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Old 03-14-2014, 07:55 PM
 
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There are tons of albino cockatiels, budgies, lovebirds, etc., but no conures.
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Old 03-16-2014, 12:25 AM
 
Location: so cal
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I am noticing a pattern in the OP's posts
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Old 03-16-2014, 07:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dober1 View Post
I am noticing a pattern in the OP's posts
What you mean?
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Old 03-16-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: so cal
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Look at the titles to your most recent posts. Just an observation not necessarily negative.
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Old 03-16-2014, 07:44 PM
 
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I post a question in the subject of a thread?
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Old 03-26-2014, 01:39 AM
 
Location: McKinleyville, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quaker15 View Post
There are tons of albino cockatiels, budgies, lovebirds, etc., but no conures.
Budgerigars, cockatiels and lovebirds breed very easy and proficiently, that opens them up to mutations that conures are not open to. In the wild budgerigars and cockatiels group in flocks in the thousands and up and have large migratory paths. Most conures live in smaller groups and in jungle environments.
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Old 03-28-2014, 03:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TheDragonslayer View Post
Budgerigars, cockatiels and lovebirds breed very easy and proficiently, that opens them up to mutations that conures are not open to. In the wild budgerigars and cockatiels group in flocks in the thousands and up and have large migratory paths. Most conures live in smaller groups and in jungle environments.
What you're saying is that the lack of mutation is due to lack of numbers in general?
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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well firstly we must address that technically theres no albino gene in most parrot species.
the pure white cockateils are actually the combination o the LUTINO and the WHITEFACE gene creating an "albino lookalike" that's not genetically a true albino
similar can be sed for the pure white budgie, its actually not a true albino gene but what the LUTINO gene does to the blue series

Lutino on a green based bird gives you YELLOW
Lutino on a BLUE based bird gives you WHITE

the lutino gene is why there are no white conures...because there are no truly BLUE ones...
there are eforst being concentrated particularly in the greencheeks for the blue mutations (turquoise) and the blue crown technically maintains a blue gene...but for the most part conures are green based...
so in order to get White (albino) conures you first have to find 2 conures carrying the blue gene...breed them until you get a genetically blue chick, you then need to introduce the lutino gene, so eventually youll have 2 birds that are blue or carrying blue and are lutino or carrying lutino, breed them together and if the genese line up just right you get a chick with the BLUE and LUTINO genes dominant and thus an "albino" baby.

since as of right now the blue gene is hard enough to find in conures...its hiughly unlikely well be seeing any white ones any time in the neer future...and if we do itll likely be in the greencheek first.
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Old 03-29-2014, 11:31 PM
 
Location: so cal
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Well said Foxy
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