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Old 01-05-2021, 05:25 PM
 
6,884 posts, read 10,438,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digger 68 View Post
The northern part of the city out of towners always overlook. Harbor, Harbor, harbor.......
Yeah.. I never understood that.. The Harbor is why people should VISIT Baltimore (now more so Harbor East and points east) North Baltimore is the reason why people should want to LIVE in Baltimore. This is not to disrespect any other neighborhood(s) but the North Baltimore has an array of housing stock and neighborhoods that should meet most peoples interest and places where one can choose to live as opposed to some areas where some people are forced to end up or live in for one reason or another.. assuming they can get around your point... TAXES. The area has the best City Schools and you still have access to Private Schools and the more affordable Catholic Schools if it fits your budget.
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Old 01-05-2021, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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I live in Charles Village (2.5 miles north of downtown) and I see a lot of "apartment for rent" signs in my neighborhood. They are mostly located inside the row houses. I live in one and consider this a good, safe neighborhood.

Many Johns Hopkins University security guards patrol the area or they stand on certain street corners.
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Old 01-05-2021, 05:29 PM
 
6,884 posts, read 10,438,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John13 View Post
I live in Charles Village (2.5 miles north of downtown) and I see a lot of "apartment for rent" signs in my neighborhood. They are mostly located inside the row houses. I live in one and consider this a good, safe neighborhood.

Many Johns Hopkins University security guards patrol the area or they stand on certain street corners.
Yeah.. they are literally on every corner around JHU.. they are very visible
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Old 01-06-2021, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia Pa
921 posts, read 572,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
Yeah.. I never understood that.. The Harbor is why people should VISIT Baltimore (now more so Harbor East and points east) North Baltimore is the reason why people should want to LIVE in Baltimore. This is not to disrespect any other neighborhood(s) but the North Baltimore has an array of housing stock and neighborhoods that should meet most peoples interest and places where one can choose to live as opposed to some areas where some people are forced to end up or live in for one reason or another.. assuming they can get around your point... TAXES. The area has the best City Schools and you still have access to Private Schools and the more affordable Catholic Schools if it fits your budget.
So I looked into several northern neighborhoods - mainly around Johns Hopkins. They all seem quite pricey (very limited stock under 250k and most ranging in the 300-400k area) and very large (2000-4000 sq. ft). So just so I better understand, why are most locals down on the Fells Point, Harbor East, Canton areas? They seem to be some of the better situated locations where one can find a modest (2 bed/1 bath 800 sq. ft. or so) and appropriately-priced rowhome for under 200k - in some instances closer to 150-175k - with taxes under or around 3k. I've also added Federal Hill to my search area, but they seem a bit higher priced and the taxes are almost double what they are across the harbor.

Anyway, is there something I'm missing about these neighborhoods that make them undesirable?
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Old 01-06-2021, 08:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennsport View Post
So I looked into several northern neighborhoods - mainly around Johns Hopkins. They all seem quite pricey (very limited stock under 250k and most ranging in the 300-400k area) and very large (2000-4000 sq. ft). So just so I better understand, why are most locals down on the Fells Point, Harbor East, Canton areas? They seem to be some of the better situated locations where one can find a modest (2 bed/1 bath 800 sq. ft. or so) and appropriately-priced rowhome for under 200k - in some instances closer to 150-175k - with taxes under or around 3k. I've also added Federal Hill to my search area, but they seem a bit higher priced and the taxes are almost double what they are across the harbor.

Anyway, is there something I'm missing about these neighborhoods that make them undesirable?
I wouldn't say locals are "down" on the waterfront neighborhoods. There's a bit of a divide. There's truth to that the waterfront neighborhoods attracts a lot of young college grads and that can come with a partying atmosphere not everyone likes. Fells is a major center for bars and nightlife, as is Federal Hill. And these grads are usually from the suburbs, move to the city for a few years, then move back out to the suburbs so their entire Baltimore experience is restricted to just the waterfront areas and they have no knowledge of the northern Baltimore neighborhoods, which is a wonderful part of town. There can be a transitional versus long term resident divide. However, there are plenty of long term residents in the waterfront areas too.

To use a Philadelphia a comparison, you get many young people moving to Queens Village, South Philadelphia, Northern Liberties and so on, who have no idea about Chestnut Hill or Mount Airy.

I wouldn't stop you from buying a cheap 200-250k rowhouse in Federal Hill or Fells Point. Just be aware they won't likely appreciate much, are at risk of potential loss in value (though I think that's unlikely going forward for various reasons). However, parking will always be a problem. If your daughter is commuting daily to Columbia or the Loyola campus in North Baltimore, she will find parking a major problem anywhere downtown without paying for a garage spot. Hampden is easier in this regard.

I would also be aware that it wasn't that long ago (just a year ago!) that Baltimore was a sluggish real estate market. Places in Canton and Federal Hill could be very slow to sell because there's a seemingly endless supply of them. The market is hot today but I do ask myself why - it's not like there's population growth nor has a flood of higher paying jobs happened. It's hot because inventory is suddenly very tight, and the low interest rates has spurred more people into looking. Both tells me that eventually the market will normalize once the vaccines are underway so there is probably a risk in slightly overpaying for a house if you buy now. On the other hand, given that I track sales history in my real estate research, there is also a strong resistance to rapid appreciation in Baltimore regardless of a hot market. It could be that Baltimore was underpriced a year ago and today's prices are more realistic but unlikely to go up much higher.

Last edited by DXBtoFL; 01-06-2021 at 08:47 AM..
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Old 01-06-2021, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia Pa
921 posts, read 572,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
I wouldn't say locals are "down" on the waterfront neighborhoods. There's a bit of a divide. There's truth to that the waterfront neighborhoods attracts a lot of young college grads and that can come with a partying atmosphere not everyone likes. Fells is a major center for bars and nightlife, as is Federal Hill. And these grads are usually from the suburbs, move to the city for a few years, then move back out to the suburbs so their entire Baltimore experience is restricted to just the waterfront areas and they have no knowledge of the northern Baltimore neighborhoods, which is a wonderful part of town. There can be a transitional versus long term resident divide. However, there are plenty of long term residents in the waterfront areas too.

To use a Philadelphia a comparison, you get many young people moving to Queens Village, South Philadelphia, Northern Liberties and so on, who have no idea about Chestnut Hill or Mount Airy.

I wouldn't stop you from buying a cheap 200-250k rowhouse in Federal Hill or Fells Point. Just be aware they won't likely appreciate much, are at risk of potential loss in value (though I think that's unlikely going forward for various reasons). However, parking will always be a problem. If your daughter is commuting daily to Columbia or the Loyola campus in North Baltimore, she will find parking a major problem anywhere downtown without paying for a garage spot. Hampden is easier in this regard.

I would also be aware that it wasn't that long ago (just a year ago!) that Baltimore was a sluggish real estate market. Places in Canton and Federal Hill could be very slow to sell because there's a seemingly endless supply of them. The market is hot today but I do ask myself why - it's not like there's population growth nor has a flood of higher paying jobs happened. It's hot because inventory is suddenly very tight, and the low interest rates has spurred more people into looking. Both tells me that eventually the market will normalize once the vaccines are underway so there is probably a risk in slightly overpaying for a house if you buy now. On the other hand, given that I track sales history in my real estate research, there is also a strong resistance to rapid appreciation in Baltimore regardless of a hot market. It could be that Baltimore was underpriced a year ago and today's prices are more realistic but unlikely to go up much higher.
Right, this all makes sense. Thanks for the in-depth overviews DXBtoFL - very helpful. Also helps that you are obviously very familiar with Philadelphia. I guess the way I see it is that even if I overpay a bit for a house, with ridiculously low rates coupled with the fact that I won't have to pay rent for two or more years (pending on where my daughter ends up post graduation), it probably makes sense to buy vs rent. I'm really focused on the sub-200k market so the mortgage and taxes would come out quite low after putting 20% down. The rentals I'm finding start at around $1000/month and most are a bit more. That's burning at least 25k in rental right off the top when I could be building equity. My main concern, which you hit on above, is parking. I think I'm going to have to get a monthly spot for her, but I'd probably have to do the same with a rental anyway, or pay considerably more for a rental with parking (from my research). You seem bullish on the Hampden neighborhood. It looks pretty nice, but again, the prices for both purchasing and renting are a bit higher than I prefer. Anyway, thanks again and if you think of any other advice or warnings or just thoughts, please do post or PM me.
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Old 01-06-2021, 03:53 PM
 
6,884 posts, read 10,438,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
I wouldn't say locals are "down" on the waterfront neighborhoods. There's a bit of a divide. There's truth to that the waterfront neighborhoods attracts a lot of young college grads and that can come with a partying atmosphere not everyone likes. Fells is a major center for bars and nightlife, as is Federal Hill. And these grads are usually from the suburbs, move to the city for a few years, then move back out to the suburbs so their entire Baltimore experience is restricted to just the waterfront areas and they have no knowledge of the northern Baltimore neighborhoods, which is a wonderful part of town. There can be a transitional versus long term resident divide. However, there are plenty of long term residents in the waterfront areas too.

To use a Philadelphia a comparison, you get many young people moving to Queens Village, South Philadelphia, Northern Liberties and so on, who have no idea about Chestnut Hill or Mount Airy.

I wouldn't stop you from buying a cheap 200-250k rowhouse in Federal Hill or Fells Point. Just be aware they won't likely appreciate much, are at risk of potential loss in value (though I think that's unlikely going forward for various reasons). However, parking will always be a problem. If your daughter is commuting daily to Columbia or the Loyola campus in North Baltimore, she will find parking a major problem anywhere downtown without paying for a garage spot. Hampden is easier in this regard.

I would also be aware that it wasn't that long ago (just a year ago!) that Baltimore was a sluggish real estate market. Places in Canton and Federal Hill could be very slow to sell because there's a seemingly endless supply of them. The market is hot today but I do ask myself why - it's not like there's population growth nor has a flood of higher paying jobs happened. It's hot because inventory is suddenly very tight, and the low interest rates has spurred more people into looking. Both tells me that eventually the market will normalize once the vaccines are underway so there is probably a risk in slightly overpaying for a house if you buy now. On the other hand, given that I track sales history in my real estate research, there is also a strong resistance to rapid appreciation in Baltimore regardless of a hot market. It could be that Baltimore was underpriced a year ago and today's prices are more realistic but unlikely to go up much higher.


Sound Assessment
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Old 01-06-2021, 06:11 PM
 
2,343 posts, read 1,124,182 times
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200K for a rowhouse in Fells, Fed Hill, or Canton?

The market has been strong for a long time out here (Burbs)........especially new homes.
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Old 01-10-2021, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,579 posts, read 2,229,312 times
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Baltimore is really so much more than Fed Hill/Inner Harbor/HE/Fells/Canton, etc.

Some of the better/best options in my opinion are Hampden/Woodberry/Bolton Hill/Upper Charles Street around Hopkins/Guilford/Roland Pk/Mt. Vernon/Mt. Royal/Mt. Washington. And while this probably won't be what you're looking for Fallstaff - east of Park Heights Ave. has some gorgeous housing stock as well.
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Old 01-10-2021, 05:51 PM
 
2,343 posts, read 1,124,182 times
Reputation: 1250
^
Read the thread.
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