interesting that there's loads of videos on Youtube just on the Australian accent. I found this one that sounds more like what I hear from teenaged girls, complete with the squeaky voice ...


YouTube - My Australian Accent!!

The way she says 'video' is what I'm talking about with taking the 'owe' sound and making it sound more like 'oi', or 'awe-ye'. It's just slight in this particular Youtube example. Also at about the 24 second mark, where she says "you know".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,589 posts, read 27,824,971 times
Reputation: 3647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
The first lady on that video sounds very different. I don't know anybody who talks like that. What part of the country would she be from??
Around 0:13-0:14, her "mouth" sounds more like "muth."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 10:53 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,102,565 times
Reputation: 11862
^ Haha I messaged that girl on youtube.

Not only that but listen to the way she says 'g'day mate' the first time, the way an American would say it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2010, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
10,782 posts, read 8,732,477 times
Reputation: 17780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
^ Haha I messaged that girl on youtube.

Not only that but listen to the way she says 'g'day mate' the first time, the way an American would say it.
Probably from watching American media? That Americanisation that people bemoan. Terms, slang and even the accent.

This one with Joe Avati is good for examples of the wog accent. His accent is not too woggy but he does a skit on his wog uncle. Italians in Canada sound different to Italians in Oz. There's a definite Aussie-ness to the way Italians speak here ....


YouTube - Joe Avati - The Wog/Aussie Uncle
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 12:18 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,102,565 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vichel View Post
Probably from watching American media? That Americanisation that people bemoan. Terms, slang and even the accent.

This one with Joe Avati is good for examples of the wog accent. His accent is not too woggy but he does a skit on his wog uncle. Italians in Canada sound different to Italians in Oz. There's a definite Aussie-ness to the way Italians speak here ....


YouTube - Joe Avati - The Wog/Aussie Uncle
No, Italians speak the same regardless of where they were born or grew up .

In some ways 'wogs' do retain the broader characteristics of the Aussie accent. Then there's the slightly different Lebanese accent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
5,054 posts, read 6,903,490 times
Reputation: 2862
Quote:
Originally Posted by vichel View Post
the first lady on that video sounds very different. I don't know anybody who talks like that. What part of the country would she be from??

It's interesting that there's loads of videos on youtube just on the australian accent. I found this one that sounds more like what i hear from teenaged girls, complete with the squeaky voice ...


youtube - my australian accent!!

the way she says 'video' is what i'm talking about with taking the 'owe' sound and making it sound more like 'oi', or 'awe-ye'. It's just slight in this particular youtube example. Also at about the 24 second mark, where she says "you know".
SHe's a babe
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Australia and New Zealand
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top