U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Hawaii > Big Island
 [Register]
Big Island The Island of Hawaii
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-18-2011, 05:23 PM
 
820 posts, read 2,917,913 times
Reputation: 646

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffington View Post
That sounds like a good investment. Is that the produxct made by Panasonic or Toshiba or some other Japan-based company. I hear it advertised here, I think.
Ours are Fujitsu. and we have no complaints.

If resources aren't an issue, you can bring in whichever brand you may find you prefer from your research. We went with the ones that the local installers were familiar with, as we didn't think we'd need to go to any extra expense to do anything else.

Do get multiple quotes, our tri-unit was much less expensive (in comparison overall) than the first installation of the dual-unit.

As with anything you have done with building your house, I highly advise you to be there and oversee all work done. We had a great contractor for initial fix & remodel, and he took care of making sure all was done well while we weren't yet on island. But subsequent work done by others hasn't always been up to par, nor was everyone informed about specs of what they were installing. Adding ridgeline roof vents was one example of that. We knew more about the specs than the installer.

You are proven yourself as willing to speak up and get what you want. Don't want to burn bridges on an island, but be firm in what you expect. Then check it during and after.

Some of the things we learned are easiest done while in construction mode, such as insulating interior walls. Sure you can do them later, but much easier while everything is open, and you don't risk affecting installed wiring.

We also recommend:
- Overwire your house with net cable, better quality. That is, yes put it in your office, but if the walls are open and you have the cash, might as well wire the other rooms and add ports there. Never know when you want to add some electronics in another room.

- You may not be carpeting (we did and regret it), but if you are, then add your audio cable under the carpet. Or build in channels to your floor moldings.

- As noted, forget wall to wall carpet. Way too much red dirt, we should have stuck with tile or hardwood and used area carpets. Easier to clean, area carpets easier to change. We put in a commercial carpet so the wear has been minimal compared to residential, but it is still soiled and a pain in the rear.

- Adding an overhang to shade the kitchen sliding door dropped our kitchen temperature by 15 degrees. Shade your sliders and windows. Tint the glass if you like.

- Our hot water tank is outside. It wasn't enclosed when we bought the house, but it is now. Best thing due to corrosion. We had the builder make the enclosure with doors large enough to get in there and service the tank, or pull it out if necessary. He thought we were crazy, but really what would we do when we need service, tear down the walls? You have to think ahead with construction.

- Map out your irrigation! We wish we had a plan of where all the pipes & connectors got located, but we didn't. Saves you some digging later.

- Everything green grows fast and big. Keep plantings away from the house to avoid crawlies using a plant as ladder to your roof - then attic - then you.

- Use more rebar in any rock walls than your local wall builder might think you need. No, we didn't need it for drainage, but darned if the plant roots and trunks aren't cracking the big expensive wall.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-18-2011, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Naperville, IL
44 posts, read 92,946 times
Reputation: 119
Having owned 'stucco' homes in NJ, IL, & TX, I'll chime in. Living in CA, you may already know much of what I know, but I'll err on the safe side.

There is a huge difference between the lower-end 'stuff' and the higher-end, 'real' stucco.

The 'bad' stucco attempts to prevent any moisture from ever entering: it doesn't work. It WILL give you mold eventually.

The 'good' (& more expensive) stucco allows water to 'drain' away should it enter.

Proper stucco installation requires expansion joints. Without them, you will get ugly (cosmetic) cracks the minute the ground beneath your home moves. Unfortunately, not all local building codes require such joints. Using an elastomeric paint (a paint that 'stretches') will help hide any 'spider' cracks should they develop. With a good, trustworthy, experienced installation crew, 'real' stucco is a great choice. However, I'd avoid getting stucco if the installation crew is anything less than stellar.

Some other quick thoughts:
(1) I was under the impression that HI required solar water heating in all new residential construction in state.

(2) In your home design, I recommend the use of radiant barrier materials; you can even use a multi-layer RB product as a 'house wrap' to further reduce your HVAC needs. Likewise, I have a preference for metal/tile roofing over the lower (initial) cost asphalt shingles -- asphalt shingles are giant heat sinks that re-radiate the sun's heat into your home.

(3) Give consideration in your design to using 'natural airflows' to additionally lower your HVAC needs. The specific micro-climate of your lot can alter what does & does not 'work'.

(4) One house we built in the Midwest just over a decade ago had a very, very large, deep-pour basement with a 'walkout' on one side. It was a blast. Thanks to a wise use of steel & wood trusses, we created long 'spans' between walls & support beams that allowed my kids to have enough room for 2 hockey goals allowing them to play indoor hockey on their roller blades. Too bad a job change required a 900-mile relocation. We still miss that house.

Good luck.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2011, 12:56 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
11,023 posts, read 22,309,267 times
Reputation: 10777
Hawaii houses usually have huge eave overhangs to shade the sides of the house and keep them cooler. If your roof is white colored it will be a lot cooler than a dark colored roof and I think you can get some tax credits for a white colored roof.

Having windows situated so the breezes can blow through a room is desirable. Also cathedral or open beam ceilings so the heat has a place to go where the people aren't. A nine foot ceiling is more comfortable in a tropical climate than an eight foot ceiling. If you are on the dry side of the island, then you can insulate and house wrap your house without too many mildew problems, but if you are on the wet side, too much insulation and house wrap can let mildew proliferate. If you are at a higher elevation, then there won't be as much heat to deal with and construction changes a bit.

There is no natural gas available in Hawaii. The gas company charges about $7 a month for you to rent their tank and they charge about $1 more per gallon to deliver the gas to the tank. Most folks take their propane tanks to get them filled up, there are many places throughout the island which will fill propane tanks. There is a handy "switch over valve" which can be installed which will automatically switch from the empty tank to the full one so your pilot lights never go out. Propane is pretty expensive, but electricity is worse. Best for economical reasons is solar hot water with a propane backup or propane "on demand" type water heater.

"Standard" house construction (for a one story house) is a choice of either poured concrete slab or post and pier foundation. If slab, add anchor bolts and go straight to framing the walls, if post and pier, then 4" x 4" posts braced 2,3 or 4 ways and appropriate sized beams and floor joists @ 16" o.c. 3/4" T & G plywood subfloor. Then 2" x 4" @ 16" o.c. stud walls with min. 5/8" T1-11 at the exterior and 1/2" drywall at the interior. Then a choice of either truss or roof rafters with metal strapping at 6' o.c. on diagonals and 2" x 4" purlins @ 24" o.c. and min. 26 gauge prepainted metal roofing. Usually, either 1/2" drywall or 1" x 6" T & G pine ceilings. There's Simpson fittings about every four feet going from the foundation, up the walls and across the roof for hurricane resistance. The County Building Department has all this on their website.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2011, 10:07 AM
 
1,811 posts, read 1,134,782 times
Reputation: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Hawaii houses usually have huge eave overhangs to shade the sides of the house and keep them cooler. If your roof is white colored it will be a lot cooler than a dark colored roof and I think you can get some tax credits for a white colored roof.

Having windows situated so the breezes can blow through a room is desirable. Also cathedral or open beam ceilings so the heat has a place to go where the people aren't. A nine foot ceiling is more comfortable in a tropical climate than an eight foot ceiling. If you are on the dry side of the island, then you can insulate and house wrap your house without too many mildew problems, but if you are on the wet side, too much insulation and house wrap can let mildew proliferate. If you are at a higher elevation, then there won't be as much heat to deal with and construction changes a bit.

There is no natural gas available in Hawaii. The gas company charges about $7 a month for you to rent their tank and they charge about $1 more per gallon to deliver the gas to the tank. Most folks take their propane tanks to get them filled up, there are many places throughout the island which will fill propane tanks. There is a handy "switch over valve" which can be installed which will automatically switch from the empty tank to the full one so your pilot lights never go out. Propane is pretty expensive, but electricity is worse. Best for economical reasons is solar hot water with a propane backup or propane "on demand" type water heater.

"Standard" house construction (for a one story house) is a choice of either poured concrete slab or post and pier foundation. If slab, add anchor bolts and go straight to framing the walls, if post and pier, then 4" x 4" posts braced 2,3 or 4 ways and appropriate sized beams and floor joists @ 16" o.c. 3/4" T & G plywood subfloor. Then 2" x 4" @ 16" o.c. stud walls with min. 5/8" T1-11 at the exterior and 1/2" drywall at the interior. Then a choice of either truss or roof rafters with metal strapping at 6' o.c. on diagonals and 2" x 4" purlins @ 24" o.c. and min. 26 gauge prepainted metal roofing. Usually, either 1/2" drywall or 1" x 6" T & G pine ceilings. There's Simpson fittings about every four feet going from the foundation, up the walls and across the roof for hurricane resistance. The County Building Department has all this on their website.
I am amazed and most thankful for all the great posts and info conveyed by all posters.

However, when you say "house wrap" are you referring to the Tyvek I see on new construction? There was not such a product back in the late 70's when I was building. I'll bing it and get more info, if that is what you are referring to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Hawaii houses usually have huge eave overhangs to shade the sides of the house and keep them cooler. If your roof is white colored it will be a lot cooler than a dark colored roof and I think you can get some tax credits for a white colored roof.

Having windows situated so the breezes can blow through a room is desirable. Also cathedral or open beam ceilings so the heat has a place to go where the people aren't. A nine foot ceiling is more comfortable in a tropical climate than an eight foot ceiling. If you are on the dry side of the island, then you can insulate and house wrap your house without too many mildew problems, but if you are on the wet side, too much insulation and house wrap can let mildew proliferate. If you are at a higher elevation, then there won't be as much heat to deal with and construction changes a bit.

There is no natural gas available in Hawaii. The gas company charges about $7 a month for you to rent their tank and they charge about $1 more per gallon to deliver the gas to the tank. Most folks take their propane tanks to get them filled up, there are many places throughout the island which will fill propane tanks. There is a handy "switch over valve" which can be installed which will automatically switch from the empty tank to the full one so your pilot lights never go out. Propane is pretty expensive, but electricity is worse. Best for economical reasons is solar hot water with a propane backup or propane "on demand" type water heater.

"Standard" house construction (for a one story house) is a choice of either poured concrete slab or post and pier foundation. If slab, add anchor bolts and go straight to framing the walls, if post and pier, then 4" x 4" posts braced 2,3 or 4 ways and appropriate sized beams and floor joists @ 16" o.c. 3/4" T & G plywood subfloor. Then 2" x 4" @ 16" o.c. stud walls with min. 5/8" T1-11 at the exterior and 1/2" drywall at the interior. Then a choice of either truss or roof rafters with metal strapping at 6' o.c. on diagonals and 2" x 4" purlins @ 24" o.c. and min. 26 gauge prepainted metal roofing. Usually, either 1/2" drywall or 1" x 6" T & G pine ceilings. There's Simpson fittings about every four feet going from the foundation, up the walls and across the roof for hurricane resistance. The County Building Department has all this on their website.
How does the T1-11 hold up in HI (Waimea, dry side).

Last edited by Marka; 05-23-2011 at 03:43 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2011, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
11,023 posts, read 22,309,267 times
Reputation: 10777
Dry side Waimea T1-11 does fine, it's the standard exterior siding for probably well over 80% of residential construction on the island. In the past few years many of them have taken to getting the type of T1-11 without the vertical grooves and putting wood battens on it to simulate the old style board and batten houses. Should you choose to do this, I might suggest placing the battens at 1' o.c. and getting very thin battens. That is, if the look is to be close to the original board and batten style. They never build board and batten houses out of sixteen inch wide boards.

Yeah, Tyvek is the house wrap folks have been using. I'm still not sure if it is a good idea or not. For a humid Hilo location, I'd say not. Perhaps on the dry side it might have it's uses. Personally, the only Tyvek I've used has been to repair cuckoo clock bellows. It works just dandy for that.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2011, 10:47 AM
 
1,811 posts, read 1,134,782 times
Reputation: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Dry side Waimea T1-11 does fine, it's the standard exterior siding for probably well over 80% of residential construction on the island. In the past few years many of them have taken to getting the type of T1-11 without the vertical grooves and putting wood battens on it to simulate the old style board and batten houses. Should you choose to do this, I might suggest placing the battens at 1' o.c. and getting very thin battens. That is, if the look is to be close to the original board and batten style. They never build board and batten houses out of sixteen inch wide boards.

Yeah, Tyvek is the house wrap folks have been using. I'm still not sure if it is a good idea or not. For a humid Hilo location, I'd say not. Perhaps on the dry side it might have it's uses. Personally, the only Tyvek I've used has been to repair cuckoo clock bellows. It works just dandy for that.
Since I asked in the earlier post, I did some research on it. It didn't exist back when I was in the biz, but I have seen it used around here. My first experience with was used in mailing envelopes. It is tough stuff indeed.

Personally, my favorite siding is T1-11. It has a nice look and nails easily (I used to hate trying to pound some dull, hot-dipped 8p nail into the hard stuff). However, if just looks like termite food. I used it a few years ago to side some sheds here at the house, and it seems to be doing well. I'll have to give it an extensive examination to see how it has held up.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2011, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
11,023 posts, read 22,309,267 times
Reputation: 10777
Oh, fasteners should all be galvanized or better, otherwise they just rust away. Occasionally there are mainland carpenters who want to use "green sinkers" and those rust and make stains through the paint for awhile before they completely melt away.

The only problem I've seen with T1-11 was rot when someone forgot to put the tarpaper between the concrete and the wall. Termites seem to prefer the studs to the siding, although I'm not sure why. If rust were handled somehow, metal studs might be an answer to termite feeding. I haven't seen much metal studs used, though.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2011, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Naperville, IL
44 posts, read 92,946 times
Reputation: 119
If -- I repeat if -- a house wrap makes sense for your house, then consider the multi-layer product (TCM6) at this website -- radiant barrier attic insulation. I think the link has a picture of a house wrapped in TCM6. It looks like a giant thermos bottle. Sorry to sound like a salesman. I have simply used a similar product with success in TX. (FYI: The multi-layer aspect is important for it to work as a 'house wrap'.)

Since the primary purpose of a house wrap is, as I recall, to keep moisture out, anywhere Tyvek makes sense then so does the above (more expensive) radiant barrier product. However, as others have stated, any type of house wrap might be a bad idea on some parts of the island. (I've never built a home in a place as warm & wet as, say, Hilo. So, I defer to the experiences & expertise of others on this board.)

For a home in Tucson, Phoenix, San Antonio, or even Dallas, using the above product makes sense. On the BI with its overall more moderate temperatures, the micro-climate of your lot will will determine the issue.

When electricity rates are 'high' like on the BI, payback times on products like TCM6 collapse. So, the micro-climate of a low elevation, sunny, dry-side lot might make this product attractive. For a lot 3,000 feet up, this product is likely a waste of funds.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2011, 11:28 AM
 
129 posts, read 365,739 times
Reputation: 231
1. Stucco is almost unknown in windward Hawaii (Hilo side), because it doesn't like to be damp. Moss, mold, and mildew problems are guaranteed, and it'd probably dissolve. You might be able to get away with it in a really dry area, such as between Waimea and Kona side. You never see brick construction in Hawaii, either. Various reasons, but think about earthquakes when you think of any kind of masonry construction.

2. Steel is going to be the same as it is on the mainland. Steel buildings are common in industrial and agricultural areas, but they could very well be banned in certain subdivisions.

3. Gas has to be delivered, or you can use a portable tank and fill it in town. There's no gas pipline. Hey, there's no water and sewer some places.

4. No idea.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
11,023 posts, read 22,309,267 times
Reputation: 10777
Hmm, the lack of brick construction also might be because most bricks are imported. They make some concrete blocks in Hilo at Glover's, but nobody makes red brick or kiln type bricks in the islands that I know of. Although a lot of folks want the old kiln bricks that were in the sugar mills to make walkways out of or backyard barbeques with. There is also probably a lack of skilled masons to build the brick buildings, too, so not only the material but the craftspeople would have to be imported. I suppose if there were a demand for them, then both would be imported but since nobody really builds much with brick, folks just don't choose brick very often. Partly for whatever reasons some folks don't build with brick and partly because other folks don't build with brick.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Hawaii > Big Island
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top