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Old 09-15-2011, 08:42 AM
 
1,320 posts, read 3,701,633 times
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Getting ready to replace original tires(Goodyear) on my 2005 Neon. About 45K on them. Would it make much difference if I put more expensive tires on it? Would it ride much better, or quieter? I plan to drive the car another 30k then sell it.
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Old 09-15-2011, 09:39 AM
 
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Better tires can perform better in a variety of ways. More expensive doesn't necessarily mean better, but cheap is cheap. Try tirerack.com, discounttire.com, and Neon forums to read reviews on tires, then choose what is best for your situation and budget. Keep in mind that many people aren't qualified to review a glass of water, let alone tires, so some reviews aren't very helpful. Gotta sort through the junk.

IMHO tires are the most important $$$ to be spent on a car, and this isn't a time to go cheap. I've had great success with Michelin on numerous vehicles, but there are several good brands. It also comes down to the specific model of tire.
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Old 09-15-2011, 10:27 AM
 
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VMAXNC- Thanks for the help. I have no trouble buying really good tires for the car, if it would make a difference. It might be unfair if I called the Goodyear tires that came with the car-junk. 45k on them and 25% life left is not bad at all. I just wonder if I bought a higher end tire would the car handle a bit better or ride quieter?
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Old 09-15-2011, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Purgatory (A.K.A. Dallas, Texas)
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Yes, high quality tires will be much quieter and increase the handling. But you'll have to decide what's more important, handling or ride quality. Typically, the two are mutually exclusive. Plus, good-handling tires won't last near as long due to softer rubber compounds.
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Old 09-15-2011, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Poway, CA
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Better is a relative term to what you're trying to acheive. Mileage? Noise (or lack thereof)? Traction? Comfort? Rolling resistance (mpg)?

Personally, on any non-towing vehicle, I prefer to have as performance-oriented of a tire as is reasonable. Doesn't mean I throw slicks on the family sedan, but if I have to sacrifice a few thousand miles out of a set of tires to get a bit more traction, so be it. And given that tires are one of those things you only buy every couple of years, I have no issues paying a wee bit more if the tire seems worth it.

My favorite daily-driver tire right now is the Continental ExtremeContact. I have it both on my Scion xB and on my wife's Accord. A bit noisy, but the handing is great, the wear is pretty good, and the wet traction is exceptional (you know, for all those heavy thunderstorms SoCal is so notorious for). They rate well on tirerack.com, a source I trust pretty well (though you have to take customers' reviews with a grain of salt).

Mike
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteboyslo View Post
My favorite daily-driver tire right now is the Continental ExtremeContact. I have it both on my Scion xB and on my wife's Accord. A bit noisy, but the handing is great, the wear is pretty good, and the wet traction is exceptional (you know, for all those heavy thunderstorms SoCal is so notorious for). They rate well on tirerack.com, a source I trust pretty well (though you have to take customers' reviews with a grain of salt).

Mike
I'll put in another vote for Continental, I'm running the extreme contact myself and the grip levels are very good, the wet capabilities (which I've managed to asses a whopping one time so far, yay drought..?) seemed very good, which was a big reason why I bought this (great wet traction and braking) coupled with good wear scores, they are also significantly quieter than the all seasons that came on the car originally.
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:17 PM
 
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Well, the car is a Neon, and it actually handles fine. I am not trying to turn it into anything it isn't. I think what I would most like is a softer, quieter ride. And if I can get 35-40k out of them, all the better. Cost isn't really an issue, but don't want to pay lots more if I am not getting what I want. I am guessing all the big tire makers produce tires for this car?
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:46 PM
 
4,500 posts, read 12,341,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdcdguy View Post
Well, the car is a Neon, and it actually handles fine. I am not trying to turn it into anything it isn't. I think what I would most like is a softer, quieter ride. And if I can get 35-40k out of them, all the better. Cost isn't really an issue, but don't want to pay lots more if I am not getting what I want. I am guessing all the big tire makers produce tires for this car?
Well the car isn't the issues, tires are relatively rarely made for specific brands, other than high end cars like the Porsche 911 etc that occasionally have tires custom made for that model.

What you need to look at is tire size, which is what it goes by, if your car has stock wheels, you can just put in the year, make and model of your car on sites such as tirerack.com and it will automatically find all tires that are of a compatible size, you'll likely have plenty to choose from.

At that point you can decide to look exclusively at tires in certain categories, for instance only winter tires (I know this is not applicable here, but an example), there should be a guide indicating what the specific category traits are, to help you make an informed decision.

If you'd like a softer and quieter ride, you should avoid high performance tires, they generally have stiff sidewalls (compromising ride quality) and their aggressive thread patterns can sometimes lead to excessive noise.

Tirerack is a great resource as they do testing and evaluating as well as have user feedback on almost every tire in their catalog, especially the popular ones, I'd urge you to go and explore you're options, find some you think you'll be happy with and seek advice here on the specific models, if needed.

I'd also mention that many local tireshops (Discount Tire etc) will price match tires from tirerack as well, I saved $100 by doing this but avoided the hassle of going several places to get everything (aka having tires delivered from one place and mounted another).

Lastly, I'd always urge you to put much more performance on braking distance and wet condition and evasive maneuver capabilities than things like price and longevity, you might not be needing it, or you might need it just once, but you'll be very glad you focused on it the one time it saves your life.

I hope that helps.
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Old 09-15-2011, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
17,213 posts, read 57,058,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdcdguy View Post
Well, the car is a Neon, and it actually handles fine. I am not trying to turn it into anything it isn't. I think what I would most like is a softer, quieter ride. And if I can get 35-40k out of them, all the better. Cost isn't really an issue, but don't want to pay lots more if I am not getting what I want. I am guessing all the big tire makers produce tires for this car?
By all means go to Tire Rack's web site, where they have comparison charts with ratings of dry traction, turn-in, noise comfort, ride comfort etc.

Pity that you value comfort over performance, one does not value comfort over performance because one is old, but vice versa - one is old because one values comfort over performance. But, whatever, Tire Rack's charts will let you zero in on whatever parameter you decide to value.

If you only want to drive the car 30K more miles (what specific problem do you expect to appear on-cue then?) I would not get carried away on the tires, so long as they have say half life left in them, if you don't ask too much for the car, I don't see not having new tires on a car that otherwise is far from new being an issue.
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Old 09-15-2011, 03:39 PM
 
8,402 posts, read 24,222,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
By all means go to Tire Rack's web site, where they have comparison charts with ratings of dry traction, turn-in, noise comfort, ride comfort etc.

Pity that you value comfort over performance, one does not value comfort over performance because one is old, but vice versa - one is old because one values comfort over performance. But, whatever, Tire Rack's charts will let you zero in on whatever parameter you decide to value.

If you only want to drive the car 30K more miles (what specific problem do you expect to appear on-cue then?) I would not get carried away on the tires, so long as they have say half life left in them, if you don't ask too much for the car, I don't see not having new tires on a car that otherwise is far from new being an issue.
Not everyone needs or has any use for higher performance. I do, generally. But many people don't view their vehicles as recreation, just transportation.

My opinion is that even if the OP only wants 30K out of his tires until he sells the car, that's 2-3 years. I wouldn't want to be on bargain tires for 2-3 years. Unless I know for an absolute fact I'm selling a vehicle in the next few months, I want the best rubber I can get, reasonably speaking. It may not add much to a resale value, but it certainly won't hurt.
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