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Old 03-08-2021, 10:17 PM
 
6,505 posts, read 1,523,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
It's hard to ignore that Baltimore has been a staunchly one party town since the 1950s. The failures of Baltimore can't be wholly disconnected from the failures of the Democratic party establishment to accomplish anything meaningful in Baltimore. If you're someone who's happy to blame a national or state level Republican politician for any failures or crises, you can't suddenly turn a blind eye to the Democratic party and Baltimore.... although I suspect plenty will continue to do so.
His foolish comment isn't even worthy of a response, but you provided a good one. Thanks.
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Old 03-09-2021, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Boston
15,737 posts, read 4,767,379 times
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when you elect someone as Mayor of Baltimore who then steals gift cards meant for poor people you know you live in a third world city...
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Old 03-09-2021, 08:11 AM
 
6,952 posts, read 10,519,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Oh so... like how MA NJ CT MN all have the best schools in the nation and are Blue states? hmm

What works in MA and makes it #1
-High per student spending.
-Paying Teachers
-Making sure prop 2.5 is passed in towns. Higher Taxes to schools = more funding = better schools
-Pragmatic Leadership and great leaders like Warren represent and work for MA.

Similar reasons for NJ, etc.
I think MD has some good schools/districts as do the states that you mentioned.. Baltimore City Schools are challenged and from my understanding also heavily subsidized by the state. I would imagine there may be similar challenges in places like Camden, Newark, Bridgeport, Hartford etc in some of the states that you referenced.. Baltimore's biggest problem is the last bullet you mentioned even then.. that only goes so far because once these kids walk out the building there is a whole range of challenges that greet them and attempt to undo any positive reinforcement they may have received. There are a handful of schools and charters that are doing well in the City.. I dont know how they can replicate their success across the District.. but maybe some case studies need to happen to see what is working. Case in Point. Roland Park Elementary/Middle and Poly Western High is probably the most prized school zone in the City. It also serves the most wealthy portion of the City though many of those residents may not send their kids to these schools. They do.. however; seem to take an active role in volunteering and supporting these schools even though many of the kids that attend come from outside of these neighborhoods and maybe even from outside the zone.

It would seem that there is a strong correlation between supportive neighborhoods (surrounding the school) along with parental involvement that leads to successful outcomes in schools.. Many Baltimore neighborhoods unfortunately do not have such neighborhoods or support structures and advocacy around their schools like the Roland Park-Poly zone. Poly certainly pull kids from across the city.. but it is widely supported by the parents whose kids attend, the neighborhood, teachers and even alumni which keeps the school in good standings....
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Old 03-10-2021, 08:02 AM
 
373 posts, read 148,023 times
Reputation: 916
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Oh so... like how MA NJ CT MN all have the best schools in the nation and are Blue states? hmm

What works in MA and makes it #1
-High per student spending.
-Paying Teachers
-Making sure prop 2.5 is passed in towns. Higher Taxes to schools = more funding = better schools
-Pragmatic Leadership and great leaders like Warren represent and work for MA.

Similar reasons for NJ, etc.
Demographics are also very different, making it apples to oranges comparison, as well as cherry picking what you consider best schools.

Both Montgomery and Howard Counties in Maryland have traditionally scored very strongly in terms of school measurements and school scores and are indisputably among the "best" school districts in the nation.

Maryland and many states have differently structured school districts. MA and NJ have township/village based schools, which allows affluent suburbs to have excellent schools through both the demographics of the suburb and the high property taxes they pay. In Maryland, school districts are countywide, not by suburban town. A distinct difference. In MA or NJ, a working class town and affluent town can be side by side, in the same county, but have separate schools. In Maryland, they would be in the same county and in the same school district, receiving the same school funding and so forth. Differences within the school district would be zoned schools and those can reflect local neighborhood demographics.

I've lived in enough places to know that all cities have suburbs with excellent schools, and all cities have areas with poor schools. There are excellent schools in Florida and underperforming schools in Massachusetts. There's no magic political formula involved beyond demographics. Affluent suburbs have excellent schools, poor neighborhoods have mediocre to bad schools, and this is the case anywhere you go in the country.
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Old 03-10-2021, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
2,361 posts, read 1,694,740 times
Reputation: 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
It's hard to ignore that Baltimore has been a staunchly one party town since the 1950s. The failures of Baltimore can't be wholly disconnected from the failures of the Democratic party establishment to accomplish anything meaningful in Baltimore. If you're someone who's happy to blame a national or state level Republican politician for any failures or crises, you can't suddenly turn a blind eye to the Democratic party and Baltimore.... although I suspect plenty will continue to do so.
I detect a right-wing bias and some projecting on your part. I generally do not blame a political party on a broad scale because the world is too complex. But hey, maybe the Democrats did some major damage. I would like to know more of a specific level.

Today's Baltimore is a reflection of yesterday's Baltimore. Was it Democratic policy that constructed the social "White L" in Baltimore? How were the Baltimore Democrats able to retain its wealthy white neighborhoods in the city, but the Democrats in the mid-west cities experienced a harsh upper class white flight (Detroit, Cleveland, ect)? And is that considered a win?

You do know that although Baltimore was as racist of a city as the next, the black middle class stood strong mid-20th century. One day, blue collar corporations didn't feel like paying people livable wages anymore and went oversea's for cheap labor. Was it Democratic policies that constructed the atmosphere for business to make this decision and outsource overseas? Or was it just pure corporate greed and the desire for cheaper labor? And if a Republican were in office at that time, what would the Republican propose that would be a better deal than slave labor in the East?

Last edited by BMoreJuice; 03-10-2021 at 02:33 PM..
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Old 03-10-2021, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
2,361 posts, read 1,694,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RowingFiend View Post
His foolish comment isn't even worthy of a response, but you provided a good one. Thanks.
Buddy.

They were questions, not comments.
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Old 03-10-2021, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
2,361 posts, read 1,694,740 times
Reputation: 744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
Good Question... on the surface, if you use the GOP hallmarks and apply them on the city level you have:

1) Lower Taxes/ Less Regulation- in the city that would be good for many.. property and income taxes but in a BROKE city not sure how that plays with the Bond Rating and ability the city to pay bills and not cut the minimal services it provides..though I am sure there is plenty of waste to go around.. Lower taxes and less regulation may also help with things such as small business growth or landing corporate headquarters.. but that likely will also require incentives and ignite the welfare vs. subsidy argument

2) Fiscal Accountability/Public Administration.. may have been a hallmark of the old GOP pre 2016.. not sure about now and again we are talking locally so Baltimore /Maryland Conservatism may look liberal in a place like Mississippi. I would love for more audits and work to be done around this issue though.. we have to find out where the money is going and how well or not it is being spent and how effective.

3)Immigration- more of a national issue but I guess there is the whole sanctuary city thing. The broader question is has immigration legal or illegal benefited or hurt Baltimore.. I have heard arguments on both sides of that issue as applied to Baltimore.

4) Anti Defunding the Police...... Policing is a function of you local government and that is where the focus should be (though it has become a national debate) and rest with residents their officials and the police in that jurisdiction.. What works in Portland may not (and likely wont work) in Baltimore, and what works (or doesnt in Baltimore) may or may not work in Atlanta.. Go to your city council meeting and engage there...on the issue of reform and budget.. The only role for the Feds is on police reform side and civil rights.. FUNDING is left to the local govt and maybe the state. I know the feds do give cities money for law enforcement but is that really enough to make or break a department?

5) Tough on Crime... maybe something is to be said here.. but again arresting people and filling the jail does that work a la Omalley? Does/did three strikes work in other cities? Crime is out of control but policing seems only to a part of what is needed.

6) Culture War issues... again too many to list.....and a city like baltimore has a myriad of issues.. maybe there is better management/leadership/planning but to your point is that really a party or political thing or just good ole effective Public Administration and competency issue?

Would love to get other ideas from thoughts since this argument comes up often in this forum
These are some interesting points. I think the issues around crime and police have some merit. If memory serves correct, I thought Baltimore was offering big incentives and tax breaks for business to come to the city. The challenge here is that there is a big tax burden on the resident. The city does not have the tax base to make substantial cuts. Its a chicken and the egg scenario.

Again, I think crime is an issue, but high crime didn't stop white folks from gentrifying DC in the late 1990's. In my view, my observation is that Baltimore City has taken a playbook from DC and is waiting for gentrification to take over. Mayor Scott appears to have a different mindset, but he is not truly going to stop gentrification. There is just too much to fix in the city with no money. And those with money have there own agendas.

Other than some tit for tat policies, I don't see a Republican mayor coming in and turning Baltimore into Philly.
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Old 03-10-2021, 07:35 PM
 
6,952 posts, read 10,519,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMoreJuice View Post
These are some interesting points. I think the issues around crime and police have some merit. If memory serves correct, I thought Baltimore was offering big incentives and tax breaks for business to come to the city. The challenge here is that there is a big tax burden on the resident. The city does not have the tax base to make substantial cuts. Its a chicken and the egg scenario.

Again, I think crime is an issue, but high crime didn't stop white folks from gentrifying DC in the late 1990's. In my view, my observation is that Baltimore City has taken a playbook from DC and is waiting for gentrification to take over. Mayor Scott appears to have a different mindset, but he is not truly going to stop gentrification. There is just too much to fix in the city with no money. And those with money have there own agendas.

Other than some tit for tat policies, I don't see a Republican mayor coming in and turning Baltimore into Philly.

For the most part Gentrification is taking place in poor white neighborhoods. The only exceptions may be Greenmount East and the area around Hopkins ..I guess that is Broadway East/Mid East/ Oliver ...Even with that ...most people can just move a few blocks over if they are renting or to the other side of town. In DC they literally have to leave town and move out into PG County . I don't see Baltimore experiencing the same level though many affordable housing advocates mat disagree.

The level of appreciation and $$$ you can make getting in early in DC and the reducing your commute time so you can network at a smug DC Happy Hour outweigh the property crimes in a transitioning area...In Baltimore housing is still pretty affordable especially for those working in DC. If you work in downtown Baltimore there are plenty of options both in the city and out to still have a reasonable commute. That may only increase in a post COVID telework era...There is a new catholic school being built on the westside and charters continue to pop up..so schools choice may be getting better in some areas....but I don't see people being willing to put up with crime because the return on investment here is not like DC. Not to mention the DC folks know they is change in the near future so they soldier on through the crime issue ...In bmo they may have to be in the trenches longer and not have the patience to ride out
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Old 03-10-2021, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
2,361 posts, read 1,694,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
For the most part Gentrification is taking place in poor white neighborhoods. The only exceptions may be Greenmount East and the area around Hopkins ..I guess that is Broadway East/Mid East/ Oliver ...Even with that ...most people can just move a few blocks over if they are renting or to the other side of town. In DC they literally have to leave town and move out into PG County . I don't see Baltimore experiencing the same level though many affordable housing advocates mat disagree.

The level of appreciation and $$$ you can make getting in early in DC and the reducing your commute time so you can network at a smug DC Happy Hour outweigh the property crimes in a transitioning area...In Baltimore housing is still pretty affordable especially for those working in DC. If you work in downtown Baltimore there are plenty of options both in the city and out to still have a reasonable commute. That may only increase in a post COVID telework era...There is a new catholic school being built on the westside and charters continue to pop up..so schools choice may be getting better in some areas....but I don't see people being willing to put up with crime because the return on investment here is not like DC. Not to mention the DC folks know they is change in the near future so they soldier on through the crime issue ...In bmo they may have to be in the trenches longer and not have the patience to ride out
I don't think our previous politicians see it that way. I have seen some signs of gentrification happening over in SW, ranging from Union Square through the B&O Railroad Museum. DC and Baltimore are two different animals for sure. The challenge for DC is affordable housing. One of my co-workers just retired as a GS-15 in the government, and bought a small townhouse in the hood of SE DC. I think he paid 400k for it. 400k in Baltimore affords you a nice house in Fells/Canton, maybe even Bolton.

Affordable housing will be a breaking point for many people in the future. Not that I am a supporter by any means, but I suspect gentrification will increase in Baltimore over time.
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Old 03-11-2021, 03:41 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
31,495 posts, read 70,390,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMoreJuice View Post
Affordable housing will be a breaking point for many people in the future.
That threshold was passed years ago.

The gentrification aspect/contribution is not only inevitable it's needed.
Get past it as any sort of 'negative'
As to the displaced, just like the 17yo who can't read, that is a social work problem.
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