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Old 07-23-2012, 01:48 PM
 
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I love my dusky conure to pieces and he can be very cute and sweet. This month, he just turned one years old. We both watch TV at night. If not moving around playing, he'll be down along side of the sofa, but sometimes, he'll stop what he's doing, stares at me, climbs up my chest really fast, then starts attacking me, biting my face, lips, ears or whatever he can get hold of. Sometimes it's really hard, others not, but sometimes I have to grab his beak and pry it so that he can let go. Other times, without cause he'll be sitting along side of me on the sofa, when all I'll feel is a nip on the skin of my arm or elbow that hurts. If I tell him "no!" and distract him, sometimes he listens, but other times the "no" just makes him more aggressive. At times, all I can do is laugh at his insanity, which seems to make him worse. The attacks aren't anything I can't control, but not too often I just have to give him a time out and put him back in his cage. I'm interested in knowing what causes this reaction from him. I'd like for him to be nice and make him be more gentle. Thank you. ~Ella
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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This is typical for parrots when they become sexually mature. Essentially the Dusky is trying to establish his/her dominance. This is perfectly normal, albeit annoying.
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:32 PM
 
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Keep in mind that parrots are not domesticated animals like dogs and cats, and they retain their wild instincts and behavior drives. If you have a chance to observe a flock of wild conures sometime, you'll see that they are often jostling and nipping at each other. Sounds like returning him to his cage when he gets like that is a good idea.
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by legal_eagle View Post
Keep in mind that parrots are not domesticated animals like dogs and cats, and they retain their wild instincts and behavior drives. If you have a chance to observe a flock of wild conures sometime, you'll see that they are often jostling and nipping at each other. Sounds like returning him to his cage when he gets like that is a good idea.
Thank you, you two, for putting my mind at ease. I'm glad to learn of this. At one time, a person on another board, told me that I was probably provoking my dusky conure's agressive behavior, because when I held him, I'd tell him that I loved him. She told me that he had probably taken me on as his sexual pardon and that I should try to dissuade his behavior, only the person who told me this, didn't tell me what to do to dissuade this behavior. It made me feel guilty. Thanx again!
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Old 07-24-2012, 02:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by perfidia View Post
Thank you, you two, for putting my mind at ease. I'm glad to learn of this. At one time, a person on another board, told me that I was probably provoking my dusky conure's agressive behavior, because when I held him, I'd tell him that I loved him. She told me that he had probably taken me on as his sexual pardon and that I should try to dissuade his behavior, only the person who told me this, didn't tell me what to do to dissuade this behavior. It made me feel guilty. Thanx again!
One of the things I like about parrots is that they have that unpredictable and somewhat feisty side to them. If you enjoy that about them and go with it, they are very fun to be around!
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Old 07-24-2012, 06:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by legal_eagle View Post
One of the things I like about parrots is that they have that unpredictable and somewhat feisty side to them. If you enjoy that about them and go with it, they are very fun to be around!
Yes, I do enjoy this about them, but my fingers are sore and thinking something very different. I really don't care, however, cause I love my dusky to pieces! I'm just glad his beak isn't any bigger!
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Old 07-27-2012, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Not where I want to be
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Originally Posted by perfidia View Post
Yes, I do enjoy this about them, but my fingers are sore and thinking something very different. I really don't care, however, cause I love my dusky to pieces! I'm just glad his beak isn't any bigger!
Oh you and me both, perfidia! My little Senegal has the jaw strength of a BIG macaw and he has hurt me so much at times! I don't even want to imagine the damage he could do with a bigger beak! My little guy has been cage bound for 7 1/2 months now since Daddy died. I've had to rearrange him twice since Daddy's hospital bed came and went, so he's in front of the picture window now and seems to be content to a point with me just giving him head scratches. He's always looking out the window now and not totally concentrated on Mommy.

That person who said it was because you tell your Dusky "I love you" is so full of you know what! A bird has no idea what "love" is in human terms. Yes, you probably ARE your Dusky's "mate" in his/her mind. I know I am my Senegal's "mate" and maybe that accounts for some of the attacks. They don't understand how a natural nip can cause so much pain for us. I use the word "Gentle" and he/she does tone it down a bit but the initial nip is never gentle.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tamiznluv View Post
Oh you and me both, perfidia! My little Senegal has the jaw strength of a BIG macaw and he has hurt me so much at times! I don't even want to imagine the damage he could do with a bigger beak! My little guy has been cage bound for 7 1/2 months now since Daddy died. I've had to rearrange him twice since Daddy's hospital bed came and went, so he's in front of the picture window now and seems to be content to a point with me just giving him head scratches. He's always looking out the window now and not totally concentrated on Mommy.

That person who said it was because you tell your Dusky "I love you" is so full of you know what! A bird has no idea what "love" is in human terms. Yes, you probably ARE your Dusky's "mate" in his/her mind. I know I am my Senegal's "mate" and maybe that accounts for some of the attacks. They don't understand how a natural nip can cause so much pain for us. I use the word "Gentle" and he/she does tone it down a bit but the initial nip is never gentle.
Hi tami....I'm so sorry to hear that your daddy died. You have my deep condolences, but I'm glad that you still have your senegal parrot. That's one parrot that I have always admired. I love the way they always look so well groomed! Also, what that other person on the other board said to me was that I was probably causing this kind of behavior because I was probably petting my conure on its back and that was probably causing the regurgitation and the aggressive reaction from it. Thank you for your reply. Take care.
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Not where I want to be
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Originally Posted by perfidia View Post
Hi tami....I'm so sorry to hear that your daddy died. You have my deep condolences, but I'm glad that you still have your senegal parrot. That's one parrot that I have always admired. I love the way they always look so well groomed! Also, what that other person on the other board said to me was that I was probably causing this kind of behavior because I was probably petting my conure on its back and that was probably causing the regurgitation and the aggressive reaction from it. Thank you for your reply. Take care.
Hi, perfidia. "Daddy" was my husband, not my daddy. He was Two Bee's "Daddy". That other board person is right. Stroking the back gets birds excited, hence the regurgitation and agression. Poor babies don't realize we humans can not take thier natural "love".
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