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Old 02-10-2014, 04:59 PM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
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If I buy a vehicle with a 3-on-the-tree (which I think would be super cool since it's the only stick shift I've never driven), would it be a problem taking it to the shop? After all, how many people, including mechanics, know how to drive a 3-on-the-tree? I wouldn't want them to wreck my transmission because they're trying to figure out how to drive it. Do you think this will be a problem or am I creating my own trouble?
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:00 PM
 
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Where in the heck are you going to find one ?
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
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My first vehicle in the US was a Ford pick-up truck with "three on the tree" and an oil bath instead of an air cleaner. Circa 1964. I was teaching my little brother to drive it and the shifter fell off the tree, LOL. I had it switched to the floor - don't recall that being a big, or expensive, deal.

Not sure why you would want one now, but they were very simple to drive so I don't think it would be a big impediment.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:19 PM
 
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Great memories! My dad had a garage and I worked for him in college. I used to run cars back and forth to him all the time. Once he tells me to go out and get the Maverick. I could see it was a standard with the clutch, but I couldn't for the life of me figure out how to shift it! Had to go back in and ask.

But ya, if it were me, I'd want to drive it in any strange shop myself.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:20 PM
 
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other than nostalgia for what must be an old car ...

what's the attraction?

it's a simple mechanical linkage, nothing complicated about a "3 on the tree" shift pattern.

I don't forsee a problem with mechanics wrecking your transmission over driving this car ... especially since there aren't too many shops that will want to work on such a vintage car.

Last one I drove was a '57 Chevy Station Wagon with O/D and the 6-cylinder engine ... which was a very common vehicle in it's day and there's still a lot of them in collector's hands now.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:22 PM
 
Location: WI
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wow talk about memories flooding back (and not all are fond ones lol). I learned how to drive back in 78 on a '66 Chevelle w/ 327 & "3 on the tree" and drove a few old pickups w/ same shifters. Thought they were easy enough to drive, except of course when i wanted to beat on said Chevelle and finding 2nd gear isnt always easy to grab quickly.


OP if you find one, post pix so us old timers can take a look. And for your one question, frankly i've seen some techs grind gears on new rides so not sure how they'd handle going old school.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:34 PM
 
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I had a '75 Chevy half ton P/U with 3 on the tree...convenient as you can have a bench seat with one. I loved driving it...I learned on a '70 AMC Hornet with 3 on the tree. Any mechanic worth his (or her) salt shouldn't have any issues with that tranny as it is far more simple than anything on the market today.

Modern cars are great as they last far longer with less maintenance than older models...older (vintage) vehicles are easier to work on though.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:51 PM
 
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Ah, memories flow back..

I'm sure you'll find a mechanic familiar with that trans. I once drove a '72 Ford Econoline with the 3- on-the-tree and I thought it was fun to drive.
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Old 02-10-2014, 05:54 PM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nodpete View Post
Where in the heck are you going to find one ?
They made 'em through 1987. Chevy trucks were the last vehicles to have them, in the 1987 model year. I read that the F-series trucks were second to last, with 1986 being the final model year for them. I'd love to find a 1987 Chevy truck with a 3-on-the-tree, just to say I have the last model... but this vehicle is older. I'm not telling you where it is because I want it for myself... :-P

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
Not sure why you would want one now, but they were very simple to drive so I don't think it would be a big impediment.
Theft prevention - who can steal a vehicle he can't drive?
Novelty - who else has one?
Bench seat with a stick shift. 'Nuff said. (I know that some floor-mounted sticks came with bench seats... my '82 Dodge Ram was like that... but for my wife's build, perhaps a column-mounted stick is better.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by WouldLoveTo View Post
But ya, if it were me, I'd want to drive it in any strange shop myself.
I just might. First thing I'll certainly do is ask if any of the mechanics at whatever shop know how to drive one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger17 View Post
OP if you find one, post pix so us old timers can take a look. And for your one question, frankly i've seen some techs grind gears on new rides so not sure how they'd handle going old school.
And so I shall. Truthfully, I'm not nuts about newer rides. My brother had a 2001 Corvette with a 6-speed stick and it had this stupid "skip shift" function whereby it would be mechanically locked out of shifting into 2nd and 3rd... so you'd go straight from 1 to 4 if you're not under hard throttle. Frankly, there's no point to having a stick shift if you cannot control what gear you select. Leave it to a modern computer to tell you what you can and can't do. I'll pass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by born01930 View Post
Modern cars are great as they last far longer with less maintenance than older models...older (vintage) vehicles are easier to work on though.
Let's talk about just how great they are, shall we?

Oxygen sensor replacement on 1996 Tahoe: $151 (and if you have to get all four of 'em done, just hit that "times 4" on your calculator to assess the damage!)
Oxygen sensor on vintage vehicle: $0 (no oxygen sensors!)

Alternator on 1996 Silverado: >$200 (couldn't replace it myself)
Alternator on 1996 Ford van: >$200 (couldn't replace it myself)

Alternator on 1982 Dodge Ram: ~$36 (and I was able to replace it myself)

Transmission replacement job on 1996 Tahoe (automatic) last week: $2,560
Transmission replacement job on 1982 Dodge Ram (manual) in 2005: $1,000 (even adjusted for inflation, it's barely half of the Tahoe's cost)

And I can't imagine what the replacement cost will be on one of those new 8-speed or 9-speed automatic transmissions. When one of those goes blooey, empty the bank account and max out the credit card.

My brother's 2008 HHR SS started having engine trouble. At 56,000 miles. He doesn't drive it rough. Engine replacement cost: $8,000 as estimated by dealership. My guess is that an older engine wouldn't cost even half that much to replace.

Essentially, I'm sick of newer vehicles. Give me a good old-fashioned straight six where I can see the road through both sides of the engine compartment, where the exhaust stinks if you're behind it, and where you don't need jacks nor fancy tools to change the oil.
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Old 02-10-2014, 06:00 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 17,343,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RomaniGypsy View Post
T
Theft prevention - who can steal a vehicle he can't drive?
Novelty - who else has one?
Bench seat with a stick shift. 'Nuff said. (I know that some floor-mounted sticks came with bench seats... my '82 Dodge Ram was like that... but for my wife's build, perhaps a column-mounted stick is better.)


I wish I could find the link but I can't...a couple of years ago a woman with a stick-shift Mustang was car-jacked locally. The morons responsible could not drive a stick and abandoned her car a few blocks away.

I'm with you, I like old stick shifts and bench seats and manual window & door locks and I am a small female...but we are a dying breed!
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