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Old 10-02-2012, 04:27 AM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
29,007 posts, read 50,153,143 times
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I always sit in back of the plane close to the tail.


A test crash of a Boeing 727 in the Sonoran desert to learn more about what actually happens to passengers when a plane goes down found that simply bracing for impact could help save lives.

In one of the most ambitious tests ever undertaken in the name of airline safety, Discovery TV had a Boeing 727 equipped with more than a half a million dollars worth of crash test dummies, 38 specialized cameras and sensors, and a crew of incredibly daring pilots.

Bracing for Impact Ups Chances of Surviving Plane Crash, Test Crash Finds - Yahoo!
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Old 10-16-2012, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
52,842 posts, read 31,124,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
I always sit in back of the plane close to the tail.


A test crash of a Boeing 727 in the Sonoran desert to learn more about what actually happens to passengers when a plane goes down found that simply bracing for impact could help save lives.

In one of the most ambitious tests ever undertaken in the name of airline safety, Discovery TV had a Boeing 727 equipped with more than a half a million dollars worth of crash test dummies, 38 specialized cameras and sensors, and a crew of incredibly daring pilots.

Bracing for Impact Ups Chances of Surviving Plane Crash, Test Crash Finds - Yahoo!
They did the same thing with a Boeing 707 back in 1981, with 1981 test dummies and camera technology, and if I remember correctly, they determined that fire from aviation fuel was the leading cause of fatalaties in crashes. They showed the inside of the cabin as it was being engulfed in fire very quickly as the fuel tanks exploded on impact, and I remember them saying that only a small number of passengers would have survived in an actual crash, which was really a simulated very hard landing on dry terrain. They also determined that without the fire, there would have been a lot more survivors.
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:51 PM
 
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The 727 crash is being discussed here: //www.city-data.com/forum/aviat...ane-crash.html
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Old 10-20-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: NYPD"s 30th Precinct
2,522 posts, read 4,827,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnum Mike View Post
They did the same thing with a Boeing 707 back in 1981, with 1981 test dummies and camera technology, and if I remember correctly, they determined that fire from aviation fuel was the leading cause of fatalaties in crashes. They showed the inside of the cabin as it was being engulfed in fire very quickly as the fuel tanks exploded on impact, and I remember them saying that only a small number of passengers would have survived in an actual crash, which was really a simulated very hard landing on dry terrain. They also determined that without the fire, there would have been a lot more survivors.
Indeed. Most aircraft accidents are low impact crashes, that is they hit ground at a fairly shallow angle, and usually on or near a runway. While there are plenty of other factors, if there's no fire, these are generally survivable (at least compared to a high impact crash, or a nose dive into the ground).

Jet fuel can burn incredibly hot, especially inside an enclosed space. I've personally been right in the middle of an aircraft mock up during training that reached 1,800 degrees. Granted, this was a propane fire and the aircraft was made of solid steel, but still not a pretty environment. I was in a full proximity suit and could only withstand about 3-4 minutes in there. A passenger wouldn't last a second in that.
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Old 10-21-2012, 12:25 AM
 
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Just wanted to share a hopefully funny, true story.Way back in 1971 while stationed in Vietnam with an asslt helocopter company,I was off duty in the hooch in my "room',one of my bunkmates had a friend of his there having a beer.without any warning his friend strarted to jump straight up into the air..........apparently as high and as long as he could...........I asked him "what the hell you doin man?"

He replied dead serious.........." I'm practicing my crash jump.....I figure if i'm shot down and we are gonna crash........if I can time my jump just right before we hit........I'll survive......."
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