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Old 02-10-2013, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Everett, MA
24 posts, read 96,334 times
Reputation: 16

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I have a 1993 Toyota Corolla and I never changed a tire on a car before. I had a flat tire and had to call AAA. It looked very simple. I want to change my own tire next time. The jack I have looks old. I have the jack, the tool to wind up the jack and the wrench to to take the bolts. I want to buy a new jack and wrench because they look really old. Can anyone recomend something simple and affordable that I can keep in my car?

I was thinking about buying this wrench because it looks way easier to use than what I have
Ken-Tool 35663 18'' 4-Way Lug Wrench : Amazon.com : Automotive

Last edited by Genome; 02-10-2013 at 10:44 PM..
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:48 PM
 
2,341 posts, read 10,729,053 times
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It's not about the tools looking old. Are they in good condition? Do they operate as they should? If yes, you're fine - especially in light of the fact that the Corolla is a light car.

If you really want to replace it, consider getting one from a Corolla at a salvage yard. Or you could go to your local WalMart, TSC, or some such store and buy a small floor jack. I've seen a lot of small ones like this on sale for less than $30.

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Old 02-10-2013, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Here.
16,166 posts, read 14,812,908 times
Reputation: 19061
Hmmm...isn't there already a jack in the car (with the spare tire)?
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:06 PM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
1,030 posts, read 3,860,741 times
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BEWARE of the jacks that come with most cars. They are stamped metal and pretty low quality. They also have a small base so they have almost no support when it comes to wind or hills.

They are called scissor jacks or something, in the VW world people refer to them as "widow makers" for obvious reasons.

If your going to use the jack that comes with the car make sure you jam the E-brake, put it in park or a gear, and loosen the lug nuts before you lift the tire off the ground.. also NEVER put any part of your body within the wheel well, if the car starts moving its going to fall off the jack.

If you buy a normal hydraulic jack its recommended that you also buy a jackstand, incase the jack fails. this should apply for the other jack too... Just be ready to get out of the way at all times..


When you tighten the lugs theres a sequence of tightening, a corolla i think is 4 lug so you start with one, and then make a cross pattern, never go in a circular sequence, always across.

and when using the jack that comes with the car, there are jacking points under the car in certain places... make sure you check your owner manual to find out where they are... if you start jacking in the wrong place, the jack could punch right through the floor pans and either seriously hurt you or ruin your car. Your car is on the older side so pay close attention.
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:37 PM
 
3,184 posts, read 6,528,994 times
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You must have a jack and know how to use it. Many jacks that come with a car are not as easy to use as the rolling floor jack as pictured. Dont assume you can use any jack. Its best to pretend you have a flat and go through all of the motions as a dry run, DO IT DONT CHEAT......you will feel safer when you drive from learning to do it right. You cant always call AAA especially if your cell phone is dead..
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Old 02-11-2013, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Central Jersey - Florida
3,377 posts, read 13,647,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crestliner View Post
You must have a jack and know how to use it. Many jacks that come with a car are not as easy to use as the rolling floor jack as pictured. Dont assume you can use any jack. Its best to pretend you have a flat and go through all of the motions as a dry run, DO IT DONT CHEAT......you will feel safer when you drive from learning to do it right. You cant always call AAA especially if your cell phone is dead..
Good advice, I had my 3 kids (2 girls, 1 boy) do the same numerous times when they started to drive. I am confident that the 2 girls can safely change a flat and never had a doubt with my son. I will add this as a thought. It don't seem that the OP has a lot of mechanical background. All of us here that have used a hydraulic jack in the past know that one needs to make sure the release valve is tight before jacking the car up. I have seen cheaper jacks leak down if you dont put some muscle into making sure that valve is really tight. I have also seen some of my "SMARTER" buddies leave their car up on a jack over night without jack stands for support only to find their car on the floor the next day, but that's a different story, different day
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Old 02-11-2013, 05:58 AM
 
774 posts, read 2,351,838 times
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Your best option is a floor jack. The stock jacks that come with cars are junk.

Spend $100 and get yourself a name brand jack and a jack stand. Will make life a whole lot easier.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:00 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,773 posts, read 16,672,304 times
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I have Hydraulic floor jacks that I use in my garage but they are too large and heavy to be carrying in my car. I did find a small version of a garage jack that is lighweight, compact and fits nicely in the trunk of my car. It cost around $90 at Harbor freight. It is Chinese made but you can't find any American made jacks for this price that will sit in your trunk for years with little use.It is much smaller than it appears in the photo.Those little bottle jacks that others have mentioned are definitely widow makers.

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Old 02-11-2013, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,070 posts, read 2,679,482 times
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I use a low profile hydraulic floor jack (looks similar to the one pictured above, just with a narrower front end) bought at Harbor Freight. Don't remember how much. I also keep two small jack stands in my car. As for tools, I've got a 4-way lug wrench, like the one the OP linked to -- only on mine, two sides fold down, making it easier to store.

I also have one of these (about $20 at Home Depot):



As well as a set of larger, deep well sockets (all metric). Between the $20 tool kit, the socket kit (which fit on the wrench in the tool kit), the jack stands, and the jack, I can do 99% of work on my car, on the side of the road.

I keep the tool kit, socket kit, a pair of work gloves, a magnetic bowl (can be stuck to the car, and holds bolts / screws), and a Haynes work manual (one of the most important tools there is, if you want to start working on your own car) behind the drivers seat, and the hydraulic jack and jack stands in the trunk. This is all in a '92 Miata. It barely takes up any room, and gives me peace of mind. I also have AAA membership, in case something goes really bad.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:13 AM
 
13,522 posts, read 16,173,125 times
Reputation: 20777
Quote:
Originally Posted by exhdo1 View Post
Good advice, I had my 3 kids (2 girls, 1 boy) do the same numerous times when they started to drive. I am confident that the 2 girls can safely change a flat and never had a doubt with my son. I will add this as a thought. It don't seem that the OP has a lot of mechanical background. All of us here that have used a hydraulic jack in the past know that one needs to make sure the release valve is tight before jacking the car up. I have seen cheaper jacks leak down if you dont put some muscle into making sure that valve is really tight. I have also seen some of my "SMARTER" buddies leave their car up on a jack over night without jack stands for support only to find their car on the floor the next day, but that's a different story, different day
Or better yet, jack the car up and not know where the release is or how to release it!
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