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Old 03-14-2022, 11:05 PM
 
389 posts, read 399,729 times
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What does it mean when you hear someone refer to a team as a small-market team?

I have read various opinions on the web, but what does it really mean to you? Does it mean a smaller fan base than others? Does it mean less viewers on the television and media platforms? Is it used in an negative context?

Does it refer to a area that has less professional teams than others? Obviously big cities like New York and Chicago have many professional teams, but even if your team doesn’t perform well, does it change what kind of market you are in?
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Old 03-15-2022, 11:17 AM
 
Location: North America
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A small-market team plays in a market that is small.

Take MLB. Teams play in metros as large as New York (20m+). 21 of the 30 franchises play in metros of 4m+, while 5 come in at fewer than 3m (Milwaukee, the smallest, barely cracks 2m).
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Old 03-19-2022, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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Just a term that sounds nicer than "low revenue generating for the league". It applies to all sports and is why the NBA was making a mess of their adult diapers when they got Phoenix v Milwaukee instead of LA v Brooklyn in the final last year.
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Old 03-20-2022, 08:30 AM
46H
 
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The Wilpons always claimed the Mets were a small market team because only 10 people live in Willets Point.
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Old 03-28-2022, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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Between 1971 and 2005 when DC didn't have a team, Baltimore wasn't considered a small market team. Sellouts were common in Memorial Stadium (and later Camden Yards) during this stretch when the O's were contenders, and this was with a larger stadium capacity as well. Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Cleveland, San Diego, Tampa Bay, and Kansas City are the other commonly accepted "small market" MLB teams. They are all by no means small cities (They're all top 40 ADI's), but they definitely lack the big hustle/bustle of the big market metros with a wealth of corporate sponsors. It's easier to get a ticket, often for less money unless if a nearby major market team comes into town, but it usually comes at the expense of being less successful.

Of course, small is relative as when you go to the next level down (AAA), you'll find cities like Nashville, Columbus, Las Vegas, Charlotte, New Orleans, Austin (Round Rock), Indianapolis, and Buffalo are considered major market for that division, whereas Syracuse, Reno, Rochester, Fresno, Colorado Springs, Albuquerque, Norfolk, and Scranton would be the small market AAA clubs. You'll find that the larger AAA markets have first-tier teams in other leagues, and in many cases, multiple. That said, the biggest markets in that level are not much different from the smallest MLB markets at this point. "Large market" in AAA means generally means over 1.5 million in the MSA with a hinterland reaching over 3 million.
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Old 03-28-2022, 06:20 AM
 
448 posts, read 251,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 46h View Post
the wilpons always claimed the mets were a small market team because only 10 people live in willets point.
lol!
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Old 03-28-2022, 05:07 PM
 
448 posts, read 251,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
when you go to the next level down (AAA), you'll find cities like Nashville, Columbus, Las Vegas, Charlotte, New Orleans, Austin (Round Rock), Indianapolis, and Buffalo are considered major market for that division, whereas Syracuse, Reno, Rochester, Fresno, Colorado Springs, Albuquerque, Norfolk, and Scranton would be the small market AAA clubs.
What about Lehigh Valley?
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Old 03-29-2022, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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I'd consider that small market for AAA like Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
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Old 05-14-2022, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
3,446 posts, read 3,374,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timfromtenn View Post
Generally low revenue. The A's are in a top 10 media market but called "small market" while the Cardinals are in a truly small market but are consistently a top draw.

It comes down to spending power, San Diego has been supporting the Padres really well since the Chargers left, and is the only US market with MLB but not the NFL now except St. Louis. Meanwhile, small markets like Pittsburgh, Cleveland, and Baltimore struggle at the gate for MLB but are strong NFL cities. Then of course there are the Angels. They tried to expand their market by being the only team in pro sports that has no geographic name on any part of the uniform or team merch.
What the Angels did by calling themselves the California Angels(and later the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim), isn't the first time a team changed their name slightly for marketing reasons. The Phoenix Cardinals of the NFL changed their name to the Arizona Cardinals(and yes, they were THAT same team that once played in Saint Louis, and at 'old Comiskey' along with the White Sox back when they were in Chicago), Texas Rangers(when they really play in Arlington, TX), list goes on.

As for Oakland, they are considered small market since they don't spend as much as other MLB teams. I think it'd also greatly help them, if they finally got out of that flooded(as numerous flooding incidents of dugouts, have been reported there) and aging dump, known as the Coliseum. I'm not surprised the Raiders' second run of playing at the Coliseum, ended a few years back. Where even that ugly added 'Mount Davis' seating area, couldn't keep the Raiders from one day moving out of there for a second(and I think now, for good) time.
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Old 05-17-2022, 06:48 AM
 
5,743 posts, read 3,600,617 times
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My guess, it is measured by the amount of ad revenue that can be generated by local TV coverage..
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