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Old 03-31-2021, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,225 posts, read 10,707,431 times
Reputation: 19177

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasRoadkill View Post
But the other culprit is all the "car restoration shows" on TV. Now everyone thinks that either one day they will restore the rust bucket in their backyard or they think they are worth a king's ransom.
I think a lot of the "Classic Muscle" market is inflated now with Boomers at retirement age and with some cash they're willing to throw at reliving their youth.

I know plenty of gear heads in my (millennial) generation that have their own restoration/modification hobbies they enjoy. That said, their interests are a lot more diverse WRT the cars they fancy. One high school friend has a Jeep TJ wrangler he's done up, another has a Fox Body mustang, one has a Miata that he's heavily restored.
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Old 03-31-2021, 03:09 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
40,535 posts, read 72,384,115 times
Reputation: 49887
Just this past weekend I watched the Barrett-Jackson auction in Arizona. There were cars going for $40k that obviously sold for half of what it cost to restore/build them. Others, with the numbers matching and rarity documentation, even such as a '70 Chevelle SS went for well over $100k. It's really just what someone is willing to pay for it. A decent driver '69-72 Nova with 4 doors goes for $10-12k, while a 2 door with V8 is $25k and up, no one wants a 6 cylinder or a 4 door.

I did notice that 80% of the winning buyers appeared to be boomers or Gen X, but then a neighbor kid went to WyoTech and at age 33 has his own restoration business (but out of his parents' home).
When I go to the local swap meets there are many younger millennial attendees, but yes, the majority are still us boomers or even "greatest generation" people.
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Old 03-31-2021, 03:16 PM
46H
 
1,540 posts, read 1,153,252 times
Reputation: 3328
Here is another reason for the lack of interest - we used to modify cars to increase performance. We would save up for a performance manifold/carb, headers, exhaust, cams on occasion, and hopefully a jump in HP.

Today, I can find (for example, there are others) tons of unmolested 2017 Ford Mustang GTs running 435HP (stock) with excellent handling/brakes and all the safety equipment we have come to take for granted - for prices starting around $25k! For cheaper money, the 2017 Mustang with the 4-cyl ecoboost is running 310HP. These cars are cheap to maintain, they rarely break during the first 100k miles, and there are tons of them. You can throw in the Camaro and Challenger/Charger in the cheap but exciting HP mix, too.

I love the 2nd gen Camaro Z28, but the prices start at 30k and quickly go up. For a mostly stock/restored one (350 running 275HP) the prices are even higher. Then you get in for a test ride and they still rattle, the brakes are meh, the seats suck, most of the time there is no AC, they are not that fast and they ride like crap. If you want something more than a Sunday morning coffee club car, these classics are out. The restomod versions of these cars can cost 2-4 times what you would pay for that 2017 Mustang GT.

Why start in with restoration when, for pretty cheap money, you can have a recent pony car and enjoy it from day one? Yes, these cars are common, but the driving experience is such a bargain.
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Old 03-31-2021, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Floribama
18,559 posts, read 40,092,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert20170 View Post
Late early 2000 models? In the Fall I bought my wife this 1985 Berlinetta Camaro for $5,600. Two owner, 56,000 miles.



The Fall before that, I bought this '97 Jeep Wrangler Sahara for $1,200 and worked on it in my garage for 6 months to get it to what you see here:



Granted, they aren't '69 Camaros or like the '69 Firebird I restored in the early 2000s:



But, there are still bargains out there, and working with computers on a car is no big deal. You just need to become educated in whatever you buy. I joined a third-gen fbody forum when I was looking for my wife's Camaro and learned all I could.
Man I haven't posted there in quite a while.

Here's a thread where I posted pics of my GTA a decade ago (I'm the one with the Max Headroom avatar)

https://www.thirdgen.org/forums/hist...-trans-am.html
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Old 03-31-2021, 08:03 PM
 
6,503 posts, read 2,824,289 times
Reputation: 7891
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasRoadkill View Post
Has the hobby of car restoration become a rich man only game?

When I started restoring classic cars in the early 90s, a working stiff could afford to buy a decent "driver" that was restorable without having to get the pros involved. In the last ten years, even rust buckets are out of the reach of the average hobbyist except for late early 2000 models, which require a computer degree to work on.

It seems young men and women will never the joy of taking an old classic and bringing back to life with their own hands.
Classic cars are nice but being an 80's baby, don't have any sentimental value to me. So I will be "restoring" a 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee and 1999 Dodge Durango.
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Old 03-31-2021, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
7,659 posts, read 5,215,760 times
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I had hot rod cars all my life, none were really show quality but they were drivers and some were really fast. Most I bought what someone started and I finished it.
There are lots of cars in backyards that the owner intends to fix and they have been there for years.
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Old 04-01-2021, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
8,058 posts, read 9,978,774 times
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A fine restoration indeed .https://www.city-data.com/forum/memb...uy-434734.html
The restoration cost was well over the twenty thousand that I got for it when I sold it.
Had it for four years, then decided it was time for a Corvette.
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Old 04-01-2021, 09:52 AM
 
Location: NYC
20,553 posts, read 15,622,534 times
Reputation: 25616
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBtwinz View Post
Long winded:

This topic is very personal for me as I am about to turn 61 and while in my younger years I enjoyed working or should I say wrenching on vehicles. The enjoyment is disappearing. It did not matter if I poured my blood, sweat, tears and money into it, I enjoyed it. I loved everything about it. It was pure back then, fuel, spark and ignition were the only range of trouble shooting skills you needed to get a car to run or fix.

Engine comparts were big and wiring harnesses were small, we did not need a stinking computer to run the car. The only frustration to me were setting points when the distributor was in the back against the firewall.

Fast forward to today, I currently own two 20 year old BMW's, one an M3 the other a Z3 Coupe. Last year three days before a very significant car show we enter each year my radiator went on my M3. I naively got an estimate from the local independent BMW shop. I thought what the heck I would splurge and pay $400 to get it fixed on time. The estimate for the radiator and two hoses was $1050. Needless to say the day before the show I found myself installing the radiator and hoses myself. It took me eight hours and my total cost was $250. Luckily I have the patience and knowledge to do this but it wasn't like the old days where everything was accessible and parts were not fragile. I don't enjoy the inaccessible hard to get to parts on the vehicles or the time or the amount of delicacy you have to work with for what used to be a simple repair.

While I still love cars, I am losing the passion of working on them. Maybe it is my age. Nothing is simple anymore on the newer cars and everything is so expensive.

As far as the younger kids getting in to cars, they are out there but god bless them and their ability to work alongside the computers, sensors and electronics in these newer cars. I don't feel the love for that type of repair.

Each year we go to a World Of Wheels motorcycle show and I see hundreds of collectable motorcycles and very few younger people coming to the shows and I wonder who is going to be getting all these vintage motorcycles or affording them. Same with those older vehicles at Cars and Coffee, when we Baby Boomers pass them on, who can afford them? Someone mentioned Bring a Trailer, there was a time years ago where you did bring a trailer to pick up the car or parts you bought. You didn't need a second mortgage to make your purchase. Now it is for the very affluent.

My three cents
It's not gonna be the same in 20 years because the millennials are not affluent enough to have the disposable income and wealth. Many are struggling to find affordable homes for their 1st purchase and still paying student loans. This is the result of decades of terrible government inaction and bad legislations that leads to kicking the can down and destroying the future of our generation.

Millennials are not gonna have pensions to live off and enjoy their senior years spending on cars or boats. Many will likely have to work well into their 70s.
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Old 04-01-2021, 11:25 AM
 
13,395 posts, read 12,263,064 times
Reputation: 35692
Quote:
Originally Posted by naterator View Post
I blame C4C. That boondoggle took a LOT of "restoration candidate" cars off the road and turned them into beer cans.
C4C only effected 500k cars. It was a blip on the market. It has had no long effects on the market. The same amount of cars or more have been lost to natural disasters since 2009.
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Old 04-01-2021, 11:45 AM
 
5,076 posts, read 4,265,133 times
Reputation: 16419
Quote:
Originally Posted by 46H View Post
Here is another reason for the lack of interest - we used to modify cars to increase performance. We would save up for a performance manifold/carb, headers, exhaust, cams on occasion, and hopefully a jump in HP.

Today, I can find (for example, there are others) tons of unmolested 2017 Ford Mustang GTs running 435HP (stock) with excellent handling/brakes and all the safety equipment we have come to take for granted - for prices starting around $25k! For cheaper money, the 2017 Mustang with the 4-cyl ecoboost is running 310HP. These cars are cheap to maintain, they rarely break during the first 100k miles, and there are tons of them. You can throw in the Camaro and Challenger/Charger in the cheap but exciting HP mix, too.

I love the 2nd gen Camaro Z28, but the prices start at 30k and quickly go up. For a mostly stock/restored one (350 running 275HP) the prices are even higher. Then you get in for a test ride and they still rattle, the brakes are meh, the seats suck, most of the time there is no AC, they are not that fast and they ride like crap. If you want something more than a Sunday morning coffee club car, these classics are out. The restomod versions of these cars can cost 2-4 times what you would pay for that 2017 Mustang GT.

Why start in with restoration when, for pretty cheap money, you can have a recent pony car and enjoy it from day one? Yes, these cars are common, but the driving experience is such a bargain.
John DeLorean was one of the pioneers in factory prepped hot rods, beginning with the Pontiac GTO and on to his eponymous gull wing DMC car. He thoroughly understood the idea of money replacing the nut and bolt knowledge needed to have a fast good looking car, all those guys who couldn't turn a wrench were now able to show up at the Triple X drive in and pose to their hearts content.

On a side note, I was surprised at my grandsons overall lack of interest in cars, the oldest at twenty five liked the feel of speed and found his love of cars at an early age, but the other three boys seemed to be oblivious to any thing having to do with cars, they said they were-- just transportation..
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