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Old 04-14-2015, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
2,346 posts, read 1,683,224 times
Reputation: 739

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite_heights77 View Post
I lived in Reservior Hill on Eutaw Place! I was bored!
Has no validity to the fact that I would live in one of those houses and go downtown for entertainment.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Eutaw Place/Reservoir Hill
68 posts, read 246,216 times
Reputation: 35
This is getting slightly off-topic, but after reading the Salon article and then the city-data thread, I'm really struck by how much more knowledgeable some of our posters, like Woodlands and dogpark, are about actual Baltimore neighborhood history and the nuts-and-bolts of what has happened and is happening on the ground here t -- tand the actual reasons why -- than is the "award-winning writer" of the Salon piece, Mr. D. Watkins, who, as others have pointed out, is just flat-out wrong in some of his analysis, and his opinions are so hyperbolic and over-the-top as to be laughable. "My city is gone, my history depleted, ruined and undocumented," Watkins writes. Has Watkins developed severe cataracts since the days he watched Pooh Bear shoot hoops at Somerset Courts, because though the high-rise projects are gone, there is no shortage of unmolested Baltimore ghetto extant, one only needs a functioning set of eyeballs and the time it would take to drive around for hours and take it all in to know this, the huge swaths of it in East, West and SW Baltimore. And for every block that JHU taketh away in Middle East, you've got newly-developing blocks in formerly stable NW Baltimore taking their place. And then some. So take heart, D. Watkins!

And it's funny that Mr. Watkins doesn't even mention the one historically black Bmore neighborhood that could arguably be said to have truly gentrified (in the actual technical meaning of the word, not misused as Watkins does) to a different predominant skin shade, and that's Sharp Leadenhall (an example brought up by a city-data poster). Some of us could write a decent article for Salon or HuffPo too --- but it wouldn't be as sexy, because it would be more accurate, balanced, well-informed, and less intentionally inflammatory and finger-pointing-y. But that's what sells, isn't it?
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Old 06-22-2015, 01:25 PM
 
6,884 posts, read 10,440,484 times
Reputation: 2036
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginbelt View Post
This is getting slightly off-topic, but after reading the Salon article and then the city-data thread, I'm really struck by how much more knowledgeable some of our posters, like Woodlands and dogpark, are about actual Baltimore neighborhood history and the nuts-and-bolts of what has happened and is happening on the ground here t -- tand the actual reasons why -- than is the "award-winning writer" of the Salon piece, Mr. D. Watkins, who, as others have pointed out, is just flat-out wrong in some of his analysis, and his opinions are so hyperbolic and over-the-top as to be laughable. "My city is gone, my history depleted, ruined and undocumented," Watkins writes. Has Watkins developed severe cataracts since the days he watched Pooh Bear shoot hoops at Somerset Courts, because though the high-rise projects are gone, there is no shortage of unmolested Baltimore ghetto extant, one only needs a functioning set of eyeballs and the time it would take to drive around for hours and take it all in to know this, the huge swaths of it in East, West and SW Baltimore. And for every block that JHU taketh away in Middle East, you've got newly-developing blocks in formerly stable NW Baltimore taking their place. And then some. So take heart, D. Watkins!

And it's funny that Mr. Watkins doesn't even mention the one historically black Bmore neighborhood that could arguably be said to have truly gentrified (in the actual technical meaning of the word, not misused as Watkins does) to a different predominant skin shade, and that's Sharp Leadenhall (an example brought up by a city-data poster). Some of us could write a decent article for Salon or HuffPo too --- but it wouldn't be as sexy, because it would be more accurate, balanced, well-informed, and less intentionally inflammatory and finger-pointing-y. But that's what sells, isn't it?

Unfortunately.. division and divisiveness sells in this town (and in the USA as a whole) Its easier to shout, blame and react.. than it is to be proactive and unifying... Only when a tragedy.. Charleston, SC or Baltimore Uprising do people want to come togehter and sing a unifying song.. and even then the terms are usually being dicated by folks that have alterior motives thus using the incident as a soap box to enhance their own status... I was told that funds are "flowing" towards programs that benefit young black males in this City following the riots as the Mayor and others now seek to show that they are doing something and trying to address the issue...I think that that is great.. the problem is those that may be getting the money may be the organizations that are the most politically connected and potentially incompetent thus the results on the ground.. i.e. the kids will not receive any benefit.

Part of the reason why I have an issue with articles like this one.. is.. Why look at the influx of these residents and developers as a negative ? The author should say.. how can I (we the neighborhood) leverage this economic interest in our community for the benefit of ALL residents. Have you approached them to talk about the community ? The meeting he walked out on could have been used as an opportunity to do just that.. Even if they were not initially interested in what you are talking about.. sell them on the community benefit by showing how it benefits them.

The new Starbucks could hire residents from the community. Host a community meeting or sponsor an event... A new business like a Starbucks will make other businesses both chain and local pay attention to your area.. I would be joining forces with Starbucks to tout the community as a place that is "open for business" or "welcoming for residents/businesses". I would use my influence as a community activitist to build a bridge between the business community/developers and the community focusing on areas of common interest. .Obviously, Starbucks doesnt want to be in a high crime area or a on a dirty street.. MOST community residents dont either.. Organize a monthly clean up.. maybe Starbucks will give everyone coffee or gift cards after they clean the street... That benefits everyone.. If Starbucks didnt come to the community.. then it just a vacant storefront or worse.. a liquor store.. Baltimoreans need to learn how to leverage their community resources and work with property owners, business owners, and the City to get what they (we) want.. Being a NIMBY or stuck in Nostalgia..may sell articles and get readers but it does NOTHING for those who live in the neighborhoods that you write about....
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:12 PM
 
1,310 posts, read 1,190,272 times
Reputation: 797
I have listened to Watkins on the Rodericks show a couple of times and I have been profoundly unimpressed. He seems to be a caricature of a black progressive with no unique views of his own - just standard issue stuff with no feel for the tradeoffs that Baltimoreans face every day. In my opinion, his Salon article was a waste of pixels and his radio commentary is a waste of air time. He is the kind of lock step liberal/progressive that conservatives accuse everyone in Baltimore of being but most aren't. We need problem solvers not emoters.

Last edited by pwduvall; 06-22-2015 at 10:28 PM..
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Old 06-22-2015, 10:23 PM
 
158 posts, read 185,354 times
Reputation: 140
I give the under for 5 years until the starbucks and chiptole are burnt to the ground because of a perceived slight.
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Old 04-11-2016, 05:12 AM
 
5,289 posts, read 6,108,410 times
Reputation: 1135
So, what is preventing African Americans from gentrifying their own neighborhoods?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
This writer is somewhat misguided..He is placing blame on things that may be related in the broad scheme of things but not directly applicable to what is happening on the ground in Baltimore. People tend to try to but Baltimore and the plight of African American neighborhoods in the same category as DC with U Street are Harlem in NYC and its not the same. Mostly working class white neighborhoods are being transformed into yupping or upscale neighborhoods in Baltimore not Black neighborhoods.. and the few that are experiencing change.. its occurring at a snails pace (ie the blocks north of Patterson Park and maybe a few areas west of Bolton Hill) The JHU redevelopment demolished a community that was already on its knees not the healthy thriving neighborood that he remembers from the 70s 80s and possibly the 90s.

Baltimore is an old City a landmark that is considered African American could have been Jewish or Polish two generations prior thus properties have changed hands and since purpose over the years throughout the City with each group mourning the loss of its forefathers. African Americans that had means..left these neighboroods just like the people before them.. Should they have stayed and "stuck it out" and dug in their heels? Maybe.. but like any other "group" people make invidual decisions and not necessarily operating as one unit..though they may take leads from each other.

The best attempt and opportunity to "save" African American history in Baltimore in the physical sense is not necessarily the old barbershop on the corner of Fulton and North.. or the corner bar in Edmonson Village.. but to look at cultural institutions that have had a place in the City's foundation/history.. which exist today along Pennsy Ave. This should be ground zero for a collective movement to preserve and celebrate African American History.. And in a City that is dominated by African American leaders, business people, and historians.. it hasnt quite cultivated into collective action. I have said before.. here you have and area that is historically and culturally relavent to not only the City but to America. It has two subway stations, a historic market, a bowling alley/skate rink, a commercial core and is close to downtown... It has all the right elements of a Beale Street or even a Bourbon Street but on a much more localized scale.. Why arent the powers that be leveraging some of their collective "powers" to encourage the preservation, promotion and ultimately the enhancement of this district?

To me that is more important that worring about a Starbucks knocking down an African American business.. which by the way I dont believe has ever happened in the Baltimore context.. but to Archie Bunkers corner bar is a different story....
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Old 04-12-2016, 06:27 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 808,582 times
Reputation: 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
This writer is somewhat misguided..He is placing blame on things that may be related in the broad scheme of things but not directly applicable to what is happening on the ground in Baltimore. People tend to try to but Baltimore and the plight of African American neighborhoods in the same category as DC with U Street are Harlem in NYC and its not the same. Mostly working class white neighborhoods are being transformed into yupping or upscale neighborhoods
This is true. Generally, the poorer white neighborhoods were in a more convenient location. The Middle East event is one of the first (I believe there is only one precedent) major gentrification events happening to poor black neighborhoods.

The issue with gentrification is that the people in the neighborhood will eventually not be able to afford the rent and then are forced to live in worse ghettoes until they are also gentrified.
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,689,398 times
Reputation: 1195
Quote:
Originally Posted by suz1023 View Post
If a person feels strongly about preserving something which is of value to them, why not do the work to preserve it?
Because that would be hard and require more effort than complaining on the internet.
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