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Old 05-11-2018, 05:57 PM
 
23,424 posts, read 17,499,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwong7 View Post
You and me both. I hate keyless ignition systems. After all the Toyota/Lexus unintended acceleration cases, the idea that your mechanical kill-switch has been replaced by a radio-button and relay is crazy to me. I prefer cars where I have more control. I was a "manny tranny only" owner for the first 20 years of driving. I finally bought a non-manual EV, but the car still has a mechanical "ignition" and key.

I will admit that the 2 advantages with keyless ignition is that you can get in and get going a bit faster and the key can stay in your pocket or purse. The downside is the expense of replacing the key, needing to change the battery (or the consequences can be dire...), security issues, and not being able to physically kill the running motor with a flick of the switch in an emergency situation.
A dead keyfob isn’t a dire situation in most cases as they typcially have a key built in and the keyfob battery doesn’t need to work to start the car
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,728 posts, read 19,491,317 times
Reputation: 14755
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willamette City View Post
Whats the standard battery life of a key fob? We have a 2017 Outback. Love the keyless entry!
Mine was getting weak at about 3 years, maybe a bit less. I stopped off at the dealership where I bought it. They replaced it at no charge and showed me how to do it. Cheap battery, very easy to replace -- if you know how!

I prefer the keyless system. It's very simple to use, but my current car is the first one I've had with that. My wife's 1997 had to have the ignition switch changed around 10 years ago at a cost of around $200 iirc, and it's not been working quite right again for the past couple years.

Because I live in a small city in Wyoming, keep my car garaged when not using it and drive a Prius, I generally leave the fob in the car. Not many vehicles are stolen around here, and NOBODY would steal a Prius!
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
5,291 posts, read 1,817,277 times
Reputation: 5160
Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoNewk View Post
Mine was getting weak at about 3 years, maybe a bit less. I stopped off at the dealership where I bought it. They replaced it at no charge and showed me how to do it. Cheap battery, very easy to replace -- if you know how!

I prefer the keyless system. It's very simple to use, but my current car is the first one I've had with that. My wife's 1997 had to have the ignition switch changed around 10 years ago, and it's not working quite right now.

Because I live in a small city in Wyoming, keep it garaged when not using it and drive a Prius, I generally leave the fob in the car. Not many vehicles are stolen around here, and NOBODY would steal a Prius!
Also a perk with a regular ignition if you have a garage. My key never leaves the ignition, and I only have one key as I need no house key or any other keys aside from the one car key when I go out.
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:30 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,264 posts, read 1,175,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziggy100 View Post
Why would anyone want an old fashioned key? Might as well ask if people prefer hand cranks over electric starters.
People will come up with a variety of excuses, but it all boils down to the fact that keyless is different than they're used to. A lot of people have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the future.
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:34 PM
 
866 posts, read 384,559 times
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This is a great start no pun intended. I really like the fact that technology is moving forward in so many directions. Folks have all sorts of choices to suit their tastes. Just the fact that you can learn from the experiences of others in todays world via cell phone or computer is great stuff. I have to admit old style key switches been infrequently problematic over fifty years of driving. I can't remember ever being stranded by a key or switch. "But Almost". I am seeing my future car being key-less, and this is my way of preparing for that new car experience.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:10 PM
 
41,817 posts, read 46,657,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somebodyfromnc View Post
The only negative I can think of is the instances of people using range extenders to extend the range of your key fob and get into or steal your vehicle without having to break the glass....

There is no reason this should be possible and I'm saying that as someone that has a pretty good understanding of encryption.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
6,469 posts, read 2,369,621 times
Reputation: 10724
Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoNewk View Post
Mine was getting weak at about 3 years, maybe a bit less. I stopped off at the dealership where I bought it. They replaced it at no charge and showed me how to do it. Cheap battery, very easy to replace -- if you know how!

I prefer the keyless system. It's very simple to use, but my current car is the first one I've had with that. My wife's 1997 had to have the ignition switch changed around 10 years ago at a cost of around $200 iirc, and it's not been working quite right again for the past couple years.

Because I live in a small city in Wyoming, keep my car garaged when not using it and drive a Prius, I generally leave the fob in the car. Not many vehicles are stolen around here, and NOBODY would steal a Prius!
Thanks for the info, very good to know!

We have a couple years to go....
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:26 PM
 
41,817 posts, read 46,657,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_is_here View Post
If you could promise me that electronic keys would never, ever, let me down, I'd vastly prefer it.

It's not standard on all of them but there is a mechanical key that slides out of the FOB. Be sure to know where the key slots are because they are usually hidden or whatever other method there is for starting the car. One problem here especially if you are in an area that uses salt on the roads is lack of use may make the door unopenable. If might be a good idea to lube and exercise the keyhole on the door occasionally.

A relatives bought a used vehicle with a FOB and he couldn;t start the car because of a dead battery in it. If I remember correctly it had the emergency key and there was a key slot on the door for it but no slot inside to use it to start the car, he later found out is was an "option". Forget exactly what he did but I think he heated the battery a little which gave him enough juice to start it. He carries a spare battery in the console for any future problems.

Last edited by thecoalman; 05-11-2018 at 07:54 PM..
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:44 PM
 
41,817 posts, read 46,657,417 times
Reputation: 17776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
People will come up with a variety of excuses, but it all boils down to the fact that keyless is different than they're used to. A lot of people have to be dragged kicking and screaming into the future.

I'm all for new tech but sometimes I often have to ask myself is this really necessary? If you have a regular keyed vehicle you can walk into just about any hardware store and have a copy made for few bucks.

On the other hand replacing a FOB can be hundreds for something that realistically should should be no more than about $20... they can charge outrageous prices because you can't walk into any hardware store and have one made. Any advantage for security for example is mitigated by the emergency key. It's a convenience that many people like but a very expensive one if you lose the FOB.


The next issue with these new cars is going be all these electronics/devices becoming broken or even obsolete. I bought a used car that had an early version of Onstar and the unit was obsolete so all the buttons on the rear view were worthless. Add to that after researching I found out it was pretty important to disconnect it. If for any reason it would try and communicate since there would be no response it would continue trying to send a signal draining the battery. Stuff like this going to be a very big problem in a few years.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:14 PM
 
866 posts, read 384,559 times
Reputation: 717
Default Hidden key slots and backup mechanical keys being an option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
It's not standard on all of them but there is a mechanical key that slides out of the FOB. Be sure to know where the key slots are because they are usually hidden or whatever other method there is for starting the car. One probelm here especially if you are in area they use salt on the roads is lack of use may make the door unopenable. If you have one might be a good idea to lube and exercise it occasionally.

A relatives bought a used vehicle with a FOB and he couldn;t start the car because of a dead battery in it. If I remember correctly it had the emergency and there was a key slot on the door for it but no slot to use it to start the car, he later found out is was an "option". Forget exactly what he did but I think he heated the battery a little which gave him enough juice to start it. He carries a spare battery in the console for any future problems.


Hidden key slots and backup mechanical keys being an option.This conversation got intense the minute you spoke of a dead battery in the FOB in combination with this backup failure stuff. I am glad to be learning this stuff now because of past frequent medical emergencies in our house. Our car had to be dependable no matter what no surprises, turn the key and go. I just know that scenario is way out of the ordinary.
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