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Old 07-21-2012, 11:06 AM
 
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I am talking about emotional smart. You heard stories about dogs not eating, depressed, etc. after the death of its owner. Are there any cases like that with parrots?
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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Absolutely they can be just as prone. I had adopted a few birds who lost their owners over the years. A typical response is severe feather plucking or self mutilation. Sad but true.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
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Old 07-21-2012, 06:01 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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id say in terms of emotiaonl need parrots are MORE tuned than dogs...parrots dont adapt neer as easily to "new" situations...a dog who looses their owner is going to mourn, but eventualy with time and patients they will recover....
however many parrots never do recover the passing of a long term owner...birds will worry/depress themselves to DEATH, ect...
i think a parrots inteligence is completly different to that of a dog or cat...they are more like having a toddler than a pet.
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Old 07-21-2012, 10:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
i think a parrots inteligence is completly different to that of a dog or cat...they are more like having a toddler than a pet.
What do you mean by that?
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Old 07-23-2012, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Not where I want to be
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
id say in terms of emotiaonl need parrots are MORE tuned than dogs...parrots dont adapt neer as easily to "new" situations...a dog who looses their owner is going to mourn, but eventualy with time and patients they will recover....
however many parrots never do recover the passing of a long term owner...birds will worry/depress themselves to DEATH, ect...
i think a parrots inteligence is completly different to that of a dog or cat...they are more like having a toddler than a pet.
I totally agree with you foxy. I call my Senegal my "perpetual two- year old".
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:18 PM
 
Location: MA
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Yes!!! Definately!!

As a matter of fact, when I yell "NO" at my Senegal Parrot she gets mad, poops instantly, and then turns around and stares at it as if to say "That is what I think of you yelling at me"

Another story I have is that my one parrakeets mate died three years ago, the bird stopped tweeting, didn't eat as much, and started plucking feathers for a good month or so. There was another bird in the cage, but it wasn't "his" mate. They definately do have an emotional capacity.
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bluemonday View Post
Another story I have is that my one parrakeets mate died three years ago, the bird stopped tweeting, didn't eat as much, and started plucking feathers for a good month or so. There was another bird in the cage, but it wasn't "his" mate. They definately do have an emotional capacity.
Toward humans, like dogs do. Not toward another bird.
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: MA
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Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
Toward humans, like dogs do. Not toward another bird.
Well, when I do go on business trips, she starts getting very upset and plucking her feathers....does that count?
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Old 07-23-2012, 07:27 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
What do you mean by that?
its realy difficult to explain unless youve been owned by a parrot...

i thing parrots are more "human" than dogs or cats in their emotions...

with a dog if you forget to give him a cookie...he gets over it...
with a parrot, hell tell you you forgot, an then hell DEMAND you fix the situation and if you dont, he WILL get angry!

A parrot KNOWS what it wants, and doesnt understand why WE as humans just arnt listening!

for example...my macaw jack jack...he got mad at me last night because i refused to give him a peice of my toast...now my dogs would stare at me and drool and when told "your not having any" eventually get bored and move on...
my cats would stare at me and glare, and when told your not having any, give "the look" and move on...
but my macaw TELLS me he wants it, and if i dont give it him he tells me off, and if i still dont give it to me he throws a temper tantrum, gets nippy and screamy and generally has to be put in a time out untill he remembers that im the one with opposable thumbs!

its just a different type of emotion, and communication....
a dog is like having a dog, it has needs and wants and desires, but accepts you as the human are incharge of that resource
a parrot however is like having a feathery human...they dont understand why your in charge of the resource, if they want it they want it now and if you dont give it to them there going to have a tantrum.
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Old 07-23-2012, 07:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
its realy difficult to explain unless youve been owned by a parrot...

.
Is that only applicable to big parrots like Macaw and Amazons only? What about smaller parrots like conures, cockatiels, and quaker parrots?
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