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Old 06-23-2017, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Southern Quebec
1,434 posts, read 1,151,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enigma777 View Post
I wouldn't. I have a friend who's lovebird was eaten by a snake in a cage on a screened in porch. The snake couldn't fit through the bars of the cage afterward--it was still there.
That's so awful.

It would break my heart if anything happened to my lovebird, Mr. Turkle.
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Old 06-26-2017, 12:24 PM
 
Location: on the wind
12,920 posts, read 6,444,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
Of course my bird's are in a cage and I'm just thinking if they would like to be outdoors for a change.

Thanks.
Even if you happen to have a porch that is safe from the hazards people mentioned, be careful.....birds need to acclimate to the outdoors gradually, not just taken out on a whim. Indoor birds might not have the insulation layer (body fat, better plumage with a good oil coating, overall health) outdoor aviary birds develop. The change may panic some birds too if they happen to see something strange and frightening.

My Dad decided to set two caged budgies outdoors one sunny day. I happened to be visiting at the time, but not home when he decided to do this. When I got home in late afternoon I immediately brought the birds indoors but it was too late. One was already dead and the other died that night. No predators present, just weather, wind, temp changes, or a combination of fear and exposure. The birds had never been outdoors in all the years my parents had them. Why on earth he decided this would be a good thing I'll never know.

Last edited by Parnassia; 06-26-2017 at 12:39 PM..
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Old 06-17-2018, 04:58 PM
 
2,213 posts, read 947,563 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesg View Post
I did with mine, on a 7th floor apartment porch, important to keep them out of direct strong sunlight and not leave them unattended. Parakeets are susceptible to drafts but can tolerate cold temps.
If its breezy cover half the cage with a towel to make a wind shield.
They live outside in the wild doh.
Used to see them in flocks when I lived in Sarasota FL.
I'm considering birds, what do you mean by "susceptible to drafts?"

I heard they like to be by open windows?
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Old 06-17-2018, 05:09 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creamer1 View Post
I'm considering birds, what do you mean by "susceptible to drafts?"

I heard they like to be by open windows?
Indoor birds can become chilled if they are exposed to new or unusual drafts. Their feather insulation works best if the air is still around it. Think how much colder a breezy winter day is compared to one with no wind. Indoor birds can tolerate fairly chilly temperatures as long as the air isn't constantly pulling the tiny layer of body heat off the surface of their feathers. A healthy bird that is acclimated to an outdoor aviary setting can handle drafts within reason because it has more fat, thicker down, and probably more oil weatherproofing. What you "heard" about an open window makes no sense. A bird might enjoy being near a window for the light and the view, but not necessarily an open one.
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Old 06-17-2018, 05:14 PM
 
Location: NY
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It's no different than letting a dog off the leash.
You never know what comes next.
Be a responsible pet owner.
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Old 07-22-2018, 04:35 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme Mann View Post
Why not? They are BIRDS! I take our cockatiel out on the front porch all the time as long as it's above 22c 75F. She is in her cage and I throw a screen mesh over the cage just in case there are any mosquitoes. She loves it, we sit out there all afternoon.
Did you even read this thread? Being birds isn't the issue. If your birds are acclimated to those conditions, used to it, and out of a roaring wind they may be fine. If they are NOT acclimated or used to those conditions you are taking a risk. Up to you.
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Old 07-24-2018, 02:24 AM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme Mann View Post
Do you have any actual expertise in this or do you just make this up?
I think I do. I've kept various types of companion and aviary birds for the last 35 years. I also have degrees in ornithology and wildlife biology. If you had read my earlier post in this thread I described what happened to my father's budgies after he decided out of the blue to leave their cage outdoors for the day...these birds had NEVER been outdoors before. The point I was trying to make about acclimatization. Both birds were dead by the next morning; combination of pneumonia and stress.
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Old 07-24-2018, 08:38 AM
 
20,334 posts, read 7,942,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
I think I do. I've kept various types of companion and aviary birds for the last 35 years. I also have degrees in ornithology and wildlife biology. If you had read my earlier post in this thread I described what happened to my father's budgies after he decided out of the blue to leave their cage outdoors for the day...these birds had NEVER been outdoors before. The point I was trying to make about acclimatization. Both birds were dead by the next morning; combination of pneumonia and stress.
It seems unbelievable that two healthy birds could contract pneumonia and both die from it in one day.

Who necropsies a parakeet anyway? Who said the birds died from pneumonia and stress?

Who knows what happened to those birds. Some sort of insect bites? Pesticide?

We've always put our caged birds (cockatiels, monk parakeet and budgies) outside in beautiful weather while we kept a loose eye on the cage. Because really, something COULD happen if you aren't there - a cat could come by and knock the cage off, an owl could terrify the bird, a snake could get in there, etc.
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Old 07-24-2018, 08:38 AM
 
8,194 posts, read 2,026,062 times
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I'm no bird expert but I knew a couple who had a parakeet and would put his cage outside under a tree quite often in nice weather. One day they did so and left him on the porch in the sun. He died. I think he just got too hot. Poor fella.
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Old 07-25-2018, 02:02 AM
 
Location: on the wind
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It seems unbelievable that two healthy birds could contract pneumonia and both die from it in one day.

Who necropsies a parakeet anyway? Who said the birds died from pneumonia and stress?

Who knows what happened to those birds. Some sort of insect bites? Pesticide?


Well, with such a small bird's fast metabolism something like that could overwhelm it that fast especially if it was secondary to some low grade infection the bird already had. I'm not sure what else would have created symptoms of wet and increasingly blocked nares, mouth full of mucus, rapid wheezing, clicking, and gasping, lethargy, increasing weakness and death. We actually did take one of the birds in for necropsy as my dad was distraught and couldn't understand what happened. Look, all I can tell you was what happened and the symptoms the birds showed when I found them and brought them indoors. The vet exam confirmed it. If I had the report after all these years I'd post it. The cage was left outdoors for hours in the wind. Sure, there's a chance one of his neighbors just happened to spray something at just the wrong time. No obvious insect bites.

Last edited by Parnassia; 07-25-2018 at 02:11 AM..
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