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Old 12-09-2012, 09:34 PM
 
12,108 posts, read 14,067,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
Small amounts of paint coming off the vehicle and other dirt/debris. I assume that you noticed it after washing/waxing the vehicle??? To avoid/eliminate this condition you need to use a good rubbing compound to get as much of that stuff off the paint as possible.
Wrong on both accounts..........
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:37 PM
 
12,108 posts, read 14,067,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldengrain View Post
I read an article about washing the car once. It said that whatever material you use to wash the car with will eventually get some grit in it and you will end up with these fine scratches that you do yourself (it said you were almost guaranteed to get those scratches from carwashes).

It said you should start out by using a powerful spray of water all over the car. You want the water to swish away most of the debris - the more debris you can get off without touching the car with a rag/sponge, the better the job will turn out.

Then you use a lot of suds. Apply the suds on gently, not rubbing much. If the suds sit/soak in an area for a bit they will lift and soften some debris - next you scrub where necessary.

Use a powerful spray to rinse. Touch up cleaning where needed. Dry with a clean dry towel. Use as many clean dry towels as necessary.

Make sure all sponges, rags, etc, are thoroughly washed and rinsed after each use. Don't just wring out.

It's a war with fine particles of grit.

The only time I noticed those swirl marks on my car was after I had been to a car wash, frankly.


Also use a 2 bucket system. One bucket/sponges for the wheels/ lower body....... The other bucket/sponges for the rest of the car
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,530 posts, read 9,803,501 times
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Are there automotive shops that specialize in detailing cars and can remove these swirl marks? And if so, what's the average price go for it?
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:30 AM
 
8 posts, read 5,129 times
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Sorry to bring this back from death... but there is a lot relevant information in regards to the concerns posed about swirl marks, what they are and what causes them in a piece I wrote (I am not a bot ).

I was doing a google search and this thread popped up. Hopefully it will help educate a lot of you.

Here is an excerpt to give some context and either earn the click/read(takes maybe 8+ minutes to read through) or save you the waste of time.

"What causes swirl marks on car paint? Really, what causes the most common forms of damage on car paint may be an even better question! Why? Even though swirl marks may be the most known example of car paint damage, it is not the only one to be concerned with.

Modern paint finishes on automobiles are made up of 3 parts of paint that when put over the substrate of the body makes up what we know as “car paint”. Modern paint finishes start with a primer that ensures a proper bond of the paint to the substrate. A layer called the base coat is put on top of the primer and it is the part that actually has the color/pigment that makes your car a certain color. Finally, a layer called the clear coat is put on top of the base coat. The clear coat is the thickest layer and is clear. It’s primary role is to protect the base coat. These are the 3 common layers of paint on modern paint finishes and there’s a very good chance this is how your car’s paint is made up.

Before we get too deep into the topic let’s learn a bit more about the intensity of paint damage in modern paint finishes.

Superficial damage to your paint would be damage that is only in the clear coat. It is superficial because it does not penetrate lower and your paint still has, for the most part, the protection it needs. Major damage would be damage that has penetrated below the clear coat (see paint cutaway image below). Superficial damage can be repaired to a great degree, if not to perfection. Major damage may not necessarily be repaired without bodywork or repainting of some manner.

The purpose of this piece is to educate you as to what causes the most common forms of damage to modern automotive paints, how they can be repaired and what...."


http://clearbraatlanta.com/modesta-c...s-in-car-paint

A lot of my industry peers share this content with their own clients to help educate them about what's going on with their paint. I hope you all enjoy this.
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
28,402 posts, read 67,494,126 times
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I have had swirl marks on only one car. It was a car that I particularly loved (1995 Camaro Z28 - Patriot Red (which is burgundy)) . Someone talked me into getting it detailed even though it still looked great after 7 years. It was a fancy detail place. Expensive but they claimed they knew how to do things right. It came back looking like crap. Swirl marks all over and every tiny rock chip or hairline scratch that you could not see before was now glaringly visible. After a time it looked better, but it never looked as good again and always the swirl marks were visible in bright sun. Later another detailer convinced me the first guy just did it wrong. He could fix it and make the car look like new (aside from the detailing disaster it already looked like new). It came back looking like crap again. I told him it looked like crap. He said he would re-do it. That made it worse. After another 4- 5 years it began to look nice again. Not quite as shiny, but it looked like new - perfect. The swirl marks and chips, tiny scratches were still there, but not visible except on super close examination in bright sun.

Now I stay the heck away form detailers and rotary buffers of any kind and I have not seen swirl marks in any of my cars since. I also discovered some car manuals specifically say to never use any form of rotary polisher or buffer ont he paint. I really should start reading those manuals when I first get a car.
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:54 AM
 
8 posts, read 5,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
I have had swirl marks on only one car. It was a car that I particularly loved (1995 Camaro Z28 - Patriot Red (which is burgundy)) . Someone talked me into getting it detailed even though it still looked great after 7 years. It was a fancy detail place. Expensive but they claimed they knew how to do things right. It came back looking like crap. Swirl marks all over and every tiny rock chip or hairline scratch that you could not see before was now glaringly visible. After a time it looked better, but it never looked as good again and always the swirl marks were visible in bright sun. Later another detailer convinced me the first guy just did it wrong. He could fix it and make the car look like new (aside from the detailing disaster it already looked like new). It came back looking like crap again. I told him it looked like crap. He said he would re-do it. That made it worse. After another 4- 5 years it began to look nice again. Not quite as shiny, but it looked like new - perfect. The swirl marks and chips, tiny scratches were still there, but not visible except on super close examination in bright sun.

Now I stay the heck away form detailers and rotary buffers of any kind and I have not seen swirl marks in any of my cars since. I also discovered some car manuals specifically say to never use any form of rotary polisher or buffer ont he paint. I really should start reading those manuals when I first get a car.
May I ask what years those services were performed and about how much you spent on each one?
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
28,402 posts, read 67,494,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muswaj View Post
May I ask what years those services were performed and about how much you spent on each one?
It would have been in about 2000 or 2001 ish. The first guy was $180.00 (when the going rate was $75 and most of them came to you. The second guy was maybe two years later, and he charged $300. Again at his shop. The first guy was a fancy detailer but small. He mostly put swirl marks into high end cars. The second guy was at a sizable detailing company that advertised on TV or radio, again focusing primarily on higher end cars. A Z28 was not a high end car, but it was my baby. I kept it for 18 years despite having plenty of money for something fancier during much of that time. That was my favorite car. I wanted to kick both of those guys in the seat of their pants every day for the rest of their lives.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:09 AM
 
8 posts, read 5,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
It would have been in about 2000 or 2001 ish. The first guy was $180.00 (when the going rate was $75 and most of them came to you. The second guy was maybe two years later, and he charged $300. Again at his shop. The first guy was a fancy detailer but small. He mostly put swirl marks into high end cars. The second guy was at a sizable detailing company that advertised on TV or radio, again focusing primarily on higher end cars. A Z28 was not a high end car, but it was my baby. I kept it for 18 years despite having plenty of money for something fancier during much of that time. That was my favorite car. I wanted to kick both of those guys in the seat of their pants every day for the rest of their lives.
It's a real shame they've got you feeling there are not qualified detailers that could please you.

I don't blame you for being skeptical now but there are definitely pro's that do some awesome work in Michigan nowadays. The article I posted touches on what you experienced. I wish you the best moving forward with your car care.
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Old 09-22-2017, 08:22 AM
 
405 posts, read 472,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
It would have been in about 2000 or 2001 ish. The first guy was $180.00 (when the going rate was $75 and most of them came to you. The second guy was maybe two years later, and he charged $300. Again at his shop. The first guy was a fancy detailer but small. He mostly put swirl marks into high end cars. The second guy was at a sizable detailing company that advertised on TV or radio, again focusing primarily on higher end cars. A Z28 was not a high end car, but it was my baby. I kept it for 18 years despite having plenty of money for something fancier during much of that time. That was my favorite car. I wanted to kick both of those guys in the seat of their pants every day for the rest of their lives.
Do you know if they clayed the car first before buffing?
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Old 09-22-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
28,402 posts, read 67,494,126 times
Reputation: 34266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muswaj View Post
It's a real shame they've got you feeling there are not qualified detailers that could please you.

I don't blame you for being skeptical now but there are definitely pro's that do some awesome work in Michigan nowadays. The article I posted touches on what you experienced. I wish you the best moving forward with your car care.
This was in California.

I do not know whether they use clay bar or not. They had the car for several days, but it was probably just sitting around until they could get to it.

Detailing used to be quite the rage. There were all kinds of services that would come to the parking garage at work and detail your car while you were working. They were always sticking cards or flyers under your wiper blades, in your mailbox, and advertising in the paper and on radio like mad (maybe TV too). I do not see that anymore.
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