Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Aviation
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-07-2010, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,564 posts, read 23,980,005 times
Reputation: 21237

Advertisements

If I was flying into combat, I'd want to be in a Fokker D.VII. Introduced in May of 1918, a month after Richthofen was killed in his Fokker Triplane, it combined everything that a fighter pilot could want. It had a superior rate of climb, could reach 21,000 feet, cruised at 124 mph, making it faster than all opposition aircraft save the Spad XIII, and had excellent handling characteristics which allowed it to turn with any opponent. And...it was reported to be quite easy to fly and quite stable even with hands off the stick.

If it was just for fun, I'd like to go up in a Fokker Eindekker 1, the monoplane upon which Fokker mounted the first ever synchronized machine gun which could fire through the propeller. It could only make around 75 mph at top speed, had a ceiling of just 11,500 feet, and it took nearly 25 minutes for it to reach that. Despite these shortcomings, when it first appeared and for several months after that, it was the terror of the skies because Britain and France had nothing with which to counter it.

I would not wish to fly the Nieuport 28, the French fighter which had a tendency to lose its upper wing in a steep dive, and I certainly would not want to go anywhere near a DeHavilland DH 4 bomber which located its gas tank in the area between the pilot and the observer, and garnered the nickname "The Flying Coffin." The DeHavilland was a British design, built in and by the USA, the only combat aircraft that America produced during the war which saw acrion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-08-2010, 02:40 PM
 
33,387 posts, read 34,646,638 times
Reputation: 20027
i would go with one of three aircraft from that era;

the fokker triplane-one of its biggest advantages was the ability to turn quite tightly using the rudder only in an uncoordinated turn. there was a german pilot that took on several allied fighters in a dog fight, one of the things he did was make 180 turns using rudder only to keep from being shot down.

the french spad-it was a good all around fighter

the sopwith camel-it was a good fighter, but you had to have a steady hand to maintain control over the aircraft, and it had a wicked left turn capability.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2010, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,564 posts, read 23,980,005 times
Reputation: 21237
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbohm View Post
i would go with one of three aircraft from that era;

the fokker triplane-one of its biggest advantages was the ability to turn quite tightly using the rudder only in an uncoordinated turn. there was a german pilot that took on several allied fighters in a dog fight, one of the things he did was make 180 turns using rudder only to keep from being shot down.

the french spad-it was a good all around fighter

the sopwith camel-it was a good fighter, but you had to have a steady hand to maintain control over the aircraft, and it had a wicked left turn capability.
The Spad XIII would be my second choice. It was an extremely durable aircraft and was slightly faster than the Fokker D VII, but the Fokker could climb faster and outturn it.

Among the reasons that the Camel was so hard to fly was that it used a rotary engine, the torque from which was constantly yanking the aircraft into a left turn. In order to fly it steady the pilot had to continuiously compensate with the controls. It turned left so sharply because it was always trying to turn left when the controls were in neutral.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2010, 03:58 PM
 
783 posts, read 812,333 times
Reputation: 243
The IL-2 Sturmovik.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2010, 12:10 AM
 
15,913 posts, read 20,124,173 times
Reputation: 7693
The Fokker D.VII, had a decent speed and performed well in high altitude fights
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2010, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,560 posts, read 14,402,311 times
Reputation: 10164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
The IL-2 Sturmovik.
Definitely the premier combat aircraft of WWI.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2010, 02:22 AM
 
27,957 posts, read 39,606,310 times
Reputation: 26197
I have a set of plans for a replica Nieuport N11. I have visions of building and flying it someday. Hopefully sooner than later.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2010, 03:14 AM
 
2,245 posts, read 4,216,625 times
Reputation: 2152
DR1. Best fighter of the war, and yet another testament to the mastery of German engineering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2010, 07:20 PM
 
594 posts, read 1,774,010 times
Reputation: 754
The 1938 movie Dawn Patrol was a drama-filled account of WWI aerial combat.
It was a remake of Howard Hawk's 1930 Academy Award winning version, which starred Richard Barthelmess and Douglas Fairbanks jr. The 1938 version starred Errol Flynn, Basil Rathbone, David Niven and Donald Crisp. Also, Wings, a 1927 silent WWI movie, was another popular film depicting WWI air battles.

The "Fokker" planes used in Dawn Patrol were reconfigured Travel Air 4000 planes built in Wichita, KS. They were jokingly referred to as "Wichita Fokkers." An interesting aside is that the Travel Air company built a steam-powered plane that actually flew in test flight. However, it dissipated more water than could be practically carried. I hope the following link works as it gives some interesting information on aviation of that era:

Aircraft Market Place » 2009 » March
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2010, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,564 posts, read 23,980,005 times
Reputation: 21237
I've noticed that there seems to be a plentiful supply of Royal Aircraft Factory SE 5A's and little else available for making motion pictures. In "The Blue Max", "Darling Lili" and "Ace's High", all of the depicted British and French fighters were SE 5A's. An SE 5A filled in for Roy Brown's Sopwith Camel in the 1971 flick, "Von Richthofen and Brown." There seems to be a greater variety of surviving or duplicated German aircraft, those same movies just mentioned featured Albatross, Phalz and Fokker (Dr1 and D-VII) fighters.

Nowadays, with computer generated effects, they can depict anything that they wish.

In the recent "Red Baron" which was a lousy movie, they did at least accurately depict Von Richthofen flying an Albatross for the majority of the film. He scored 60 of his 80 victories in the Albatross, the last 20 in the Fokker Dr1 Triplane. It was good for the producers to resist the impulse to just have him in the triplane the whole film on the basis of "That's what everyone in the audience is expecting except a handful of nerd historians."

A 1986 movie I have not seen, largely because it was so terrible that while it cost 18 million to make, it took in less than two million at the box office and has never been released on dvd (there was a VHS tape, but it rapidly vanished from circulation) is "Sky Bandits" (aka "Gunbus".) I wouldn't mind getting a look at it for no reason other than they do indeed have a working Vickers FB5 Gunbus, which was a pusher plane (propeller located behind the cockpit which literally pushes rather than pulls the aircraft.) Here is a picture:
2522gunbus2522 image by TEXANTOMCAT on Photobucket
and one with a rear view:
http://www.military-art.com/mall/art...dhm1637ref.jpg

and here is a link to a nice long segment from the film where you can see the Gunbus in action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnmI5btQSd8
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Aviation
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top