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Old 06-09-2009, 05:56 PM
 
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I have a 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer Sportback (wagon). It's black. I've never had any accidents -- knock on wood! -- and in general the car still looks fine.

But I've noticed that I have A LOT of chips in my paint. Mostly they're on the hood and on the doors -- from rocks, from people opening their car door into mine, etc.

In a few of these places, the black paint is chipped away and you can see silver/gray metal underneath.

Is there anything I can do about these spots? Or maybe I should say, anything that can be done about these spots....probably by someone else.

Repainting the entire car seems like overkill, but I guess my concern about painting just these little spots is that the new paint won't match the existing paint (which I'm sure has oxidized through the years), or that the newly painted spots will be obvious.

What are my options?
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Old 06-09-2009, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Eastwood sells a good kit to fix paint chips, you will need brush-on touch up paint as well.

Depending on how handy you are, you may want to check around and find a good detailer who can do this.
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Old 06-09-2009, 06:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
Depending on how handy you are, you may want to check around and find a good detailer who can do this.
I'm not very handy when it comes to this sort of thing, and I'm extremely wary of spending money on paint and other supplies and taking a stab at the first spot...and then discovering that the finished product is horribly noticeable, etc. I don't want to waste the money or the time.

It's my intention to have the car detailed inside and out in a few months. I didn't know that detailers would do this service. Is that standard? (I mean, obviously it would cost me extra. I just mean, is this kind of spot-repair something that a lot of detailers are accustomed to doing.)
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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I'm not certain, I am a DIY type of guy, so I do it, but check around, probably not *every* detailer does paint chip repair but I am pretty certain some do.

Possible some body shops that do detailing may do this too.

You need to use more discretion where you park; you need to use more discretion driving in heavy traffic, so as not to chip it up again.
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Old 06-09-2009, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Kent County, DE
697 posts, read 2,743,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
You need to use more discretion where you park; you need to use more discretion driving in heavy traffic, so as not to chip it up again.
That is surely easier said than done. I have the same problem with my Mitsu.
I am extremely careful where I park but it seems that it just doesn't matter. I usually get the chips in the grocery store parking lots. Just wish people were more aware when opening their doors. Often, it is done by children but not always. My car was new in August and I already have 4 chips on the door. One is actually a scrape with a dent.
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Old 06-09-2009, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by from PA View Post
That is surely easier said than done. I have the same problem with my Mitsu.
I am extremely careful where I park but it seems that it just doesn't matter. I usually get the chips in the grocery store parking lots. Just wish people were more aware when opening their doors. Often, it is done by children but not always. My car was new in August and I already have 4 chips on the door. One is actually a scrape with a dent.
Yeah, in the crowded Nawtheast it's harder, but, did you park "out" away from the building? It really helps to have a cosmetically trashed daily driver and keep your "good" car for nice days, weekend rides, etc.
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Old 06-10-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
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Since you plan on having someone else do it- I guess it really doesn't matter if you know how or not. But for those that do, follow along:

*Wash effected areas good with mild soap and water.
*Dry well.
*Use an ultra fine rubbing compound and buff area(s) to remove oxidized paint.
*Clean area with lacquer thinner to remove any contaminants.
*With matching paint color and a brush similar to a nail polish brush, add paint to the chipped area. The idea is to gradually add enough paint to over-fill the chip.
*After a 24hr drying period- with 1000 grit paper and water start sanding down the raised area of paint until smooth with the surrounding area.
*Then buff with rubbing compound to match the surrounding area.
*Apply a good coat of wax.
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Old 06-10-2009, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Tampa (by way of Omaha)
14,255 posts, read 21,151,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Since you plan on having someone else do it- I guess it really doesn't matter if you know how or not. But for those that do, follow along:

*Wash effected areas good with mild soap and water.
*Dry well.
*Use an ultra fine rubbing compound and buff area(s) to remove oxidized paint.
*Clean area with lacquer thinner to remove any contaminants.
*With matching paint color and a brush similar to a nail polish brush, add paint to the chipped area. The idea is to gradually add enough paint to over-fill the chip.
*After a 24hr drying period- with 1000 grit paper and water start sanding down the raised area of paint until smooth with the surrounding area.
*Then buff with rubbing compound to match the surrounding area.
*Apply a good coat of wax.
Sounds good, but you should wait at least a couple weeks before applying any waxes. The paint needs time to cure.
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Old 06-10-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
15,829 posts, read 50,939,683 times
Reputation: 15633
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Since you plan on having someone else do it- I guess it really doesn't matter if you know how or not. But for those that do, follow along:

*Wash effected areas good with mild soap and water.
*Dry well.
*Use an ultra fine rubbing compound and buff area(s) to remove oxidized paint.
*Clean area with lacquer thinner to remove any contaminants.
*With matching paint color and a brush similar to a nail polish brush, add paint to the chipped area. The idea is to gradually add enough paint to over-fill the chip.
*After a 24hr drying period- with 1000 grit paper and water start sanding down the raised area of paint until smooth with the surrounding area.
*Then buff with rubbing compound to match the surrounding area.
*Apply a good coat of wax.
You left out a couple of relatively critical steps, I have done what you list and got away with it; but for best results after cleaning the area to be painted with solvent, I would treat the bare metal with "metal prep", available at any body and paint supply, then I'd apply at least one coat of primer, then paint.

Eastwood has a kit to do the "leveling", using little stick on sanding discs, it's a very handy kit.

If you buy the stuff to do the touch-up, you will definitely have enough material to do many, many paint chips.

This is not rocket science, I have usually had much better luck doing this sort of work myself, since it is mostly time-consuming, and there is nothing any professional repairman of any stripe is more allergic to than time-consuming work.

But, if you are, pardon the term, a klutz, and no good with your hands, if you are not too particular about the quality of the final job, if you make a big salary at your "day job" and it's more cost effective to pay someone else to do this, good luck, my only suggestion is you probably don't want to go with the lowest bid.
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