U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-04-2013, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Saint Louis, MO
3,404 posts, read 8,075,290 times
Reputation: 2287

Advertisements

My advice, get your grandfather the car HE wants...not the car YOU want him to have. He's the one footing the bill here. You should probably spend a bit of time asking your grandfather what type of vehicle he's looking for, FWD or RWD, 4 cylinder, V6, or V8, American or Foreign, etc...once you've got some of that nailed down, try to find cars in these categories that work for him, and present those to him so he can provide input. When you're years older than 17, and have a good paying job, you can look around to find the car that YOU want to buy to replace your Camry.

PS - Congrats on getting in the Camry in the 1st place, should be a fantastic car for a 17 year old driver to learn safe driving practices, and car owner responsibilities.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-04-2013, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Funkotron, MA
1,203 posts, read 3,665,005 times
Reputation: 1814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
I'm not sure what's so scary about understeer with FWD. You let off the accelerator and the nose comes right back in line, unless you've overcooked it so much that recovery isn't possible -- in which case you're driving like an idiot and you probably would have binned a RWD car even sooner. And if the front end is too hot for a tidy recovery, a quick yank on the e-brake does wonders to bring the back end around.
Maybe scary isn't the right word, but it's a preference. Oversteer feels more "natural" to me. It makes sense to me that if you're turning and loose grip that the car will want to continue to rotate. I also think it's a bit safer. If you're skidding in a turn, going straight is usually the last place you want the car to go (otherwise you wouldn't be turning).

The e-brake isn't as easy to modulate as the throttle. Another drawback is that some cars have a pedal e-brake. You definitely can't use that safely.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: In an indoor space
7,685 posts, read 5,522,249 times
Reputation: 5153
I had a 1976 Chevy Monte Carlo with a posi-traction rear axle so-so snow tires and never got stuck.

FWD one can potentially get the short end of the proverbial stick if the front of the car isn't heavy enough no matter what tires are on there imo.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 07:57 AM
 
238 posts, read 561,702 times
Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by lol-its-good4U View Post
I had a 1976 Chevy Monte Carlo with a posi-traction rear axle so-so snow tires and never got stuck.

FWD one can potentially get the short end of the proverbial stick if the front of the car isn't heavy enough no matter what tires are on there imo.
??????????????

There still is the engine weight up front which is much heavier than anything put in the trunk of RWD.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Denver
3,250 posts, read 8,253,261 times
Reputation: 3210
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHICAGOLAND92 View Post
I'm a teen driver (17)
RWD , FWD, AWD.....it doesn't mater. Any car you get behind the wheel of will have more ability than you as a driver. Until you log more miles and time in the seat, spend time learning about how cars react, and spend time in a snow covered parking lot. You need to learn it is ok to slide around and learn how to deal with it.

AWD / FWD cars will be better in the snow for getting the car moving but once the car starts to slide it doesn't mater one bit what wheels are being driven by the engine.

The things that mater in the snow are the driver's abilities and the type of tires being used. I would say those things mater more than what type of drive train the car has.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Cole neighborhood, Denver, CO
1,123 posts, read 2,825,432 times
Reputation: 1252
Snow is not really a problem, but black ice is very dangerous in a powerful RWD car. Ten years ago I flipped my Z28 on a patch of black ice in DeKalb. I'd be dead if it weren't for my seatbelt. Does that answer your question?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,705 posts, read 96,362,009 times
Reputation: 29804
Quote:
Originally Posted by raveabouttoast View Post
Maybe scary isn't the right word, but it's a preference. Oversteer feels more "natural" to me. It makes sense to me that if you're turning and loose grip that the car will want to continue to rotate. I also think it's a bit safer. If you're skidding in a turn, going straight is usually the last place you want the car to go (otherwise you wouldn't be turning).

The e-brake isn't as easy to modulate as the throttle. Another drawback is that some cars have a pedal e-brake. You definitely can't use that safely.
Point taken on the pedal brake, or as is now becoming more common, an electronic push-button e-brake. Of course, at that point it's not really much of an "e" brake any more, just a parking brake.

However, the simple fact is for most people understeer is easier to detect and easier to correct once it's detected. That's why many car manufacturers will dial in mild understeer even on their RWD cars. It sure isn't much fun in the snow though, but that's where a proper e-brake comes in.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: WI
3,940 posts, read 10,072,718 times
Reputation: 2445
also, one of the benefits (in theory anyway) of fwd is that it "pulls" you thru the slick patch, compared to rwd which pushes you. So again all things considered, one should be able to maintain more control that way. I saw some testing years ago on the above, for all i know that could have came from a fwd manufacturer and the right driver in a rwd car could show more control in certain situations as well
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 81,193,687 times
Reputation: 36420
It depends on whether it is automatic or stick shift. There is an inherent danger in a FWD stick shift, in that suddenly touching the brake but not the clutch when there is no surface traction, locks the drive wheels and kills the engine, since front brakes dominate. But then, depressing the clutch, you lose engine braking. This is something that needs to be overcome by the driver and can be a difficult technique to master.

A second factor is that a FWD car has much less traction on an uphill grade than a RWD car, due to center of gravity and angular weight distribution. You can always get downhill, but loss of uphill traction is a clear disadvantage.

It''s been a long time (maybe 20 years) since I've driven in winter conditions, but I think I'd opt for the RWD if I had to drive all the time in winter. Or, at least, regard the FWD car as one with some disadvantages that need to be kept in mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2013, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis, MO
3,404 posts, read 8,075,290 times
Reputation: 2287
the electronic E-Brakes are still "Emergency" brakes, just don't have the ability to modulate them to adapt to different driving conditions the way you can with a manual E-Brake handle. I know the one present in the previous generation VW Passat is designed to stop the car in an "Emergency" situation. A friend of mine tested it once, and it's unpredictable in that you can't pre-determine the stopping distance the way you might with a manual E-Brake, but the car stops remarkably quick and provides maximum available braking for the specific situation.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Automotive

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:44 AM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top