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Old 07-18-2013, 08:46 PM
 
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The preliminary stats for plane boardings were released by the Faa for calendar year 2012.
The three NYC airports are only 18.8% over Atlanta airport.

Hartsfield - Jackson Atlanta International 45,798,809

John F Kennedy International 24,520,943
Newark Liberty International 17,035,098
La Guardia 12,818,717

Do you think that Atlanta could not just be the largest airport in the USA, but Atlanta could ever displace NYC as the urban area with the most flight passengers?

I don't understand how Charlotte, NC maintains it's position as a top 10 airport. The urban area is relatively small. I can imagine a scenario where a combined AA-USAir begins to phase out Charlotte in favor of Miami. It will be difficult to maintain three East Coast hubs for foreign traffic (Miami, Charlotte, JFK).

If this happens I could see Delta and Atlanta airport picking up some business and pushing Atlanta even bigger.

Any thoughts?
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:18 PM
 
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I guess that it's possible. Consolidation in the airline industry will probably lead to consolidation in hub airports, with lower-tier hub airports losing traffic. I don't know how much that ATL will grow, since the DAL/NWA merger has already taken place. CLT will probably suffer the same fate as PIT, CVG, and STL. I wouldn't be surprised to see PHL lose some international flights since it is so close to JFK. An airline needs only so many hubs in a small geographic area.
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Old 07-19-2013, 05:04 AM
Status: "Wishing all the best of health and peace!" (set 11 days ago)
 
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Atlanta is a very busy hub. So it might be possible in the future.
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:32 AM
 
Location: The City
22,379 posts, read 38,796,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
The preliminary stats for plane boardings were released by the Faa for calendar year 2012.
The three NYC airports are only 18.8% over Atlanta airport.

Hartsfield - Jackson Atlanta International 45,798,809

John F Kennedy International 24,520,943
Newark Liberty International 17,035,098
La Guardia 12,818,717

Do you think that Atlanta could not just be the largest airport in the USA, but Atlanta could ever displace NYC as the urban area with the most flight passengers?

I don't understand how Charlotte, NC maintains it's position as a top 10 airport. The urban area is relatively small. I can imagine a scenario where a combined AA-USAir begins to phase out Charlotte in favor of Miami. It will be difficult to maintain three East Coast hubs for foreign traffic (Miami, Charlotte, JFK).

If this happens I could see Delta and Atlanta airport picking up some business and pushing Atlanta even bigger.

Any thoughts?
You forgot the 4th in PHL and a mini in OAD and Reagan in DC

maybe in throughput not in O&D though
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: The City
22,379 posts, read 38,796,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pito_Chueco View Post
I guess that it's possible. Consolidation in the airline industry will probably lead to consolidation in hub airports, with lower-tier hub airports losing traffic. I don't know how much that ATL will grow, since the DAL/NWA merger has already taken place. CLT will probably suffer the same fate as PIT, CVG, and STL. I wouldn't be surprised to see PHL lose some international flights since it is so close to JFK. An airline needs only so many hubs in a small geographic area.
JFK will continue to handle mostly NYC direct Int'l travel and Philly will likely continue with connecting and local Int'l activity
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:07 PM
 
Location: New York
1,999 posts, read 4,987,381 times
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Default hub and spoke a thing of the past

The industry is moving away from the hub and spoke machine- it is a problematic and a time waster for the pax. ATL is likely to decrease in traffic while the airlines dismantle their hub and spoke machines, while the NY area increases due to superior O & D traffic.
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Old 07-19-2013, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
15,410 posts, read 25,725,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samyn on the green View Post
The industry is moving away from the hub and spoke machine- it is a problematic and a time waster for the pax. ATL is likely to decrease in traffic while the airlines dismantle their hub and spoke machines, while the NY area increases due to superior O & D traffic.
Where did you hear this?
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:02 PM
 
2,242 posts, read 2,997,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samyn on the green View Post
The industry is moving away from the hub and spoke machine- it is a problematic and a time waster for the pax. ATL is likely to decrease in traffic while the airlines dismantle their hub and spoke machines, while the NY area increases due to superior O & D traffic.
Hub and spoke is here to stay for the foreseeable future. The only hubs being dismantled, are those deemed redundant due to mergers. While detrimental to passengers to some extent, hubs are very efficient for the airlines. While O&D is important, it's not the only component used to determine a successful hub. Coastal cities of considerable population, will always have an abundance of flights, but due to their geographical location, they are not optimum for placement of a domestic hub. You need regional hubs placed about the country, to feed passengers to/from locations within that geographical area. The post-deregulation business model of the legacy carriers is based on this. The make-up of aircraft fleets are based on it, and infrastructure at airports is based on it. It would be cost prohibitive to abandon the current system at this point.
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Old 07-20-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Limbo
6,513 posts, read 7,530,523 times
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It is possible in the long-term, but I doubt it will happen in the next decade. ATL will continue to compete with ORD and PEK for the busiest in pax and aircraft movements, though. DL has removed MEM as a hub, so perhaps that would increase ATL traffic in the future, I'm not sure.
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Old 07-20-2013, 10:22 AM
 
Location: NYPD"s 30th Precinct
2,565 posts, read 5,500,639 times
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Those numbers should be much higher. Are you only counting enplanements? I'm sure they can be broken down any which way, but generally in the industry, when talking about how "busy" an airport is, we count all passengers enplaned, deplaned, and connecting passengers. ATL had a passenger count of over 95 million in 2012 going by that.

JFK was about 49 million, EWR had 34 million, and LGA had 24 million, which puts ATL about 15 million behind the total of the three NYC airports combined, which is not insurmountable, depending on the growth rates of the NYC airports.

Hartsfield's problem is that it has all of its eggs in one basket (Delta). About 80% of ATL's traffic is connecting, leaving only about one in five passengers actually starting or ending their trip in Atlanta. In the short term, I don't see Hartsfield's traffic number declining, but remember that nothing lasts forever. Once monolith names in the aviation industry such as Pan Am, Eastern, TWA, etc... have all gone the way of the dinosaur.

The other thing that would hurt ATL is an industry shift to more point to point routes with a lower emphasis on connecting passengers through a hub, which is Hartsfield's primary purpose.

I'd say that within a few years Beijing will overtake ATL in total passenger traffic. They're at 82 million right now, and their numbers are rising at a faster rate than Atlanta's.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
I don't understand how Charlotte, NC maintains it's position as a top 10 airport.
Simple - connecting US Airways traffic.
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