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Old 05-21-2011, 11:36 PM
 
148 posts, read 356,011 times
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Hey all,

I am testing out a Hyundai Tiburon SE 2006 manual transmission and I was wondering if I could ask a few of you all on here about driving a manual. I am able to get to point A to point B but I am a bit sluggish when I'm beginning to move from a stop. I have only stalled twice so far, once getting ready to turn left at an intersection and once at a traffic light. The traffic light incident occurred because I was trying to lay off the gas a bit while releasing the clutch to see if I could move it without revving it really high.

So basically:

1.) How much pressure should I apply to the gas when releasing the clutch from a stop? It just sounds like I'm revving the engine up really high before I release it enough to get moving.

2.) How fast should my foot be releasing the clutch when I start to get the gears rolling?
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Old 05-22-2011, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Ohio
780 posts, read 2,753,852 times
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These two questions do not have solid answers; they depend on traffic conditions, the car, and the surface (weather-related) conditions.

All I can say is practice makes perfect. You have found two of the stall points, there are many more. You have also found the points where you can get the car moving, there are many more. Just keep practicing, in a few weeks you will get the hang of it.
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Old 05-22-2011, 01:08 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 10,638,559 times
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Ditto to what PV said above.

Though the principles are the same, every vehicle is different. The clutch in my daily driver (Chevy S10, replaced at 198k miles) has a different bite than my weekend car (Volvo 745Ti, original at 245k miles), so I do have to adjust my coordination timing a bit between them.

Give yourself a couple weeks to get used to it, and a few months to really get used to it.
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Old 05-22-2011, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,237 posts, read 23,912,027 times
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X3 on what's been said.

Every clutch is different. It takes time to find the feel of things.

Once you find out where the clutch grabs, you won't even think about it, you will know when it's supposed to and at the same time you'll also learn how much fuel you need to give it to keep it from stalling.

For me in my daily driver pick up truck, I usually barely press on the accelerator while letting slowly off the clutch.

Oh and also if you're ever wondering about if you're sitting up a hill at a stop light and you wonder about "rolling back"....once you get the hang of the clutch, you'll most likely not have any issues.
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Old 05-22-2011, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,360 posts, read 11,869,891 times
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It's hard to analyze when you do it automatically. It seems to me that the easing up on the clutch and pushing down on the gas are somewhat even in opposite directions with the gas initiating the action. Once you're rolling your foot should be off the clutch unless you want to disengage. Both movements should be gradual not sudden. (I'm practicing under the table)

You'll be a pro in no time.
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Old 05-22-2011, 07:58 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 17,505,482 times
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Congrats! I've primarily driven stick shifts for almost 40 years, like everyone says each vehicle is a bit different. Also it's hard to explain when you do it without thinking...I just ran a quick errand and paid attention; I apply steady light pressure to the gas while quickly and smoothly depressing and letting out the clutch pedal.

You've no doubt been told that the worst thing for a clutch (unless newer ones are different) is resting your foot on the pedal....the less time your foot is touching the clutch pedal, the better.

I think it's natural for people to be afraid of stalling out at first, so they give the vehicle too much gas while keeping the clutch pedal pressed down for too long. Which is bad for the clutch, wastes gas and results in jerky shifting. Keep a light foot and aim for smoooooth shifting.

Anyway....you'll get it with practice!
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Old 05-22-2011, 09:05 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,773 posts, read 17,483,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upsilon View Post
Hey all,

I am testing out a Hyundai Tiburon SE 2006 manual transmission and I was wondering if I could ask a few of you all on here about driving a manual. I am able to get to point A to point B but I am a bit sluggish when I'm beginning to move from a stop. I have only stalled twice so far, once getting ready to turn left at an intersection and once at a traffic light. The traffic light incident occurred because I was trying to lay off the gas a bit while releasing the clutch to see if I could move it without revving it really high.

So basically:

1.) How much pressure should I apply to the gas when releasing the clutch from a stop? It just sounds like I'm revving the engine up really high before I release it enough to get moving.

2.) How fast should my foot be releasing the clutch when I start to get the gears rolling?
Go to an empty parking lot and practice your take off and backing up.

It's not rocket science and with a little practice you will be just as good as any of the other posters here.
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Old 05-22-2011, 11:52 AM
 
148 posts, read 356,011 times
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Thanks all! I'm definitely going to go out and practice in a parking lot today. Getting it moving from a stop is really the only hard part about driving this thing and it's pretty fun to be able to feel the car and have a bit more control over it.

I definitely have a lot more respect for people who drive manual's now. Cheers all! I will report my success of my trial runs later on.
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Old 05-22-2011, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Poway, CA
2,698 posts, read 11,611,872 times
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While in the parking lot practicing, start by working on getting the car moving sans-gas. This will help you learn the clutch engagement point for the car as well as how quickly you can dump it out. Everything from there is just about speeding up the process. More gas means you don't have to go so slow on the clutch.

As for hill starts (the scariest part of learning stick), the biggest helpful piece of advice I ever got was to think of it in two parts. Part One: stop the car from rolling backwards. This is a balance act of letting the clutch out to the point where it won't roll back and enough gas to keep the RPMs above stall once you get the clutch to that point. Part Two: from there, go forward. Once you've reached that balance point, it should be no big deal.

Mike
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Old 05-22-2011, 12:48 PM
 
8,402 posts, read 23,199,228 times
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100% agree with all that's been said. The goal is to give as little gas as possible to get the car rolling. Revving up farther than necessary doesn't accomplish much more than burning up the clutch. Practice makes perfect, just be sure you're practicing correctly. Bad habits die hard. For instance, there's no real point in downshifting when coming to a stop. There are variations on this, but for the most part having a manual transmission doesn't really give you a reason to downshift while stopping in normal driving.

Good luck, have fun, be careful.
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