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Old 10-21-2006, 10:20 AM
 
13 posts, read 127,404 times
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I am currently doing research for a blogspot that I have created (The MALL HALL OF FAME). This blog is an entirely non-commercial enterprise on my part, and is comprised of articles, images and artwork for America's Post War shopping centers. I hope to do articles about a couple of Metro-Baltimore's regional malls; nameley MONDAWMIN and HARUNDALE.

I was just wondering whether anyone on the forum would care to reminisce about these shopping centers..........as it is nearly (if not) impossible to find out very much about them in their early days. I would be more than glad to credit anyone (in my finished article[s]) who can provide any pertinent info.

For the record, MONDAWMIN MALL opened in 1956. Apparently, Sears was its main anchor store in those days. The mall was designed/built by James Rouse, who was one of the pioneers in shopping centers in post war America.

This is about all the information that I have on MONDAWMIN MALL. I would like to ascertain that MONDAWMIN was, indeed, an open-air-type shopping mall in its early days. Any other details about the 1950's/1960's-era shopping center would be a great help to me in my endeavor.

About HARUNDALE: It was also designed and built by James Rouse, opening in October, 1958. HARUNDALE is credited as being the first enclosed shopping mall east of the Mississippi. Its original anchor stores were Hochschild-Kohn, Read Drug, G.C. Murphy and S.S. Kresge 5 & 10 stores, and a Food Fair supermarket. I have also heard about a "rock" that was -apparently- at the center of the mall. It would be interesting to find out any details about "the rock".

Of course, the original HARUNDALE MALL was "wrecking ball renovated" in 1998 (replaced by a "power", strip shopping center). The old Hochschild-Kohn (by then a Value City) is about all that remains of the circa-1958 mall. Does anyone on the forum here recall the original HARUNDALE MALL?

Yup.....this is going WAY back in the city's history. Hopefully, these, and other, questions about the "Balmer", "classic mall era" shopping centers can be answered, so that these details can be recorded for posterity before so much time passes that no one can even remember them.

Thanks everyone for reading..........and -especially- thanks for any input that any of you Baltimoreans can provide.

"Mid Century Mod"
North Georgia
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Old 10-25-2006, 12:58 PM
 
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My mother lived in Baltimore back in the sixties and remember the old mall. She was astonished by the changes and the new mall that is present.
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Old 10-26-2006, 07:03 PM
 
13 posts, read 127,404 times
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Default Harundale Mall.....Plaza:

Hi guy,

Too bad your mom isn't on this forum. I'll bet she could give me a whole lot of info about the olden-days (original) Harundale Mall. I imagine that it was quite a difference to see the present-day "power center" (Harundale Plaza) in the place of the old mall.

Cheers,

Mid Century Mod
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Old 12-07-2006, 11:11 PM
 
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Default Harundale mall

Hello, my name is Scott Rogers. I have very fond memories of that mall. My grandmother Mary Sweeney worked at the Italian Delight forever. My mother(Elaine Rogers-(Sweeney) used to take me there to see her for lunch almost 3 times a week. Man they had the best pizza. She always had a slice waiting for me along with donald duck orange juice. That place was her heart, and when they changed things, there was nothing left for her. If anyone remembers her, she was the one who always greeted you with a warming smile, and said, "how you doin' hun?" She was the heart and soul there, to be honest she was the pulse that kept it going for as long as it did. She passed on a couple of years ago in her sleep-very deserving way to go for the person she was and always will be. It would be great to hear from all that remember her and or the establishment. Maybe even share stories. She was a short lady with glasses and grayish hair, but always had that warming smile with a pleasant greeting. Happy holidays to all!
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Old 12-11-2006, 01:47 PM
 
83 posts, read 444,762 times
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I grew up about five miles from the Harundale Mall and remember watching its construction from the bus on my way to school. Harundale was a lower middle class housing development constructed just after WW II. It consisted of hundreds of cookie cutter, identical houses, each a different color. There were two areas on the east and west sides of the Ritchie Highway. One side was all rentals and the other side was sold to homeowners. The latter side was the site of home improvements and expansions, while the rental side seemed to stagnate. Later, the rental side was sold to homeowners and became similarly improved. Unfortunately, all I remember about the mall was a hobby shop where I bought Lionel Trains. I remember driving alone to the mall on the first day that I had my driver's license. The rock does not ring a bell. I remember going to the Mondawmin (are you sure it is not spelled Mondomin?) Mall with my HS girlfriend. I believe there was a theater there. Even then the surrounding neighborhoods were not the safest, and we only went there a time or two.
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Old 12-13-2006, 02:06 PM
 
13 posts, read 127,404 times
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Default James Rouse's HARUNDALE & MONDAWMIN malls:

Hello ECLOEBL,

Thanks for the mall memories.

I am still trying to find someone (anyone) who remembers the physical layout of the old HARUNDALE MALL. I guess that this shopping center's existance is now so far back in history that nobody remembers it all too well.

MONDAWMIN is, at least, still there. I have determined that it (in 1956) was an open-air shopping center. Maybe I'll dig up some more related info...hee hee.

Anyway, thanks so much for posting.

Have a happy holiday season!

Den
MidCenturyMod
Georgia
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Old 12-14-2006, 12:08 PM
 
83 posts, read 444,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mid Century Mod View Post
Hello ECLOEBL,

Thanks for the mall memories.

I am still trying to find someone (anyone) who remembers the physical layout of the old HARUNDALE MALL. I guess that this shopping center's existance is now so far back in history that nobody remembers it all too well.

MONDAWMIN is, at least, still there. I have determined that it (in 1956) was an open-air shopping center. Maybe I'll dig up some more related info...hee hee.

Anyway, thanks so much for posting.

Have a happy holiday season!

Den
MidCenturyMod
Georgia
I think I can help you there. The Harundale Mall was shaped like an L. Unlike many newer malls, it was on a single level. Hockshild Kohn department store was the anchor at the north end and was open to the mall itself. It had entrances to the parking lot to the east and west. There was an area in the mall at the apex of the L where teenagers congregated. I believe that may have been the location of the rock that you described. I vaguely recall that there was also a bird cage there. Read's was a chain drug store and was located at the south end of the mall. It was a large store with its main entrance on the mall and a small entrance to the parking lot. Unfortunately, I was last there about forty years ago, and my memories are dim.
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Old 12-14-2006, 09:29 PM
 
13 posts, read 127,404 times
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Default Harundale Mall Physical Layout:

Thanks for the mall rememberances, Ecloebl.

I have an old aerial view picture of Harundale. From it, I tried to draw out a layout plan of the mall...It is on the web at...

http://dsmith102.photosite.com/Album...Mall_Plan.html

I couldn't really tell much from the old aerial view...as to how the mall's corridors were situated. You recall it as an "L-shaped" mall....with the Hochschild-Kohn on the north end....and the Read Drug on the south end....."the rock" at the confluence of this "L".

The mall, as a whole, appeared to be an oblong square. It will be interesting
to figure out how this "L-shaped" mall corridor fit into the oblong square.

If you can, check out my drawing (at the URL above)...and see where I am going wrong here.

Thanks much.....

Mid Century Mod
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Old 12-15-2006, 12:10 PM
 
83 posts, read 444,762 times
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Looking at your diagram, I believe there was only a single corridor. What you are calling the main entrance was near the HK store, and it led back to the L or left hand turn I described. I believe there was also a back entrance on the west side near the HK store.
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Old 12-16-2006, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Cheswolde
1,977 posts, read 6,184,466 times
Reputation: 565
Default Mondawmin

I have written a column about Mondawmin, which should appear in The Examiner during the week of Dec. 17. In brief, Mondawmin became the victim of white fear. When it was planned for an old estate that had belonged to a grandson of Alex. Brown (of the brokerage firm fame), the area was white. However, by the time the mall opened in 1956, panic had gripped the area. Whites fled in droves. They were accustomed to living in a segregated city and wanted to have nothing to do with black shoppers at Mondawmin. Fancy out-of-town stores broke their leases, anchors fled.
My article details all this and gives enrollment figures for nearby Gwynns Falls Parkway elementary school to gauge the rampant rate of racial change.
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